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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

This is my rear rotor (other side looks the same):

279408


Do i need to rebuild my calipers, or just simply replace the pads and rotors?

Many thanks
Greg
 

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Hard to tell from just one photo. Looks like "simply replace the pads and rotors". Possibly the incorrect size brake pad was used? The calipers appear to be doing their job. Not sure what resources you have available. If the rotors are in pretty good shape (still thick, lots of metal), you might be able to get them "turned". Most people don't bother with that anymore and just buy new rotors. Also, harder to find a place that "turns" rotors, these days. Whether or not that can be done depends on the thickness of the rotor and how much is worn away. They'll measure them at the facility prior to turning. I still have that option, where I live, and the cost is only about 30% of new rotors. Either way, pads and rotors for sure!
 

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They look fine.I suggest you only replace if pads are worn.
Why fix something that is functioning properly.?
 

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The inner and outer band of rust/corrosion, shown in the photo, is not what you want to see. Especially prior to installing new pads. It looks like the friction material of the old pads is only contacting about 60% of the rotor surface. Could be normal, but doesn't look "right", to me. The corrosion bands are raised relative to the shiny friction surface. The new pads will partially ride on the rough, raised portion as the friction material is bigger, dimensionally, than the worn friction material you're replacing. This could chip/crack/damage your brand new pads. You could try and "knock down" the raised corroded bands with a file or sanding disc. But, it's a PITA and takes a long time. Wear a respirator/dust mask if you attempt this. Also, keep in mind, the inner surface of the rotor looks exactly like the outer.
Your choice of course. I would strongly recommend NOT putting new pads on those rotors as they appear in the photo.
 

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Seeing rust rings on rotors with age is relatively normal. Not so normal is the size of the top rust ring. Where I'm from in the US our area is considered a rust belt state and we frequently see rotors with rust rings. Especially given the rears are changed less frequently than the fronts.

Pad contact patch does appears to be a bit small so when you replace, make sure you confirm what brake options your car has to order the correct parts. How do I determine proper brake disc size? Now I'm not a 9-5 guru so this link applies to 9-3s. If there's a resource available online that has the same info for 9-5s definitely take a look at it before ordering parts!

Also, I initially thought these calipers would twist in not realizing we're talking og9-5. They do not twist. I should have caught the different style rotor hat in the pic but was entranced by the rust. Thank you EdT for the correction.
 

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Sorry, that is a frequently used saying where I'm from. Long winded explaination is it applies to northern states in the US surrounding Lake Erie where steel mills used to be. Technically, the reference came from steel mills shutting down leaving towns abandoned/weathered like rust. In sum, rust destroys things like the steel mills leaving the areas.

Since then it's also been applied to states that see a lot of salt and brine on the roads which rusts out vehicles. The point above I was trying to make is where there is salt or other treatments on the road to prevent ice on the roadways severely corrodes/rusts vehicles. Obviously this can happen in any location of the world, I just happend to use my local terminology/saying without realizing it lol.
 

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Unfortunately, I'm all too familiar with and well aware of what "Rust belt" means. I'm also in the rust belt. :eek: Pittsburgh native, wife from Erie (we live in Pgh). Automotively speaking, "Rust belt" is also a reference to areas that use road salt in the winter. This wreaks havoc on the undercarriage/steel of cars. Makes simple repairs a nightmare and drastically shortens the lifespan of any vehicle. The OP never made mention of the rust belt. The national flag, by his screen name, is Hungary. If he's there, not sure they have a rust belt? Probably don't even have road salt, much less salt trucks.
Yes, the rust bands are normal. However, they seem unusually large on this example. Something doesn't "look" right. If correct pads, that brake rotor could have been a lot smaller...... My guess, wrong pads.
 

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Semantics my friend.. rust is rust wherever in the world it's found or how it comes about. I'll elaborate more on the actual topic at hand here.

Based on the singular included pic and no mention of serious braking issues, just visual inspection/concern by OP, nothing in my personal uneducated opinion jumps out as alarming. Obviously theres no good angle of pad thickness or wear but seeming how rotor is not entirely gouged, I'd guesstimate there's some pad material left. Also doesn't appear to have rotor glazing, which if it did may indicate a sticking caliper. Who knows if warped though.

Like I previously mentioned, top rust ring does appear to be excessively large and brings about the question if those are the correct rotors, pads, calipers, etc for the car. If it were mine I'd replace pads and rotors at a minimum. If that ring is the only concern I recommend the OP checking out that link in my original post to confirm the correct brake options and go from there. What he/she does with said info is totally up to them.
 

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If you can easily catch the outer edge of the rotor with your finger I would change the rotor & the pads. It's very hard to tell from one picture taken with the wheel in place but relative to the price of a rotor the truth is you may as well do it if there is any question, especially when a warped rotor will then ruin the new brake pads.
 

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Depending on who does the work make sure they know what they're doing as the rear calipers twist in, and will not compress in with a standard C-clamp. I would honestly plan for the worst and order rear calipers as well, and just return them if not needed.
OG9-5 single-piston rear calipers can be pressed back, the parking brake is a drum brake in the hat.

If you can easily catch the outer edge of the rotor with your finger I would change the rotor & the pads. It's very hard to tell from one picture taken with the wheel in place but relative to the price of a rotor the truth is you may as well do it if there is any question, especially when a warped rotor will then ruin the new brake pads.
I agree with this. If the ridge is pretty noticeable, the rotors are worn anyway and should be replaced. Made in EU Saab OEM rotors work well.

The calipers are fine, though.

Be aware that you might have to fiddle with the parking brake shoes to get the rotors off. Unfortunately Saab did not use different threading on each side, so the direction that loosens the parking brake on one side will tighten it on the other. You also need to use quite a sharp-edged screwdriver. I tried to use a worn screwdriver with a slightly rounded blade edge, and it would not turn the adjusting screw.

What I would recommend is jacking the rear up before removing the wheels, spinning both of them to make sure the spin freely, then applying the parking brake and making sure that both wheels lock up tight. If so, your parking brake is working fine. Otherwise, you might as well make any fixes to that while you are changing rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes the rotors have a "thick" rusty outer edge.
Parking brake is fine, i already ordered a brand new set of rotors and pads, so i will replace them on the weekend. :)
 
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