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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my 900 Carlsson serviced and tuned yesterday, and on driving home...noticed a terrible knocking coming from the rear....
I stopped and checked the wheels in case they hadn't been tightened (which has happened before...) but could find nothing...
The noise continued all the way home...so I jacked the car up to find that the driver side rear shock appears to have burst up thro' the wheel arch...and was causing the noise... the whole internal arch seems to have disintegrated causing this...
Does anybody know how serious this might be, as I am quite worried...
Any suggestions would be welcome!

Why do these things happen on a Bank Holiday Weekend!!!!
 

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The area where the top of the shock is attached is a rust trap. I'm guessing the shock punched up through the rusted metal--happened to me once:evil:

The best fix is to have a piece of metal (with a pre-drilled hole for the shock shaft) welded onto the rust-damaged frame rail (actually, a U-channel spot-welded to the wheelarch wall).

If the hole is not too big, you could cut a disk from thick metal (or a sandwich of thinner layers), place these on the shock shaft, insert the shock up through the frame rail, and cap it with another disk and the usual rubber bushings, etc. I did this as an emergency fix, and it lasted over a year (at which point, I scrapped the car due to other rust:cry: ).
 

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Matthew.. like the new signature. Very... Oppenheimer. Imagine that, a hydrogen powered Saab:eek:
 

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Sorry to hear about your problem, but it probably isn't as drastic as it looks, and any decent welder should be able to make a good repair, with or without the genuine Saab part. Because the fuel tank is so close, he may want to drain it. To get access, he will have to remove the shock absorber, and since it will almost certainly need replacement, it'd be a good time to change both sides.
Also check the brake lines - especially the flexible hoses - for damage that might have been caused when the suspension moved. Oh, and check the bump stop - it may have been knocked off.

Good luck - shame you're in Dublin, or I'd give you a hand...

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Richard....

I need to find a decent welder first...and of course I now can't go on hols...Oh well! I'd only be spending money that could otherwise go on the car!
The rear shocks were actually replaced about 6 months ago...so they should be ok...It was just the pain of hearing the awful noise!
Will keep you updated!

Cheers...
Alex
 

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Carlsson900 said:
I'd only be spending money that could otherwise go on the car!
Hey, who needs holidays when you have a Saab to tinker with?:D

Seriously, I hope you manage to find somebody who can do you a good job - worth looking around, I think. Maybe ask one of your service guys who they get to do their odd welding jobs? Or look for some classic car restoration specialists - they're likely to have the skills - not to say the enthusiasm for the job - needed here. (I don't think a typical repair shop will be interested...)

While you've got the car off the road, be a good idea to check the other side - as ProfZ says, this area is a real rust trap, and is especially a problem when the winter roads are heavily salted - what's Dublin like for that?

Ask the welder to prime the repair with etching zinc-rich primer (or weld-through zinc primer) before he puts the patch in place, and to use the same when he cleans up. If you can, ask him to leave the repair free of underseal, and do this part yourself: underseal is a wonderful way to cover up a hurried repair job, if you see what I mean...
 

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jrmcb said:
Because the fuel tank is so close, he may want to drain it.
Sorry but I have to strongly disagree with that. ALthough the tank is void of liquid it is still full of vapors-- FULL! Vapor is the more explosive and most dangerous of the two. The only way to completely eliminate fuel vapor is to have a completely full tank before welding.
 

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You'r right escalator guru - I didn't imply that the welder should just empty the tank - he also has to flush it with inert gas - most welders have access to Argon or Carbon Dioxide - or remove it completely.

Leaving the tank full of fuel is better than a tank full of vapour, sure, but I wouldn't weld right next to a full tank of fuel, even if it was full...:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jeez....a classic car specialist in Dublin? Are you nuts?
They simply don't want to know....
They don't salt the roads over here either....one of the benefits of a lethargic council!
I can already see the Euros floating out the window......Money Money Money.....
 

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Weld Repair

Carlsson900, I MIG welded a heavy gauge washer over the opening for the shock stud on my 85 SPG years ago. I did not do anything with the fuel tank. I connected the ground clamp as close to the work as possible away from the fuel tank. No issues. It still holds today.

Good luck,
Jon
jon1..

 

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The fuel tank on the 900 is plastic, so rust pinholes (and resulting vapor leaks) are a non-problem. The system is totally sealed, so unless there's been collision damage and/or a known leak exists, I don't see the need for elaborate precautions before welding in the wheelarch area.

I've used oxyacetylene on exhaust components near the back of both of our 900s, and have MIG-welded repair pieces into the wheel arches themselves--all, obviously, without problems:cool:
It all boils down to common sense: Weld in a well-ventilated area, and if you smell fuel before you begin, attend to that problem first:eek:
 
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