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Discussion Starter #1
Well my Saab has been leaking oil for a while now. the bottom off block and surrounding chassis components have been covered with oil as well as oil burning on manifold. I was hoping my valve cover was the issue but had a feeling it was worse. So last week I replaced valve cover gasket, and I thought it was fixed because there was no longer smoke or the horrible burnt oil smell. Wrong, i still had oil dripping on floor. I jacked car up sprayed oil pan with solvent so it was completely oil free and noticed hairline stress cracks where the engine mount bolted to the pan. The amount of oil leaking is very small I've prob added a third of a quart over 300 miles.

Did anyone ever see this before? Im not surprised this happened because of the stress exerted on the oil pan from this mount. :nono;

Anyway I will pick up JB weld Tom And give that a try to stop the leak. Buying a new pan is crazy expensive so that's not an option. I'll post an update as well as pics of the cracks tomorrow.
 

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would you happen to have a pic of this crack? i changed my seals/gaskets up top , and still am leaking oil. ill be re-sealing the vacuum pump tommorow with RED RTV, but i havent ruled out the worst, rear main seal !!! however your discovery may prove to be same issue in my car. at first i thought the seal on the pan was no good, but now im sure its something from the side where the transmission is mounted to the engine.
 

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On my OG I hit some road debris and cracked the pan. The dealership wanted $1400 or something for it so I took the old one off and had a local welder weld it and magnaflux it. He wouldn't guarantee that it wouldn't leak but it didn't again and I put another 130k on the car.
 

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probably most definantly not the mount that caused this.... at all.... it has a rubber bushing and its not under that heave stress to cause a fracture you probably hit something that section of the oil pan did not flex because of the studs and it caused a crack. its a simple fix just drain your oil grind it down and get someone to weld it, or if your scared of it just grab a new oil pan off a junked saab cant be more than 50 60 bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
probably most definantly not the mount that caused this.... at all.... it has a rubber bushing and its not under that heave stress to cause a fracture you probably hit something that section of the oil pan did not flex because of the studs and it caused a crack. its a simple fix just drain your oil grind it down and get someone to weld it, or if your scared of it just grab a new oil pan off a junked saab cant be more than 50 60 bucks.
def. not from hitting anything there isn't a scratch on the oil pan. If JB weld doesn't work then next step will be to take it down, and I'll TIG it myself. but it is gonna be a ***** to get off, either engine needs to be pulled or sub-frame must be dropped. To properly weld a crack the crack needs to be cut open a few mm so you can penetrate the crack fully and fill with aluminum rod from one side then from the other side of the pan the cracked area needs to be melted completely with the torch and filled to assure there is no air holes which will just leak again.
 

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Discussion Starter #6




This pic shows that one crack starts at the bolt for the mount which branches out, then there is also a crack starting at the drain plug which also branches out
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Here is pics of complete oil pan just to show that it was never hit or bottomed out

 

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Instead of taking it off an welding, buy a new one for $257.50. Then you don't have to worry about other failures.

Those bolts look rounded. Were they over torqued causing the stress fracture. It sure seems odd that that rubber engine mount wouldn't absord the vibration and would transfer the stress to the metal. The engine was designed and built in Germany for Saab.

http://www.saabusaparts.com/index.php?cPath=1_158
 

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you dont have to buy a brand new one find one ina junk yard, and yeah it looks like someone tightened the ever live **** out of that bolt. probably expanded the threads the heat just made it worse. and the only thing i can say about the other cracks is maybe they are heat induced as well you could have run it really hot and plopped it in a pile of snow doing this constantly will promote extreme expanding and contracting.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
you dont have to buy a brand new one find one ina junk yard, and yeah it looks like someone tightened the ever live **** out of that bolt. probably expanded the threads the heat just made it worse. and the only thing i can say about the other cracks is maybe they are heat induced as well you could have run it really hot and plopped it in a pile of snow doing this constantly will promote extreme expanding and contracting.
The snow theory sounds possible. I've only had the car for 6 months/15,000 mls and slight leakage was present since I've owned it. If JB weld doesn't work I'll prob end up buying a used one if i can find it.
 

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The snow theory sounds possible. I've only had the car for 6 months/15,000 mls and slight leakage was present since I've owned it. If JB weld doesn't work I'll prob end up buying a used one if i can find it.
Just a suggestive question...Does anyone think that maybe high temp rtv silicone might work better here? I know the black permatex stuff is oil resistant. I'm thinking that the JB weld won't flex much, so with repeated movement it might just crack again.
 

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The snow theory sounds possible. I've only had the car for 6 months/15,000 mls and slight leakage was present since I've owned it. If JB weld doesn't work I'll prob end up buying a used one if i can find it.
Somebody replaced parts on that car and overtorqued the crap out of them. That isn't a Saab/GM/Vauxhaul problem. It's a monkey wrench problem.

It would be great if you could find a used one, but get the torque specs and follow them. The Saab mechanic that fixed the oil leak on the old 2001 (known fault covered under warranty) said to never use the original bolts on certain engine parts. He put in all new head bolts. You might want to consider using new bolts by the looks of them.
 

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Jiffy lube did that to my 99 9-3 SE oil pan, cracked it using an impact wrench (awesome job fellas). I made them pay for it. In that car, you had to support the engine to change the pan, so the repair/replacement was either 700 or 1300 (can't remember now).
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just a suggestive question...Does anyone think that maybe high temp rtv silicone might work better here? I know the black permatex stuff is oil resistant. I'm thinking that the JB weld won't flex much, so with repeated movement it might just crack again.
Ive used jb weld on a cracked valve cover as well as cracked exhaust headers and both are still holding strong for over 1.5 years. Permatex might work also but I'm gonna stick to what i know worked in similar situations. I'm hoping for the best
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That definitely makes sense - and anyhow, this is all relatively low risk. If one sealant fails you can always try another.
thats for sure. takes less time than changing my oil to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well there is still oil on the bottom of the pan. I think I also have a leak between the pan and the block on the side facing the rear of my car. So I'm not sure where the leak is exactly and if the JB weld worked or not. Eventually I'll find a good used pan or break for a new one. Until then I'll just cope and keep a drip pan in my garage.
 

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Jiffy lube did that to my 99 9-3 SE oil pan, cracked it using an impact wrench (awesome job fellas). I made them pay for it. In that car, you had to support the engine to change the pan, so the repair/replacement was either 700 or 1300 (can't remember now).
Impact wrench on oil pan = Monumental Fail

The things I see in the shop and hear about on forums never cease to amaze me. Glad you got them to pay the repair.
 
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