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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the clutch on my 92 900 S is intermittently working perfectly then not disengaging at all. Foot to the floor and the clutch is dragging and trying to move the car forward, sometimes I can pump it several times and it will work for a little while.

I am not sure if there is a separate fluid reservoir for the clutch or if it shared with the brake system. the brake reservoir is full.

the car has 180,000 miles on it. I think it is the original clutch. The clutch does not slip.

how should I proceed diagnosing this? Do you think its the master cylinder, slave cyclinder? or a worn clutch?

thanks for the help
pete
 

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The clutch uses the same fluid reservoir, but a different master cylinder.
Sounds like you're master cylinder is failing. Possible too that it could be the line to the slave cylinder on the clutch or the slave itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks, I think you are right, its the hydraulics, not the disk or pads.

what order would you repair things in?
I have to take it in as I dont have time to futz with this until may.



thanks
pete
 

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I think it is the slave cylender, but I would start with the clutch master first. To remove it you need to remove the rubber hose that goes between the brake and the clutch masters, then remove the hose that goes to the slave cyllender, then remove the two bolts from under the dash board with a 13 mm socket, then pull out the clevis pin connecting the clutch pedal to the master.

If it is not taking fluid it is less likely to be the hose or the slave. Check the hose carefully, especially the foot or so when it is rubber.
If the master does not fix it, and the hose is o.k., and you are sure you have gotten the air out of the system from your master replacement, then it is the slave.
To replace the slave you need to remove the clutch, pressure plate and slave as a unit. This is actually not as hard as it sounds, and can be done in under an hour by somebody with experience, a little longer for a first timmer.
 

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work out first where its leaking from... no point taking out components that arent faulty :roll: when my master cylinder went, there was no apparent loss of fluid from the resovoir... only as described below



if its the master cylinder, you will probably see or be able to feel some fluid soaking into the the foam padding in the upper part of the footwell on the LEFT side of the car (drivers in the US for you)

if its the pipe, you will probably see the leak quite clearly, somewhere along the pipe itself... all the pipe is visible, it doesnt dissapear behind anything

if its the slave, you will see a gunky mess around the front of the clutch, having first taken off the bell housing cover

at the very least, if you can identify where its leaking from, if you cant do the repair yourself, you can cut the potential costs of taking it to the garage and have him spending 4 hours working it all out ;)

G
 

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Normally I would suggest a methodic approach to find the specific components that may be at fault. In a car of this age, I would start with the cheaper, easier fixes and work my way up to more labor intensive and expensive, as I stated above. If a particular clutch component happened to be working during the diagnostics, that's not to say that it is not nearing the end of its life, and will fail next week or next month. I like to fix problems and be done with them, improving the overall reliability of the vehicle.
 

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so what are you suggesting...?
both the slave and master cylinder are just about as easy/complicated as each other, and cost around the same (£50 slave vs £60 master).....

that would leave the pipe, which is the easier of the jobs, but from your post it seems that in order to "fix things and be done with them", and improve the reliability, do i take it that you would actually do all 3 jobs "and be done with it" (which is what i did recently while I swapped the gearbox.... new master, slave, pipe, pressure & friction plates, pilot and release bearings)

just trying to clarify things for PJBALDES

G
 

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dasander said:
Normally I would suggest a methodic approach to find the specific components that may be at fault. In a car of this age, I would start with the cheaper, easier fixes and work my way up to more labor intensive and expensive, as I stated above. If a particular clutch component happened to be working during the diagnostics, that's not to say that it is not nearing the end of its life, and will fail next week or next month. I like to fix problems and be done with them, improving the overall reliability of the vehicle.
And that's what you do on your own car then do you? Wow, it must be just like new then! All new shiny parts.

Find the component which has failed and then fix/replace it.

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I suggested starting with the master and examining the pipe at the same time. If the pipe were bad he would replace it with the master. He said nothing about leaking fluid or adding fluid (both tell tale signs of a bad slave).

Maybe it is just the master and the slave is ok. The master is cheaper and far easier to replace. If the master is replaced and the problem still exists, well then it is time for a slave. It is foolish to replace just the slave and not the master as the master often goes soon after the slave (why would they not be equilly worn). It makes sense to start with the master (and check the pipe too) before replacing the slave.
If it is just the master the car will be back in service, and he should know that the slave is probably on borrowed time and it is time to think about a clutch job.
 

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if you are going under the impression that having replaced a master cylinder, and the salve is on borrowed time, why not just do the slave as well then, and avoid the "is it going to give up on me at night, in the rain, when im in a rush, and on my own" lottery?

pjbaldes, if you are on a budget (workshop time = extra costs) or in a rush to get the car reliable again, i would in the first instance, refer you back to what matthew suggested and eliminate one or the other component by clamping the rubber part of the pipe that leaves the slave cylinder, and look to see what happens ;)

its this bit (exits the front of the clutch from left to right, the drops downwards) however the rubber section of the pipe is just out of view


here you can see the rubber section clamped


G
 

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Pics look familiar :D.

avoid the "is it going to give up on me at night, in the rain, when im in a rush, and on my own" lottery?
Been there done that and its rubbish waiting on a tow home.

Ive had a bit of a saga with the clutch in the last year. Got a few months out of just bleeding it ( always worth a try ). Then i rebuilt the master and got two weeks out of that ( wouldnt recommend rebuilting slave or master if there old ) Then bit the bullet and replaced the master for the slave to go 2 months later. 4 months on from that the replaced slave blow and left me stranded, got a new one and also replaced the pressure plate and friction disc.

In the short term you can bleed the clutch, but chances are if its original components then its time for a change as previously mentioned when you put a new slave or mastercylinder in it will push with a bit more pressure and quite quickly fluid will get past the seals of the most worn parts.

I got by for a while with a spare tyre and Ezibleed and some spare brake/clutch fluid but its not really a reliable way to go about motoring.

Seems to be a good year for clutch problems been quite a lot of posts about them. I know Albert Trouts been having a bit of bother with his slave, and his clutch has been bothering him too buudum tissssshhhhhhh. :eek::D
 

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drg23 said:
yeah, but they're a bit big ;)
And take a whole day to load ;)

Bawheid said:
Ive had a bit of a saga with the clutch in the last year. Got a few months out of just bleeding it ( always worth a try ). Then i rebuilt the master and got two weeks out of that ( wouldnt recommend rebuilting slave or master if there old ) Then bit the bullet and replaced the master for the slave to go 2 months later. 4 months on from that the replaced slave blow and left me stranded, got a new one and also replaced the pressure plate and friction disc.
Is that on my old red 2dr? :eek: The slave and master were less than a year old when you bought it :eek: OE-spec Lockheed parts too!

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Nope not on the two door, on the 3 door ive got. The two doors clutch is still the best feeling clutch ive had in any Saab. :cool:
 
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