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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I bought my Saab a couple months ago, it had a very slow oil leak coming from the camshaft (where the distributor would be mounted if it had one) I finally got around to sealing it with RTV silicone a week or two ago, but it had obviously been left unattended for a while before I got it. Quite a lot of oil seems to have been baked on to the side of the engine and transmission, as well as the engine compartment. It's not pretty to look at, and I'm worried about it clogging up the works (even if it might inhibit corrosion somewhat.) However, I have no idea what to do. I was wondering if there's perhaps some sort of solvent I could wipe it down with, which wouldn't damage any rubber hoses or metal?
 

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Get some spray engine cleaner at the local auto parts or discount store. Spray it on, hose it off. If using a hose isn't possible, you could wipe it with rags.

Brush heavy deposits if you can with a small brush... and old toothbrush works well. Don't get teh electronics of the car wet if you use a hose - keep spray away from electrical boxes and the DIC on top of the engine. Spray down and on the sides only.
 

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I've cleaned so many engines and bays it's not funny.

My choice is purple power. You have to cut this stuff cause it's potent.
A couple of old toothbrushes and and a water hose to rinse. Not pressure though. After it's clean and dry I use tire foam to moisten and shine everything that been cleaned.

What actually works better and lasts longer is wd-40, but years ago they changed the spray nozzle from a mist to more of a stream. The wd-40 can be sprayed into a spray bottle if it must be used. <Ramble

To do this right it does take a bit of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've cleaned so many engines and bays it's not funny.

My choice is purple power. You have to cut this stuff cause it's potent.
A couple of old toothbrushes and and a water hose to rinse. Not pressure though. After it's clean and dry I use tire foam to moisten and shine everything that been cleaned.

What actually works better and lasts longer is wd-40, but years ago they changed the spray nozzle from a mist to more of a stream. The wd-40 can be sprayed into a spray bottle if it must be used. <Ramble

To do this right it does take a bit of time.
So are you saying that WD-40 is the best solution?
 

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So are you saying that WD-40 is the best solution?
Note that he's just using that for the shine afterwards. It is actually a fairly good grease softener and remover, but it's a little expensive to use like that.

Gunk is a good brand of spray cleaner, but most of them work. I used the no name brand last time and it was just as good. You should leave the hood open for a while afterwards so that it can dry. Only issues I know of anyone causing and people who hosed down their electronics and ended up waiting a couple days for everything to dry out and a guy who hosed his DIC and filled the chambers underneath with water.

Just be careful with the spray and don't sweat it... easy job.
 

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So are you saying that WD-40 is the best solution?
Just for shining, not for cleaning.

P.P., a few rags, toothbrush, water and a bit of time you can have a clean engine.
 

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Is dish soap alright to use for the "elbow grease" route?
Sure... it's just more work. Dish soap, some water, a brush, that will work. The only problem with an engine is that there are usually areas you can't scrub, and the dish soap isn't strong enough to remove the grime in there without some brushing.
 

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Is dish soap alright to use for the "elbow grease" route?
A bit weaker than purple power, but it'll work.

I forgot to add, for really thick and tough grime the power and pressure of brake cleaner is amazing.
 
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