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Saab Mad
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I did rebuild the master cylinder, but it started leaking soon after so I decided to replace it with a new one. My other 900 however has had a leak-free DIY rebuilt master cylinder in it for years.

I think a lot depends on the condition of the cylinder's bore. If it's pitted or excessively worn then a new seal kit won't be any use.

As you already have the seal kit, it's probably worth a go as Connor says.

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Thanks for an excellent tutorial

Matthew: thank you for this excellent piece of documentaion.
This is one of the best show and tell sequences I have seen and will help me out with my current project of ressurecting a beautiful 1990 (rust free) 16V.
I will have to borrow the special clutch tools from my local Saab shop and at least now I know how to use it.
You put all the service manual writers to shame!
Again Thanks for the excellent piece!:D

Alert! New Learning occured accidentally while researching similar clutch cylinder job for my 79 Alfa Spider. The reference recommended "bench bleeding" the cylinders prior to installing. Although not 100% effective, I will give it a try on my 1990 900 since it worked nicely on Alfa.
Since I'm replacing hydraulic line as well (finishing an Automatic to 5 - Speed conversion this week) and will pre-attach line to master and then bench bleed the combination before installing as a unit. Also, my local SAAB technician said to attach the line to the slave cylinder prior to attaching the plastic clutch cover. In my case, I will need to clean up the brake reservoir and bleed all the brake lines since I have detected a black film in the bottom of the master brake reservoir.
Question: will the pressure bleeding system work with the braking system in the 1990 ABS system? Are there checkvalves in the lines that will make this a pain in the butt?
Thanks
 

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Saab Mad
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Discussion Starter · #44 · (Edited)
Did clutch release bearing replacement on my 8v (not the car featured in the clutch procedure) yesterday.

Previous I've always advised folk that you cannot remove any component of the clutch system at the flywheel without removing them all. Hence, to replace the release bearing, you have to remove pressure plate, friction disc, slave cylinder too.

Well, on Saturday, on my car, I found out that's not the case.

By filing down the pressure plate a touch (just 1mm or so), I could remove the slave cylinder with the release bearing.



You can see where I filed off a small amount of material:


This probably won't work for all cars, because the design of the pressure plate will be different. However, if you're replacing the slave or release bearing, consider going this route. It certainly saved me a lot of time and hassle.

Interestingly, I don't remember thinking that this method was even an option when I did slave cylinder replacement on my T16 (the car featured in the original photos), even though it used the same brand of pressure plate (Bork and Beck).
Rich3Saabs said:
will the pressure bleeding system work with the braking system in the 1990 ABS system?
No. ABS requires a different bleeding procedure. I can't remember what it is, but instructions are here on the forum (see posts by "cdaly") and in Bentley.

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bonnet replacement

I found that I could roll the bonnet onto a five gallon can which is just the right height to allow the forks to seat themselves. Then it hangs by itself.
 

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You can achieve the same effect by filing a small notch in the end of the soft aluminum nose of the slave cylinder.

I used pressure bleeders for years on ABS cars. It was approved at SAAB ABS school in the '80s. They did caution us not to allow the fluid level in the pressure bleeder to get too low. Forcing air in under pressure would require cycling all the ABS valves to get the air out (or so they said).
 

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Quick question

Do you need the saab tool if the slave cylinder is not seized? I am going to get the spring tool to keep the fins on the pressure plate depressed in order to remove the shaft.

I am wonder if you need the spacer ring( the ring hinged in the center) associated with the saab tool to remove it or can I just use a pry bar and a 8mm bolt to remove the shaft.

Instead of a spacer ring can I use just an adjustable wrench to space the entire assembly?

I am doing the clutch this weekend so I want to be confident I know every little detail.
Thanks
 

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See the above posts about removing the slave cylinder by grinding either the pressure plate or filing the slave clinder. Either one only requires a 1/4 inch notch that doesn't damage anything.

If you do that, you can leave the line attached until it is removed from the car. Then a regular wrench will work.
 

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Again thank you very much. Your pictures are excellent and descriptions are perfect.

I will atempt the clutch this weekend.
 

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Bump!!!


Thanks for the tips Matthew! The zip ties worked great for getting the slave assembly back in there. Was giving me a real headache.

I would have had the whole thing done in about 4 hours had it not been for the stupid clutch shaft seal. Took near 4 1/2 hours to get itout!!! The WORST seized seal I've ever had.... and I had a rear main seal on a mustang go bad and it was a pain in the ***, but this one here took the cake!


Well, didn't have time to finish last night, so finishing today.

HOW THE BLOODY HELL do you get the plastic cover back ON????
 

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I've had the engines apart or done clutches on 5 or 6 saabs now and 2 of them have had the plastic cover cut by previous owners. If you cut it through, starting from the back of the engine and go most of the way it seems to give it the extra flex that makes fitting it easier.

I've not cut any myself - i've given them a lot of abuse and bent them a long way and have never broken one yet.
 

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Well, my last attempt was at 10:00pm last night.

After a good night's sleep, I went over at about noon today and it went right on just fine.

Got the whole thing put back together in about an hour.

Runs GREAT now... if you see my post "One area the Bentley is lacking..." you'll see some of the headaches I went through (like the clutch shaft seal taking 4 hours to take out).

I'm very very happy with the results though. I was very afraid I couldn't do it, but I just stuck with it and kept in mind "Its just a car" and it went like pie.
 

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Thanks for the great post - fantastic detail - and the pictures really help as well. The clutch on my '85 is getting a bit "long in the tooth" so I'll likely be replacing it later this spring -

If you've never replaced a clutch on another FWD vehicle (I have, VW GTi Rabbit and a Jetta GLi) you'll never know how GOOD you've got it with the Saab design - no pulling half-shafts and dropping the transmission, no working on your back under the car - that is one sweet bit of engineering!

The only one I've seen anywhere near to being that simple is an old air-cooled VW - where you just pull the engine (four bolts, the throttle cable and one or two electrical connections, if memory serves), pop on the new cluth and pressure plate and bolt the engine back in. All I'd do for them is drop the engine - then a friend and I would pick up the back of the beetle - lift it over the shroud and drop it next to the engine - do the clutch - lift and relocate the car, raise the engine, engage the splines and bolt everything up -

Steve

Steve
 

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Very good post Matthew. Great pics and description. Especially about using the cable ties. It took four hands to get mine back in!

To compress the new clutch plate, I put the new plate and the old plate back to back. Then I ran some m12 threaded bar through the centre and compressed both plates together using some large washers, and m12 nuts. I then used four nails (i think 4"?) to keep it compressed. (I hacked the heads off and bent them into a semi-circular shape, and fitted them using a long nosed pliers)
 

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Hmm, that would border on cheating.

All the searching helped kill some time here at work.
 

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clutch work on '93,900S

I can't tell you how much your step by step clutch repair thread has meant to me.
Now I think I should be able to repair my wife's Saab. I do however have a couple of questions.
1) Is it necessary to replace the slave housing if all I am doing is replacing the throwout bearing?
2) Is it necessary to take out the plates to pull the cylinder that holds the throwout bearing? Can I just pull the slave and cylinder out alone and simply replace the bearing and then reinstall?

My clutch does not have a rubber boot coming from the slave, but rather a plastic, at least it appears to be a hard plastic, ring . I suspect the "O" rings that I ordered must go in there.
As you can probably tell by now, I am shooting in the dark about most of this, but that is how I have learned in the past.
 
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