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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear all,

I have saab 900 OG, `89, 8V i, B201 engine

Have taken off the valve cover to see the wear of timing chain. What I saw was chain very tight, not possible to move it on the upper gear. It seems so tight that does not look like worn chain.

However, the tensioner which is one of the old designe, that is bolted on withnin the chain space and not tghe one which is going through the engine body, it is extended ~ 11-12 mm.

I know that the temsioner that bplts throug the engine body may be extended max 12 mm which shows worn chain.

But what about this one? It bolts on on two bolts in the chain compartment.
Does anybody knows the max extension that indicates worn chain?
Chain seems so tight, also the those vertical chain leaders does not seem to be worn ...

If the chain is worn, shouldn`t it be loose and slacking?
What to do in my case, should I change it or shoyuld I change the gears and the chain?

Please, see the attached photo, the matter is urgent.

Thank`s a lot!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Matthew,


You think that 12 mm is max also for the old tensioner that I got on my 8 V? The chain is so tight ... and isn`t there any chance to change the gears and the chain while engine still in the car OR it is 100 % engine out job?

Thanks!
 

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KurBads said:
You think that 12 mm is max also for the old tensioner that I got on my 8 V?
After thinking about it more, I am now very unsure!

The tensioner you describe doesn't match what I had thought was the old-style. Odd, as I'd have thought a 1989 engine would have the newer-style tensioner.

The Saab service manual is no help either. Sorry :(

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank`s,


still waiting for somebody to shed light on that, Yes i don`t have tensioner that screws in the engine block but the one that is attached with twoo small screws from inside.

Please, help!
 

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I had a H engine in a 99GL 5 speed (about 20 years ago ;oops: ). The single roller chain only drives the camshaft. The B engine picture above drives a jackshaft to water pump etc as well.
The original H had a 'spring bow' chain tensioner. The chain guide on that side was sprung towards the chain by a tension coil spring. This is pictured in the 99 engine manual for 1982. I'll scan this when I get my scanner connected.
There was some problem with this spring bow design. My 84 99 had the chain guide sprung by a 'conventional' plunger tensioner as your picture. I suspect this was a dealer recall, or maybe just the later cars had the conventional design.
As to what is acceptable wear, I'm afraid I can't help - the manuals I have don't cover this tensioner arrangement, and the 99 manual doesn't give any help at all. You could try calling in at the dealers and see what they know.
I'd be tempted to take the pragmatic view and leave it alone if it's tight and quiet. Being a chain rather than a belt, it'll make a lot of noise long before it breaks.
Fred
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thank`s for advice, i am thinking that tight chain will stay as it is ...

nutcase, i see that your picture also shows rather far extended tensioner, was that also when chain on?
 

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Sorry can't find any further info :( I'm sure somewhere I had mention of that type. All the components were almost new on that engine, so when it was all together there was hardly any extension of the tensioner.
 

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actually you won't see any slack in the chain unless you remove the timing
cover (engine out (I think)) The chain is tight between the two cam sprockets
and also tight between the crank sprocket and the exhaust cam. The only place
the chain will be slack is between the inlet cam and the crank sprocket. The
slack on that side is taken up by the tensioner [and guide] pressing against the
chain - see the photo above for an idea of how that works.
 
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