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A trick I discovered today which might be of interest to the community. I am not an automotive mechanics and work on my car when I really have to.
recently, I had to change the end-plate on my car (2002 Saab 9-3 SE Turbo Convertible) and to do so I removed the engine from the engine-bay.
On reassembling the engine, I had to lock the flywheel in order to tighten the 6 bolts connecting the flywheel to the crankshaft. the specification for my car are: 14.7 ft-lbs + 50º
Obviously I did not have the proper tool, and purchasing it on line was either too expensive or too time consumingS So I improvised as follow:
  • I put the flywheel on the crankshaft and applied the initial torque of 14.7 ft-lb on all 6 bolts with some blue loctite.
  • Then I used a breaker bar with a 19 mm socket and put the socket on the 1st flywheel bolt. It does not matter which bolt is tightened first, simply mark it so you know where you start
  • Using the long handle (25in) of the breaker bar as a reference, I measured 90º by sight, then took half (45º) and added a little bit to reach 50º, then I made a mark on the flywheel with a marker.
  • before starting all this, l had placed the starter back on the engine with its 2 screws, not tight, just firm (the sprockets on the starter were not engaged on the flywheel teeth since there is no electrical power on the engine)
  • then I placed one large screw driver in one tooth of the flywheel and rested the shaft of the screw driver on the housing of the starter.
  • with one hand, I held the screw driver firmly to prevent the flywheel from turning, and
  • with the other hand I applied pressure on the breaker bar to turn the 1st bolt on the flywheel and tighten it.
  • I tightened until the handle of the breaker bar passed over the mark I had made in the flywheel.
  • It worked! I simply repeated this process 5 times for each of the remaining screws holding the flywheel on the crankshaft.
  • Some caution, one need to be careful with the screw driver so as not to damage the flywheel tooth, also it is good to erase the marker marks made on the flywheel before starting on a new bolts so as not to confuse the marks and turn the bolts the proper 50º
  • Obviously all this is not perfect, but I trust it should work.
I hope the above will help someone. Feel free to make any comment to improve on this DIY methodology
 

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The mechanic I worked with to redo my engine did roughly the same although the screwdriver was just placed between the tooth and the block. I had my doubts but he was sure it would work (he does a lot of engines) and so I went with it. Worked well.

The only thing I will add that I thought was a great idea was that he paint-stick painted a line on each head and the flywheel. That way you could pull the wrench and check to see if you'd hit the spec. It eliminated those "stuff is twisting" issues that give you a bad reading on the angle torque.
 
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