SaabCentral Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know whether or not I would cause pre-detonation by using standard 6 range resistor NGK plugs with avg hwy speeds of 70-85 mph? 99% of my driving consist of hwy. So would this instance be classified as "reg/hard driving conditions. Particularly with constant sustained high speeds. I was trying to locate a cooler plug in the 7 range from NGK for my 900 turbo, but all I keep getting is the Iridium plugs. I don't mind using copper, but again is the 6 range too hot for my driving circumstances? Does anyone know of a colder range 7 ngk plug that would be applicable to 1991 900 turbos 2.0 16 valves. Again the basic standard NGK plugs now in the car are noted for city driving. Please all reponses would be greatly appreciated!!:confused:

Best Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,302 Posts
BCP6ES (without resistor) is ideal for everything but constant 100+ mph, when the colder 7s would last a little longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Jim Mesthene said:
BCP6ES (without resistor) is ideal for everything but constant 100+ mph, when the colder 7s would last a little longer.
One thing I'm still trying to figure out is why there would be a need to have 'resistor' style spark plugs. When I went sourcing new plugs for my 89 16V car a while back, the parts store didn't have any of the resistor version (and they didn't stock the iridium version) so I purchased the standard version and they work just fine.

In one of my 8V cars I do have the V-groove version of the standard plugs and they're fine also.

Craig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Jim Mesthene said:
BCP6ES (without resistor) is ideal for everything but constant 100+ mph, when the colder 7s would last a little longer.
Thanks! So severe and or hard driving is considered as 100 plus mph? I guess my average 70-85 mph should be ok on my standard resistor NGK coppers? I usually use NGK V-Power Plugs. But this is only my second Turbo. How soon should I replace the standards in a turbo (my usual average is every 10,000 miles)? These plugs seem to fire very well in very frigid temps. Also would the car's engine tend to get a tad bit warm at times (higher temps) by using a hotter plug, and driving at high speeds for 60-90 minutes on the hwy, versus using a colder plug, and or do you know of a plug with a colder number within the NGK Copper line that would fit my 900 16v 2.0 engine? The strange thing is that my car didn't run 75% up to the hot marker until I replaced the colder 7's that were originally in the engine (NGK Iridiums). Unless of course it is directly a cooling system issue? This happens 50% of the time upon coming off the hwy, after 60 plus minutes and into the city. Or off/on even during some very city driving. However the cooling fans almost always brings the temps right back down. But on the hwy, this never happens (consistent 40-50% range) Either way I am working on replacing my radiator and other crucial cooling system components. Despite all of this, the engine runs absolutely smooth, and is extremely quiet overall, I didn't detect any knocking, and or pinging. All I use is Shell V-POWER/Lucas UCL/an occasional top notch Complete Fuel System Cleaner like Chevron Techron. I have heard that our motors don't really develop a lubrication issue regarding upper cylinders, in that it is a very rare occurence? Sorry for such a long thesis;oops: ! What say you? Thanks again:) !


Best Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks! I was given a standard resistor NGK plug, because the NGK V-Power plugs were unavailable at the time. I like the NGK V-Power coppers, because they fire so well, and tend not to allow crud and or junk build up on them. They especially fire well in sub degree temps!
c900 said:
One thing I'm still trying to figure out is why there would be a need to have 'resistor' style spark plugs. When I went sourcing new plugs for my 89 16V car a while back, the parts store didn't have any of the resistor version (and they didn't stock the iridium version) so I purchased the standard version and they work just fine.

In one of my 8V cars I do have the V-groove version of the standard plugs and they're fine also.

Craig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,302 Posts
BCP5ES is approved for N/A cars.
Hot or cold plugs don't affect engine temperature. "Hot" or "cold" refers to the plug's ability to dissipate heat. The colder the plug (without fouling), the longer it will resist erosion (wearing out). The hotter the plug (without pre-ignition), the greater the resistance to fouling.
Plugs should last about 30k. It's a waste of money to replace them before they're worn out.
Your attacks on your fuel system with various chemicals are also likely to be a waste of money with no discernible benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Jim Mesthene said:
BCP5ES is approved for N/A cars.
Hot or cold plugs don't affect engine temperature. "Hot" or "cold" refers to the plug's ability to dissipate heat. The colder the plug (without fouling), the longer it will resist erosion (wearing out). The hotter the plug (without pre-ignition), the greater the resistance to fouling.
Plugs should last about 30k. It's a waste of money to replace them before they're worn out.
Your attacks on your fuel system with various chemicals is also likely to be a waste of money with no discernible benefit.
Got it, thanks!:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,388 Posts
Anyone have any experience w/ the iridium version(BCPR6EIX) of the BCP6EV in a turbo car, does the hotter 6EV Have any effect on the A.P.C.?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top