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Discussion Starter #1
I called the Saab dealer looking for the Timing Cover gaskets, both the left and right side, and to my surprise they showed a tube of anaerobic sealer as the part used :eek:. I know that there are paper gaskets for this on Eeuroparts.com but I need them ASAP and I don't want to pay for overnight delivery on a $3.00 part.

So my question is...did Saab discontinue the use of these paper gaskets for this repair?

I know that the gasket on the flywheel case was apparently unnecessary so I was instructed to use a sealant, but this is the case this area seems to take the pressure from the oil pump to the block...which is where the gasket failed originally.

If anyone else has used an anaerobic sealer with success for the timing cover please let me know. I could wait a week for the part, but would rather not.

Any insight will be apprectiated as always.

Thanks.:D
 

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I used the sealant on my 99GL that I put a 900 engine in. It seems to work ok, but the engine's only run for about an hour so far so I can't comment on the longetivity. I'm sure it's fine though - they wouldn't have used it otherwise.
 

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I am also just about to use this new liquid gasket for my engine re-assembly. The guys down at my local Saab specialists told me this stuff is kosha. They said it stays soft until the engine gets up to running temp then sets rock solid. I guess when you remember that most 900 engine bays are covered in oil it is probably a good thing that Saab have changed the gasket solution.
 

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The valve cover gaskets are available from other sources apart from Saab dealers. The problem with sealants is that they get squeezed out when you tighten down the cam cover and after they set hard they can break off and clog the oil pickup leading to engine faliure. I use a slight smear of non hardening sealant on the lower edge with the standard gasket.
 

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I kinda got the impression that we weren’t talking about the cam-cover gasket? (I wasn't anyway ) I guess it's just a good idea to make sure you do a really even job with the liquid gasket. I'm yet to see a dry engine bay though - so I'm in favour of anything that works towards correcting that.
 

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No this is the timing cover gasket that's being discussed:



A new cam cover gasket should ideally be used each time else it will leak. That one is definitely still available.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the input! :D

I will be picking up a tube of the sealer today and give it a try. If it leaks when I bench test the engine then I will go with the gaskets, but I'm sure it will be fine.

Thanks again!
 

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hey if your bench-testing the engine does that mean it's a special build or do you just happen to have engine testing facilities handy? If your modifing it would be interesting to know the specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sorry...no special mods, just a simple rebuild.

When I say "bench test" I'm just referring to hooking up the starter and turning it over a few times to check for oil leaks before I put it back in the car.
 

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Ok, this is going back a whole bunch of years (maybe two or three decades), but I recall my old man buying "paper" and making gaskets himself; we rebuilt a carburator for a Simca Chambord with gaskets made like this, in the kitchen counter of an appartment, with rubber cement as sealant with excellent results. Maybe it was my Dad's skill, but the process is still valid for us tyros. Incidentally, the old man used to race cross country regularity rallys... in a SAAB :) He spoke fondly of a time in Lima, Peru, that an improper carburator calibration made the engine seize - something to do with altitude and density of air... in the middle of a dry river bed somewhere in the middle of no-freaking-where :) Once SAAB pulled the sponsorship (read: they wouldn't give him cars and parts, he never got paid for racing) he raced FIATs, a 1500 and later on an Alpha Giulietta and an Europa made in Argentina. I think his last races were on an Auto Union, but it could have been a Skoda. But I disgress.

He used a spoon (yep, a regular soup spoon) to outline and sometimes even cut the paper agains the piece, and a ball bearing and a peen hammer to make the holes for screws.

I used this technique to rebuild a BSA motorbike engine many years ago, in a far away place. I don't know whether the paper or fiber for gaskets is available, but google my turn up a source.

Just an alternative to "goop" that may make you more comfortable; I know I rather smear goop on a proper gasket than depend on goop alone.
 

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nutcase said:
No this is the timing cover gasket that's being discussed:
I can see where the confusion might come from: Oyster never said if his engine was 8V or 16V, and the 16V uses an O-ring for the oil-pump housing in the same location where the timing cover goes on the 8V.
 

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The 8v uses an O ring as well - the oil pump is the same on both types :) As is the timing cover gaskets.

I have had to make a few gaskets for my engine now - two for the wastegate on the turbo and one for the fuel pump on the GL. Gasket paper is readily available, as is the liquid stuff.
 

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For normal ones then yes, go for it. For posh ones like diff cover, gearbox to block etc. etc. that are made from a laminate type of gasket material then I'd go for OEM. O ring ones if you can find someone who does that size then go for it as well, as long as it's made from something oil resistant (viton?).
 
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