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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
bottom line: No communications with any ECU module on the I-bus
tech2 clone with 148.0 software
2006 9-3 Aero
I had a problem for several months with the ABS module causing a no-crank, no-start, and jumpered the connector for several months. Then the car ceased starting. Then it sat over most of 2020. Car has a new AGM battery.
I bought a replacement ABS module and installed it. Didn't work. Sent the the original ABS module to XeModex for repair. Swapped in the original. Car continues no-crank, no-start.
T2clone arrived last week. Once connected, the T2C gets various errors:
No comm or lost comm with ECU: CIM, line 377
No bus systems can be contacted on any bus.
It is not possible to communicate with any ECUs included in your selection.
Wrong vehicle or model year selected.
No communications with vehicle; Check Diagnostic Link Connector
Response Test, CIM, all errors

Based on what I am seeing, it appears that there is a communications error on the I-bus.
I have pulled out and checked all of the fuses under the hood and next to the steering wheel.
I am still trying to get my WinXP32 machine installed.

What should I do next?
 

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Check the pins on the DLC & make sure there are no loose connections. As for me, my CANDI module was no good & I had to purchase another (the seller of the clone was useless as expected). This fixed all of my connection problems.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How did you determine and verify that the CANdi module was at fault?
 

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There is a procedure to test the bus systems via voltage at the DLC. I did this, determined they were all as should be. My OBDII readers also both work flawlessly, which further confirmed that finding. From there the Candi module would not communicate consistently (you can test this as a function on the techII). I did take it apart and tried resoldering all connections but had no luck. Another Candi module and it works flawlessly.

FWIW you need security access from a computer to perform most functions but this has no impact on the ability of the techII to connect and read system codes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I have been having trouble with my BlueDriver connecting properly to the OBD2.
If you could point me to the voltage test on the DLC, that would be great.
I will have to check my BlueDriver again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Blue Driver app finds the device, but does not connect, if the ABS connector is plugged in to the module. It does connect if the ABS module is disconnected and the connector is jumpered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have tested with two ABS modules; one of which just came back from XeModex with a professional repair completed. This leads me to be skeptical of the idea that both modules are bad. I have tested with BlueDriver and Tech2clone. Both devices fail communication with the ECUs. I have checked every fuse I can find. The Response Test indicates that all of the P-bus units, Amp1, Amp2, Front CD Changer, CIM-P all respond and all of the I-bus items fail, from the CIM-I to everything else. This leads me to believe there is a flaw on the I-bus.
 

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Disconnect ur instrument cluster and ur ACM, then check if u have comm with the CIM at least
 

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This is a middling example of the testing done at the DLC


There is a much better page which explains the process in 7 - 10 steps but I'm having trouble finding it.

To be clear (I want to make sure I didn't misinterpret your original post) this is to test for connection between the code reader and the DLC/OBDII connector by ensuring there are no shorts. Before I settled that it must be the Candi module I was basically at the point of finding someone else to try to connect their unit to my car to be sure whether it was a module from the car or from the techII. Since the Candi module fixed my issues I didn't dig into how to test components within each specific bus system. Depending on your location finding someone that can use a known good techII may be worth your time, as it is unlikely but not impossible for 2 ABS units to be non-functioning.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I will run a search, but is there a list of where each of the modules are physically located and a checklist for going through them? the attached image was posted to the original thread, which is helpful. The terse location descriptions seem insufficient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Instrument cluster = MIU / Main Instrument Unit 540 "in front of driver in instrument panel"
ACM = Airbag Control Module 331 "on the center tunnel behind the gear selector unit"
Vagueish at best.
 

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the network has a:
1. gateway (CIM)
2. In series connected modules (MIU, ACM, UEC, REC, ICM, BCM)
3. parallel connected modules ( AHM, DDM, PDM, SPA, SRM, RLDM, RRDM, SLM, ACC)

The first modules connected to the gateway are MIU & ACM, and they are in series on the network, that mean if u disconnect them u loose communication with anything connected past them, so if u disconnect them and u r still unable to talk to the I-bus, then u either have a bad CIM, scantool or a wiring issue (mostly a backed out pin in the DLC).
if communication is restored, then u know u have smthn going on down the network, so u connect back one say MIU, and check again, u try to corner the issue between two modules that are in series connected to the network name them module X & Y, then u disconnect modules that are connected in parallel between those X & Y while checking for com until u find the problematic module or if non then u r left with either X or Y being bad.
Note that some modules cant be disconnected because of their importance, these u leave as last resort (e.g UEC)

hope that explain the diagnosis .
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I followed a video for removing the center console panel on the driver's side. I can't see any connectors for a module.
I have no idea how to access the MIU.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
1. gateway (CIM)
2. In series connected modules (MIU, ACM, UEC, REC, ICM, BCM)
3. parallel connected modules ( AHM, DDM, PDM, SPA, SRM, RLDM, RRDM, SLM, ACC)
Trying to decode all of these abbreviations.
CIM - Column Integrated Module - on the steering column underneath the steering wheel and airbag, remove both to get access..
MIU - Main Instrument Unit - inside the instrument cluster, remove the air vents, the dash bezel, and more to get access for disonnect
ACM - Airbag Control Module, inside the center console on the body floor, in front of the shift lever, remove at least one side panel, maybe a seat and the entire center console to access
UEC - Underhood Electrical Center, AKA the fuse box
REC - Rear Electrical Center ?
ICM - Ignition Control Module, where the key goes into
BCM - Body Control Module, under drivers dash ?

AHM
DDM
PDM
SPA
RLDM
RRDM
SLM
ACC - Air Conditioner Control module,
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
It seems rather excessively ridiculous to have all of these computer modules in this car, tucked behind a dozen different panels, screws, locks, and other items, and the engineers never thought to design the system so that it could show you what is working and not working unless you unplug each one individually. That is messed up.
 

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Dont follow WIS removal instructions blindly, u need only access to their connectors just to disconnect.
When touching any airbag components, disconnect battery and wait few minutes.
 
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