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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well To make this short the car is a 2004 SS 4door, and it will not start all of a sudden. It does click when trying to start , all the lights and radio work fine but no cranking. Could this be the Neutral switch or somthing? There is a check engine light on also. I do not think autozone can check these type of cars I did do a search for it. Please help thanks.
 

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jump it

I would give it a jump...start it up and run it around...then turn it off and let it rest and see if it starts up again. A bad alternator will not start up again. A bad battery will probably start with a short rest, but not a longer one.

beren
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
mmmm

Ok I Will try the battery, and yes , I am sure it is the original battery. I will also try to jump it and see if that works. What else could I ry when I am doing other things?:D

Also what do you mean by reset, do you mean reseting the computer in the car or somthing differnet. I know a good amount about cars in general but the saab is somthing I have not messed with. That is why I ask for help. I did use the search button if anyone ask.:D
 

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I would actually recommend against jumping the car. These cars have lots of very sensitive electronics in them, and there have been instances of people damaging things by a simple jump start. A trickle charger is much safer (albiet probably harder to come by quickly).

Try this: take a multimeter and measure the voltage across the battery terminals. 12.6 and above indicates a fully charged battery. 12.4 represents about a 75% charge. Anything below 12.0V is discharged, and anything 10.5V or less indicates a bad cell. My guess is a new battery will solve your problem.
 

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I agree with malibu. I have read about people trashing their AMP1 under the left hand front seat by jump starting the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes the battery thing sound good to try first, I can use a meter I have for that and test it out. Thanks for all the help.
 

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Although I can't fault checking the battery with a meter, it still seems prudent to replace these Saab OEM batteries once you start having ANY kind of electrical trouble, particularly once they are more than 3 years old.

This is probably the single most common cause of car trouble reported here-- bad Saab OEM battery.
 

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As I always do in this type of thread Ill say again. Don't eliminate a bad battery even if you try to jump it and it won't start. I was told that in any cells go bad in the oem it won't even jump.

And that was the case with mine. Would'nt jump went to autozone bought a new battery and presto everything was fine.
 

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I agree it is 98% the battery that needs replacing and jumping wont do any good, could even damage.

But I fail to understand whe we all bi*ch/complain about OEM batteries. I imagine that all modern batteries with the "strain" that all our electronics put on them have a life of 3 to 4 years and no more.
 

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DavidMorgan said:
But I fail to understand whe we all bi*ch/complain about OEM batteries. I imagine that all modern batteries with the "strain" that all our electronics put on them have a life of 3 to 4 years and no more.
brianl703 is the battery expert.

The stock battery is Exide, I believe. I never had one of those before. Every other battery I've purchased has given me at least 5 years of good service, meaning I didn't replace it until I had a problem in the 6th year. And it's not like I've been tryin'. I usually buy batteries rebranded by the auto parts store.

Some of these Saab batteries are not making it to year 3!
 

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Malibu said:
A trickle charger is much safer (albiet probably harder to come by quickly).
A 15 amp charger will charge the battery enough to start the car in about 5 to 15 minutes if the battery is good. This won't hurt the car either.
 

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JonV said:
To get a true and accurate reading with a meter any battery must have a load on it.
With a lead-acid battery open-circuit voltage does correlate to state-of-charge. There's just a couple of caveats: A freshly-charged battery can show a high false reading (called a surface charge). A worn battery can show 100% charged (about 12.6V) even though it no longer has the capacity to turn over an engine.

The OEM battery does have a hydrometer "eye" which should tell you if the battery is charged (at least in that one cell). Believe it will also tell you if the battery water level has dropped below the bottom of the hydrometer eye, too (in which case you should replace the battery).

You can't add water to the OEM battery nor can you check it with a "real" hydrometer.
 

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ctrlz said:
brianl703 is the battery expert.
Well if you say so :)

The stock battery is Exide, I believe.
According to the service manual it is made by Exide. I don't recall seeing anything on the battery itself saying it's made by Exide (or even what country it's made in), though.

When Sears used Exide as the supplier for Diehard batteries about 10 years ago, they had a much higher failure rate than when they used Johnson Controls as the supplier. (For our European readers, Johnson Controls operates in Europe as Varta). Sears switched back to Johnson Controls and the failure rate went down.

I never had one of those before. Every other battery I've purchased has given me at least 5 years of good service, meaning I didn't replace it until I had a problem in the 6th year. And it's not like I've been tryin'. I usually buy batteries rebranded by the auto parts store.
Most car batteries sold in the USA are private label. This is the new trend. Wheras Costco once sold "Energizer" batteries (made by Johnson Controls), now they sell "Kirkland Signature" batteries (also made by Johnson Controls). I don't believe Johnson Controls have ever sold car batteries under their own name.

Exide does sell batteries under their own name, though (Tire Kingdom/NTB sell them if you really want one). But Johnson Controls has a huge share of the private-label market, much larger than Exide.

Some of these Saab batteries are not making it to year 3!
I bought a Harbor Freight load tester just so when the inevitable Saab battery failure happens, I'll know for sure it's the battery. I hope that I can periodically do a load test to see if the battery is starting to degrade before it fails entirely. I've noticed on other cars that if you are attentive enough you can tell that the engine is cranking slower than it did before and get the battery replaced before you're stranded.
 

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My battery made it all of 1 year and 2 months.
 

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Anyone have thoughts on occasional trickle charges to help maintain the battery? Have a friend who insist that hooking your battery up to a trickle charger once a month will help with battery life. I always thought this is un-necessary as the car should be giving the battery all that it needs. Could maybe see the point when you needed to check water levels and maintain your battery. Our new battery expert have anything to say about this :lol: ?
 

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A trickle charger won't hurt and may help as long as it's voltage-regulated. An unregulated trickle charger could put too much voltage into the battery and cause it to lose more water than normal. In general what you want is usually called a battery maintainer or float charger.

As far as checking water levels it's still a good idea to do that once a year or so, particularly in hot climates, if your battery allows it. Unfortunately the Saab OE battery does not. It, however, slowly loses water just like any other wet-cell battery--the difference is that you can't add it back. So it slowly fails when it loses enough water and the plates are exposed to air.

Just about any replacement for the Saab OE battery you buy in the USA (with the exception of AC Delco, and I've never seen a group 48 AC Delco battery for sale anywhere; allegedly they exist, according to the AC Delco website) will allow you to add water to it if you so desire.

You still have the option of treating these batteries that allow you to add water as a maintenance-free battery and never check or add water to them. In that case they will last just as long as a maintenance-free battery would. However, you can extend the life of the battery by adding water when it is low, particularly in a hot climate.
 
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