SaabCentral Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently replaced blown head gasket, also had the head resurfaced when it was out, everything went back together smoothly. Before doing the gasket had one cam follower ticking, could hear it but wasn't extremely loud; after doing the gasket it seems louder. Is there any fix for ticky followers? Would new followers even help since the followers and the head wear together?

I now seem to have some seal issues in the cylinders I think. With car running, pull the oil stick out and get puffs of smoke as if compression leaking past, also occasionally get white smoke out the exhaust. White smoke is not nearly as bad as before the gasket replacement when I was burning more coolant than fuel, but I suspect it might just be leftovers cleaning itself out.

Would Restore Engine restorer be of any use in this case? I'm wary of many car products that claim to work miracles by voodoo and have refrained from purchasing them, but this sounds pretty legit. Anyone tried it or had any success with it? Is it ok to use for oil-cooled turbo?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
While I'm here, also have an issue under boost; as it spools up it rattles, almost as if there is an imbalance somewhere in the turbo. When I had it off during gasket replacement could spin the impeller easily by hand and felt ok.

Speaking of rattling, under heavy braking, the front left brakes seem to stutter but not squeal; it doesn't affect braking performance but is disconcerting. May just take the brake assembly apart, see if anything is loose and just put it back together again to see if it persists.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,673 Posts
Possible the hydraulic lifters are just a bit drier after sitting in the head or wherever during disassembly the oil has leaked out, they may take up to 30 or so miles of driving to quieten down, best thing to do is drive the car don't sit around idling it waiting for them to get better. You may have a damaged one, if you said one ticked before you disassembled

The dipstick should not puff at idle (place a tissue over the dipstick at idle, it should not be blown off) that is generally an indication of worn or broken piston rings. Perhaps do a compression test on all cylinders and report back.

I would not buy that crap if it was the last option for a failing engine. If you want to fix a problem with your car you do it the right way and no in a Turbo'd car the potential for it to cause more problems is horrifying IMO (this is just my opinion).

The white smoke could just be residual water/moisture in the exhaust, monitor it and the coolant level, if you are using ethylene glycol antifreeze does the white smoke smell sweet? You should be fine if you replaced the HG.

Sometimes seized piston rings can cause excessive blowby, in these situations people have recommended to use synthetic oil for an interval to free the rings, I think it works pretty well based on their reports.

If your rings are badly worn or broken then a rebuild is in order, there is no other fix for it, not even magic goo voodoo or otherwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Car has been running for some time since gasket replacement, ticking persists; think it's time for a new follower.

How would one go about performing a compression test on all cylinders?

The white smoke has reduced, I suspect it was leftover coolant as the current coolant level has remained fairly constant.

I already use synthetic oil and have for a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,382 Posts
You can try bleeding the valve lifters, there is a procedure.

How long is a "while"? IME that thing ticks and smokes and runs like crap for like an hour after an HG replacement. If you've already driven the car 200 km ok maybe there might be something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,673 Posts
I just meant do a compression test on each cylinder, a compression tester is probably about 5 bucks from an auto store. You then remove the fuel pump relay and disconnect the hall sensor plug (to disable ignition) then you just remove a spark plug at a time or all plugs at once, shove the compression tester in one, open the throttle all the way then crank it over for a reading...

Much easier just to do the tissue test for blowby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
602 Posts
I managed to revive a couple lifters in the following manner: Remove and submerse in oil.
Using a magnetic pickup tool, carefully exercise the plunger to expel old oil until there is little resistance. Reinstall the lifter.

I did this after a head rebuild (had a couple really bad lifters prior to the rebuild) and the car purrs. It might be worth trying before paying $25 for a lifter.

Dustin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I managed to revive a couple lifters in the following manner: Remove and submerse in oil.
Using a magnetic pickup tool, carefully exercise the plunger to expel old oil until there is little resistance. Reinstall the lifter.
Dustin
This sounds interesting, will try this out soon. Thanks.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top