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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Oil leak from main pulley, after done with the works, car is now hard to start. I've to depress gas pedal a bit to help the start. However, if i off and on engine in very short span ( in few seconds to few minutes), the car can start easily without having to depress the gas pedal. I suspect i've done something wrong when removing/fitting the parts.
 

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Not sure how an oil leak from a pully affects starting at this point 'Mr. Bond' (James....Bond? heh). Can you elaborate on what was done to address this?

Outside of considering an oil leak, my first two guesses are:
1. Throttle position sensor going bad
2. Temperature sensor going bad

Might even be an oxegen sensor. Do you have any CEL's (check engine light) codes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tried again this morning to tighten up the parts which dismantled earlier and took out the negative side of the battery ( to reset, i'm trying my luck). No CEL thus far and it managed to start without depressing gas pedal this morning. Will post again for any new development, thanks.
 

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My first response was "Idle Air Control Valve" (AIC) After much thought, I may retract that assessment. I am not 100% sure what all you did to your engine but if I would look at all of the vacuum connections and see if you missed something. I would like to hear a more detailed explanation of the "no start" symptoms. Does it just turn over? Does it "Belch or chug"? Did you do any work on the turbo? Are you sure it's spinning freely? Did you have the IAC out? Was it reinstalled properly?

As for the oil leak, it sounds like the front crankshaft oil seal. Pretty easy to swap out.
 

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I think turbo related issues are out of the question for a 900 S. I agree with the IAC part if it's surging without pressing on the gas pedal or he forgot to plug in the power to it. Maybe didn't plug in the MAF sensor? I've done that but oddly my car still ran....poorly
 

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I've had MAF sensors go and had similar issues, especially on start up. If it is the MAF 10 to 1 you will get a CEL after you drive 50 miles or so...
Tom
 

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Other than the usual things to check, which includes the vacuum lines, I'd check them for being improperly routed and connected. There is a small diagram in the engine bay which may help.
With these newer fuel injection systems, depressing the throttle may cause a hard start.
This is where I would start.
 

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...
With these newer fuel injection systems, depressing the throttle may cause a hard start.
This is where I would start.
Right you are sir! A guy at work had that problem with his wife's Saturn (1st gen SL). She kept pumping the 'gas' and it actually let the injectors dump a bunch of fuel in just like the good ol' days w/ carburettors. A lot of jumping the battery and leaving the foot off the gas worked wonders.
 

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I'm happy it works for you, however to the best of my knowledge with the Motronic System (the non-turbo ECM), on starup the injectors pulse at the same time, the same amount, until the engine is at acceptable RPMs. What pressing the gas pedal does is open up the throttle-body butterfly, allowing more air into the mixture IF your AIC is closed. I'm going to say clean your AIC and check your Mass airflow sensor. Your problem does not lie in the fuel injectors 20 to 1. If it IS fuel related, check to see if there is fuel in your vacuum line that leads to the fuel pressure regulator. If this is the case, then your FPR is bad, once again, not likely.

My vote is if you clean the AIC it should start better, if not test with a known good MAF.

Tom
 

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So when you press on the gas pedel the ECU does not allow the injectors to fire depending on where the TPS is telling the ECU where the butterfly to the TB is at and also depending on what position the IAC is open to? If so, then I would say no flooding could occur. If not, then I would say some amount of unburnt gas will stay in the cylinders when the car isn't properly running. I don't know how much the 02 sensors play a part in the cycle (Short Term Fuel Trim?) but would assume they do and the ECU would briefly adjust the injectors to shorten their pulse cycle.

I'm not saying you're wrong about your troubleshooting, KaMiKaZi_t0M. I'm just saying that to me a fuel injected car can still flood itself (just not nearly as insane as the old carb days w/ the accelerator pump).

In short, listen to KaMiKaZi_t0M for the next logical steps for a solution.
 

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Hey I'm an armature, I just give the best knowledge I can. You can absolutely flood a FI engine, especially if you don't have spark. I flood my C900 all the time (distributor problem :cheesy:), however it isn't done by the depression of the pedal during start up, it is done by cranking for long periods of time without without spark and the cylinder walls being coated with fuel.

Tom
 

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I know that on my 1.5L 3-cylinder Sea Doo, that holding the throttle wide-open puts it in "drowned mode". When that occurs, there is no spark or gas to cylinders until the throttle is released... Ron
 
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