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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

Over the last few months ive got a handfull of PMs asking how I made my CAI. I promised a write up, so here it is.. better late then never!

First, for supplies..

1 Air filter of your choice, however it should have a 3 inch ID.
1 Piece of bent tubing of your choice. (looks are up to you) 3 inch OD.
1 Nylon sleeve (as pictured) tappered style would be the best, however not
needed.
3 Band clamps.. 1 time at band clamp.. i stuck a screwdriver in my slot! lol,
;oops: sorry
1 Element breather. (as pictured) not needed, but it couldnt hurt to have,
and it looks nice!

Tools needed:

Regular screwdriver
Saab torx driver
A saw of some sort! the finer the teeth the better. Ill explain later.

I am NOT responsible if you hack up this job. this is for info purposes only.

With that said, this is a SIMPLE job to do. if you can tie your shoes, you can do this!
Keep in mind that I originally did this last summer, so if i leave out a detail, my bad!

Step By Step:

1. Remove the MAF sensor. Be very carefull, these are fragile. there is no
need to unplug any wires, but once you have it out of its
home, slip a baggie over it, for added piece of mind.

2. Disassemble, and remove the entire Air box. (upper and lower)

3. On the upper portion of the airbox, you will see where you just
removed the MAF from. About 2 inches toward the box, you will
notice where the 'round' starts to flatten on one side.
about 3/4 of an inch after that, is where i made my mark.
once you have that mark, that is where you will cut the airbox tubing.
3a. This is where a fine toothed saw comes into play. if all you have is
rough toothed saw, thats OK. just be prepared to sand the edge
smooth before you assemble.

4. Take whatever you are using for tubing, and figure out where you need
make you cuts. Your best bet is to hold it in place where you are going
to want it, mark and cut. remember, when marking for the tube cut, you
want the end of the air box and the CAI tube to be as close together as
possible.

5. Once you have done the above, repeat the process on the other end
of the CAI tube, as to fit the filter.

6. Make sure all of your ends are cut straight and smooth. it doesnt have to
perfect, but theres no point in doing a half-azzed job!

7. Assemble as shown.

8. Take your car for a hell-ride and enjoy the sweet sound of turbo!

9. Hop on SaabCentral.com and tell everyone how cool it is! (and then get
flamed by some hater!:roll: )
 

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i'd been thinking about an aftermarket air filter but was wondering if there was any significant performance increase or if a mod like yours (which looks pretty neat, i think) is more for appearances. how does it work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well, it depends on if you have any exhaust work done. either way this will help reduce turbo lag, hence it will spool alot faster. however, if you have exhaust work done, it will help that much more. but yes, it DOES help performance. Ive heard some people around here say that due to the T8 system, any gain is negated. i think that is false. maybe its just 'butt-dyno', but im convinced it is a faster car with this done.
 

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Nice write-up gunner, thanks for posting it!

I have two questions for you:
1: Did the mileage go up, down, or stay about the same?
2: In absence of the heatshield, how did you support the assembly?

I'd assume for #2 that it's just hanging there, or perhaps the rubber tip of the conefilter is resting on the chassis. I notice that the heatshield seems to provide the obvious heat shielding effect, but also offers some support to the rig. You have had this on for a while now, is it all pretty secure still? (oops, thats three Qs)
 

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thats not really a CAI...

CAI sucks in cold air away from the engine compartment...thats just a short ram. Your short ram sucks in hot air so its usefulness is controversial.

The main argument that occurs is that your engine will get more wear due to dust ingestion. Is the slight increase in horsepower worth the long term risks?

Another problem is that the engine electronics in modern cars regulate fuel and air mixture automatically. even if you would have unrestricted airflow to the manifold, there would simply not get more air used than the system dictates. Intake systems only make sense, when you change the electronics, with a PPC for example.
 

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What keeps it from flopping about all over the place? I mean, going over bumps and the normal movement of the engine under torque is bound to make the intake move around if you don't bolt the filter end down in some way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
seeker, it seems to stay on its own. i was going to address this issue when i first did the install. however, i gave it a trial run, and never had any problems. so i never bothered to do anything more to secure it.


Scoop, how do you figure there is more 'dust ingestion'? this is a K&N, not some pice of junk from wallyworld. if it was i could see your point, but that is not the case, so dust plays no role in this matter.
as far as air intake. i believe that the (almost all) factory airbox is restrictive. maybe with the ECM the way it is, it wont use the full amount of air that is supplied, however, it does use some of it. and the fact that the turbo spools quicker helps too.
as far as it sucking in hot air.. so does the BSR model. as does just about any CAI out there. and yes, im sticking with the term "CAI". do a google search for cold air intake, and see what comes up. i think were on different lingo.

Voodo, no big difference in MPG.
 

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this is a K&N, not some pice of junk from wallyworld
nice install.

I've used a K&N filter for many years now on my Land Rovers where the dirt factor is much more servere than what the Saab will ever see without any ill-effects. key is keeping it properly oiled.

just be careful in the cleaning and oiling process so you don't foul the MAF. this was a topic a few months ago as well.


Jaime
 

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The stock snorkel opening is still just below the cone, coming from the fenderwall, so ther is still a good rush of cool air when you are moving forward, ejecting toward the filter and then onto the engine. It would be intersting to see if there is much difference with or without the shield, at least in this app. Of course at a stoplight it is no doubt sucking some warm air. Then again, your needs at idle are not great.

So no drag racing in stop & go traffic, and definitely not in reverse. I know that's tempting for you, gunner.:cheesy:

I've seen a sort of half-shield fixture that attaches to the base of the cone before, you could always use one of these on the engine side. It could also provide an anchor point if that was a concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
oh, ive got an anchor for it, but it would need to be painted to look "saab materiel" according to some folks!:lol:


see ya guys.. im off to do some downtown reverse racing.. hahahahahaha:p
 

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ignorance is bliss I suppose.

short ram gives you a nice cool sound, little power as well...

there was a test done with the 2001 m5
they compared stock intake vs K&N air filter
the results showed more power from the K&N (nothing major) but much more dust ingestion with it as well

i'll ask my friend about it, he has the article I believe...

(heres some other info if you wnat, from bmw boards)

Dinan don't sell K&N because of the additional fine dirt particles and their Dyno tests show no performance gain using a K&N Cone Filter. They are not recommended unless you have a way of ducting cool air to it..

Dyno tests on M3's have proven that K&N cone filters loose HP over the stock filter unless you find a way to duct cool air directly to the cone filter.
The raw results from the US Lab (for the doubting thomases) are posted at:

http://www.bonnevillemotorwerks.com/dynocharts/intake/KN/kntest.pdf

This is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format.. you'll need the Acrobat Reader
which is of course available from http://www.adobe.com if you don't
already have it. It's free.

What the results show is that:

1) The Cotton-Gauze filters let in considerably more dirt (300-500% more)
than stock

and

2) Very rapidly, the cotton-gauze filters load up and flow WORSE than stock

Where a K&N type filter flows rather well right out of the box, it cannot sustain
that flow for very long at all.
> Another more important issue, is the intake air temperature. If
> you equip your engine with the cone-type K&N, you should do
> something to isolate it from the rest of engine compartment.

very true.
unshielded cone filters (K&N or any other) were reported to yield a net
_loss_ hp.
I was at Dinan Engineering for a seminar last weekend, and talked to Steve
Dinan about exactly this issue (the benefits of adding a K&N air filter). He
had two things to say:

1. The K&N filter is not as effective in taking particulates out as the
factory paper filter is, so you will increase engine wear.


2. The factory filter pulls cool air from outside the engine compartment,
while the K&N will pull warm air from the area behind the radiator.
Warm air
is less dense than cold, so this can cost 6-13 HP!!

3. According to their actual tests on a Dynamometer, you will *lose*
horsepower, not gain it.
He said he wished it were different, as lots of
people want to buy K&Ns from them, and he could make money selling them, but
they have a policy of only selling things which *improve* performance.
Not sure if you know who Steve Dinan is...but he's not some chump who is clueless as to what is going on...

turbo cars + deshielded cone = thumbs up.

would you like me to continue?
 

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one more for fun

Land Rover list guys
in Africa have reported that a (properly oiled) engine with
a K&N will be shot after a couple weeks of driving in convoy
on dusty roads. Land Rover list member Daniel from San
Francisco who shipped his Land Rover to Africa for a safari
heard many K&N horror stories while waiting for his engine
to be rebuilt. He went from burning a quart of oil every
3,000 miles to burning a quart an HOUR in two weeks (driving
in a convoy with other vehicles kicking up dust). On Land
Rover trips in Northern California we do a lot of driving on
logging roads and the big Cat tractors that make the roads
grind the dirt in to fine baby powder like consistency. It
is ugly to look under a K&N filter after a day of off
roading on logging roads. I think K&N filters are fine for
track days (or if you are leasing a car and don't care if
the engine lasts more than 30,000 miles), but I will always
pop the paper filter back in for the drive home from the
track on a car I care about. With the Range Rover I always
replace the paper air filter with another paper after I
leave the pavement (and pop an oiled sponge in to the air
horn). When I swap filters so I have a clean one for the
drive home and bang the filter on the ground I am amazed how
much dirt makes it past the oiled foam.

Kevin Kelly
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
try to remember if you can, that im not actually driving my 93 across Africa on a safari....:roll: the fact that you wasted all of your day looking up stupid articles, just to post them here, makes me laugh. go get a hobby. (other than looking up stupid articles)
 

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ScoopSS said:
Dyno tests on M3's have proven that K&N cone filters loose HP over the stock filter unless you find a way to duct cool air directly to the cone filter.
He is ducting cold air directly to the cone filter. It's situated directly above the duct, in fact.

Granted, there is no heat shield, but it is hardly in some stuffy corner of the engine bay with little ventilation, it is taking at least as much air as though it were right behind the grille. I'm not endorsing Gunner's choice to omit the heatshield, but your assertion may well not be applicable here.

As for the dust, I could not tell you, but it sounds reasonable that a tighter/denser filter such as paper would be more effective at filtering out particulate matter. How these observations factor into a car driven on the highway I could not say. And I am quite familiar with Dinan Engineering, and do respect Steve Dinan. There are a lot of variables with a K&N type filter. For example, they assert that you need to service them only once per 50,000 to 100,000 miles... I can't say that I'd ever go that long, even if it were proven okay.

ScoopSS said:
ignorance is bliss I suppose.
Sounds more troll-ish than anything else. Your post might have carried more heft without that needless jab.
 

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It is ugly to look under a K&N filter after a day of off-roading on logging roads.

as the Land Rover reference obviously was directed at me, I'm going to respond.

1. driving down dirt roads is not really "off-roading". its driving down a dirt road.:lol:
2. if one actually does take a Rover off-highway, you probably would be shocked at how dirty the entire engine compartment actually gets - not just some dust under a filter.
3. the shop that restores/services/etc. my LRs (5 of them in the US) is the most highly regarded shop in the United States and has built/shipped LRs all over the world - including Africa - with K&N filters.

sorry, when it comes to Land Rovers you are barking up the wrong tree.

Saab content - we purchased the 'vert in order to actually have a car versus always driving in a truck even if its a Land Rover. always brings a smile to my face when we drop the top and drive away on a sunny day. :cheesy: can't wait to get back home and enjoy it again.


Jaime
 

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Lol...the articles took me about 5 minutes to find. They were from the same thread at a bmw board.

One of the articles actually loaded up a pdf with lab results and real scientific proof.

It doesn't matter...do your thing, put your K&N on, think with your "butt-dyno"...theres no point trying to explain something when the other side already has firm beliefs that are perfectly correct.

congradulations to you for a job well done!
 

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Anybody know any pros or cons to an oiled foam filter like what Greddy and HKS use?:confused:
 

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m4gunner...from your pictures, it looks like a job very well done. i've been thinking about a cone filter, or even the j&r drop-in filter, but have decided against it. i actually used the j&r drop-in filter in my '03 SS, but when it got bought back by saab for oil seeping through the cylinder walls, i decided not to use it anymore on my '04 model. i'm sure problems using these types of filters are few and far between, but seeing as how these cars are not the most reliable cars on the road, i plan to keep my engine bone stock despite how bad i want that intake/turbo sound. in my opinion, k&n has done a very good job of marketing their intakes. common sense tells me if more air is able to travel through these filters, more dirt is going through as well. i find it hard to believe that the oil on these filters will grab more dirt than what a stock paper filter will filter out (k&n claims better filtration than stock paper filters). have you seen how big some of the holes are in these types of filters? also, it's pretty obvious by now that the stock airbox in the SS flows more than enough air for this engine. if this was not the case, you'd immediately see horsepower gains with a simple intake swap...but unfortunately none of us have really seen this. at the very least, a swap of the intake AND exhaust should yield significant horsepower gains, but yet again, this is not the case. these days, very few cars will actually benefit from a higher flow intake. of course you will see highly modified cars using these types of intakes...because their modified, higher horsepower engines need more air than what the stock airbox will provide. this is why unless you have modified other parts of your engine to increase horsepower, you will not see any real horsepower gains with only an intake swap. all this being said, i'm still thinking about the j&r filter again, but i can't seem to decide. one example of my basis for concern?...check below.

air filtration test
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Cojoroh, I see your concern of "to mod or not to mod" after your past issues. yes, i would definitely agree that a K&N or the equivalent would let in more debris, being that it is a high flow filter. regarding the intake/exhaust performance part.. now, I'm not saying that the factory airbox isn't sufficient, it is. however, i think we would see how 'restrictive' is really is if we were able to see this engine without the T8 system. that's the real killer in the mix here. oh well i guess. aside from dumping 10-20k into it for a new engine setup, i guess we're stuck with it!



Scoop, if you put as much effort into your school work as you do, being a bell-end, you'd probably know how to spell congraTulations..:roll:

now if you fellas will excuse me, I've got a race across the Serengeti to compete in!
 
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