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Probably a stupid question, but here goes.

After a LONG time I'm finally getting close to seeing if I can get my '89 16V N/A up and running. This car has been off the road since 1999. Engine went back in the car last weekend and now I'm ready to start adding fluids.

I have the following coolants in my garage: basic green stuff (Ford Motorcraft brand), DexCool, and some European blue stuff (for BMW, M-B, VW, Jaguar, Volvo, etc.). The DexCool will remain on the shelf. Was planning on using the green coolant, but wanted opinions on the blue European coolant.

Thoughts?
 

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Some people are proponents of G05 (Zerex, or from the Chrysler dealer) but count me in for green. Use with distilled water, change it every two years.

Or use Prestone green "Extended" with distilled water and change every five.
 

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Im planning on replacing mine soon...so any pre-mix green? brand?
currently I use the blue..pentofrost I think..?
Why premix? Pick up a gallon of Prestone Extended Life and a gallon of distilled water from the grocery store. Just pour half the distilled water into a large container, refill the gallon container with Prestone, then pour the distilled water in the container into the Prestone container. It's a $20 solution to a complete drain & refill. DO NOT pour the two liquids in separately. They MUST be mixed together first or they can actually stay separate in the cooling system. No Bueno!
 

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While I understand the slight convenience of buying premixed coolant, save your money. The concentrated coolant may cost a couple of bucks more than the premix, but that gallon of distilled water is one dollar. That's a no brainer in my book for a few minutes effort.
 

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Don't believe that. The car's pump and cooling system act like a liquidiser. I defy anything to stay separate for long.
That's a shame, it would be pleasing to the eye if different colours could be separated to make rainbow like coolant.
 

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Don't believe that. The car's pump and cooling system act like a liquidiser. I defy anything to stay separate for long.
You can defy it all you want, but every single coolant manufacturer explicitly recommends mixing before adding. If you do not, the heavier coolant will have a tendency to sink to the bottom of the radiator and stay there while lighter, thinner water travels over the top and may get "stuck" in pockets or cavities. These scenarios reduce the effectiveness of the system and possibly cause damage.

Will it happen? Maybe not. Probably not worth taking the risk, and instead following the directions on the container, but that's your call. Premixing ensures the water and coolant are fully mixed. Once they are mixed, they will stay that way.
 

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the heavier coolant will have a tendency to sink to the bottom of the radiator and stay there while lighter, thinner water travels over the top and may get "stuck" in pockets or cavities.
That's not possible. The hot water flows in the top of the rad and is sucked out the bottom after being cooled by the rad. No "thinner" water travels the other way. There are no pockets and nothing gets stuck there. I am not advocating not following instructions.
 

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That's not possible. The hot water flows in the top of the rad and is sucked out the bottom after being cooled by the rad. No "thinner" water travels the other way. There are no pockets and nothing gets stuck there. I am not advocating not following instructions.
Then we agree to first mix externally, then add. Nice!
 

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I've been around for a few coolant wars on aluminum and iron setups. Green is fine if you flush every two to three years. I really like Pentofrost NF (blue stuff), I have it in virtually all my Saabs and it's been fantastic even when I'm lazy about flushing. It also doesn't interact / gel with green so you don't have to go too crazy with a flush when changing.

Tom
 

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After some research, I've found that the german worldwide chemical giant BASF makes its own coolant, sold under the commercial name GLYSANTIN, and has a Saab approval for the use of its products (Approval-Code 690 1599). In this schedule, you can cross referencing the coolant type with the car brand and year. See here: https://www.glysantin.de/sites/default/files/2018-08/GLYSANTIN_List-Cars_EN.pdf?1575985648.

According to the schedule, Saabs up to 2000 use the Glysantin G48 type.

On this site (https://www.ato24.de/en/blog/which-coolant-antifreeze) you can find very good info on coolant types, and a cross reference matrix between BASF and Volkswagen (VW) referencing systems.

Notice that BASF's GLYSANTIN may be sold under it's own name, or rebranded. In the UK, you can find that COMMA Oils use the BASF stuff.

I wouls like to hear your comments on this! Cheers
 

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I'm not sure what you're looking far... BASF/Glysantin is behind virtually every modern coolant specification. Whether you buy their products, licensed products, or other-branded compatible products you're getting roughly the same thing.
 

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Just general thoughts on what reference to use.
I've heard different opinions on what coolant reference to use. Since the manuals (Bentley, Haynes, even Saab's manuals available on pdf here on SaabCentral) don't mention what specification to use, I take confort on what BASF puts on their reference matrix. I'm about to start using the G48 reference (50%G48 + 50%distiled water) on my 1981 900 turbo!
 
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