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Discussion Starter #1
I was hoping someone could help me as I have a bit of a problem with my clutch.

I have just replaced my gearbox (manual), clutch and slave cylinder on my 2002 Aero. The problem I have now is that when I press the clutch pedal it just launches itself at the floor.

As far as I am aware I primed the slave cylinder properly. Squeezed out all the old fluid, connected a hose, filled this with brake fluid and cycled the cylinder by compressed air and pressure to push it back in etc...

When I get someone in the car to press the clutch it goes straight to the floor even after bleeding the system. As I look through the small access hatch in the front I can't see the piston moving at all but I can move the release bearing along the shaft with a lever. There's no signs of leaks anywhere in the system either.

Any help with this would be appreciated as I have been trying to sort this out for the last 5 hours and the next step is going to be a rag in the petrol tank and a zippo!

Cheers,

Pug.
 

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Bleeding the clutch hydraulic system:
1.) Unscrew the cap from the brake fluid reservoir
2.) Top up the brake fluid in the reservoir as necessary.
3.) Undo the bleed nipple.
4.) Connect brake bleeder (88 19 096) to the bleed nipple.
5.) Connect compressed air to the bleeding tool and bleed the clutch until clear fluid runs from the nipple.
6.) Tighten the bleed nipple and remove the bleeder tool.
7.) Fit Adapter, cooling system tester (30 05 451) to the brake fluid reservoir. Use two sealing rings (10-45 43 997) to ensure the seal of the cap.
8.) Hold the brake bleeder hose to the nipple and bleed the reservoir for about 1 minute or so long as the bubbles rise to the surface.
9.) Check clutch operation and top up brake fluid to the correct level.
10.) Refit all components.

Bleeding the slave cylinder:
1.) Connect a 450mm long piece of clean, transparent 8mm plastic hose to the slave cylinder delivery pipe connection.
2.) Fully depress the release bearing once and then release it. The slave cylinder seal remains in its inner position.
3.) Fill the plastic hose with brake fluid to a level of about 350mm.
4.) Connect (30 14 883) Pressure/Vacuum pump to the plastic hose. Use a 6mm plastic hose (this is used to provide a tight seal).
5.) Pump up pressure until the slave cylinder seal moves out and brake fluid runs down into the slave cylinder. The pressure increases when the seal has reached its farthest point.
6.) Remove the pressure/vacuum pump and carefully press in the release bearing to its stop. Note the air bubbles in the plastic hose.
7.) Repeat points 5 to 6 a few times until no air bubbles are visible in the hose.
8.) Leave the slave cylinder seal in its innermost position. Drain and remove the plastic hose.

From your description sounds like you did the slave cylinder already. Maybe the whole hydraulic system needs a bleed? Or did you already do that too?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies everyone. Found out what it was, a small amount of air got into the slave cylinder when I started bleeding the clutch and didn't want to leave. Every time I pressed the clutch it would start moving the piston then just compress the air inside it. :nono;

Managed to bleed the cylinder again by inserting a long (300mm/12") sturdy screwdriver in through the small access port on the front of the box and levering it. When it came to bleeding the rest of the system I just opened the nipple before my mate pressed the pedal down. Wasn't too much of a pain in the **** at all! :evil:

Wulf, don't know why you deleted your post but you very nearly got that photo you wanted, had the rag in my hand when I couldn't find anything to lever the piston in and it looked like I was headed for another gearbox removal. Fortunately for me my mate came along with his car and off to Halfords we went with the trade card. I think I should get shares with the company after this week.

Mike, Sector, thanks for your help too guys, think I just needed the time away from the car and better light to see what was really happening inside the bell housing and to calm down to be honest. A bit frustrating when you spend that much time on a snag and it doesn't go away isn't it!
 

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pug said:
Mike, Sector, thanks for your help too guys, think I just needed the time away from the car and better light to see what was really happening inside the bell housing and to calm down to be honest. A bit frustrating when you spend that much time on a snag and it doesn't go away isn't it!
Verrrrry understandable hahaha
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just got to wait for the ECU to adapt now, being without a battery for a week has killed it and it seems to be in economy mode. Didn't buy the bloody thing to save fuel. :cheesy:


Any ideas how long that takes?
 

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Should adjust it's self after a few hard runs.
 
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pug said:
Wulf, don't know why you deleted your post but you very nearly got that photo you wanted.

I just needed the time away from the car and better light to see what was really happening
I deleted the post because it wasn't really offering any solution.

I had a similar thing with my car when I replaced the turbo. One of the coolant lines was bent a little and I couldn't get the connector back onto the rear of the turbo. I must have tried at least an hour and, along the way, dropped the washers about a hundred times and the exhaust bolts were digging into my arm leaving bruises.. I didn't think of your "rag" solution but I am glad no small children were around because some not-so-nice words were mentioned. :evil: Finally, around 11:00pm I gave up. The next morning, I figured out I could easily remove one of the exhausts bolts, bent the coolant line a little bit in the right way and it was on in a few minutes. Sometimes it's good to step away from the car before doing any serious damage. :cheesy:
 
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