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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took the plastic cover off the engine of my 1999 9-3, just to investigate after the Check Engine Light went on.
Auto part Fuel line Vehicle Engine Car

Auto part Fuel line Engine Vehicle Car

I had tromped the gas, and the turbo engaged, accelerating the car. The next day, the Check Engine Light went on.
I found the connection to the smaller of two hoses on this connector was broken.
I am guessing that the two pronged plastic connection to the back of the engine is some kind of sensor, and that is the reason the Check Engine Light went on.
Does anyone know what the name of this connector is (I do not have a shop manual, and the Owner's Manual has no pic of this part of the engine.
I am hoping someone can tell me what the name of this connector is, and provide some advice as to how to replace it myself (once I have purchased a replacement part) - any indication as to how easy it would be to remove the broken part and replace with new one, will be greatly appreciated.

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Thats the PCV nipple and quite frankly doesnt need to be there. I unknowingly drove with mine broken for at least a month.
 

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a - Valve cover bushing #7515190
b - PCV nipple #9165903
c - Rubber hose #9189465
d - Generic 4-mm rubber hose, NAPA H-459, or silicone hose etc.
e - PCV check valve #7521313

Since the pic above shows a red ignition module, I assume the p/n's apply to this car.

Opinions on what needs to be there vary, but there is often no noticable performance hit when it breaks.

If it is functionning correctly, during steady speeds the vacuum in the throttle body helps to pull oil fumes out of the crankcase and from under the valve cover, and the one way valve is there to prevent the opposite flow of air when the turbo creates overpressure in the intake.

To put it simply, when the intake is at vacuum, engine fumes flow from the valve cover into the intake. When the intake is at boost pressure, the turbo creates vacuum at its intake and engine fumes flow the other way (therefore the fork in the nipple), to a point between the air cleaner and the turbo.

If you choose to replumb the PCV system, you have to make sure you don't create a vacuum leak or a boost leak, and maintain some kind of breather in the valve cover. See link to Vacuum Lines for more details.

If keeping the old check valve, make sure it is still working, they often stick open inside, and create a passthrough for boost into the top of the engine, which is generally not good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Will broken check valve cause Check Engine Light to go on?
And can I just remove check valve from the camshaft cover, and replace, and reconnect?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Replaced the nipple for PCV.

Many thanks for the advice:
I purchased new valve nipple and replaced the broken one - also ordered new grommet, hoses and PCV valve.
Just to check if all was in proper order, and that I understood exactly what to do, I replaced the nipple, after extracting the broken nipple and disconnecting the hoses.
What I did discover, besides the broken nipple, was that the service mechanic hadn't used the grommet when inserting the nipple. Typical incorrect maintenance..
All is in place, and will replace old PCV valve and hoses when they arrive from GM warehouse.
But the Check Engine Light is on - this has happened before and when checked using the hand computer, the codes indicated no problem.
The last time this happened was when I filled up in the US and used gas with 15% ehanol. This time the light went on when I goosed the gas pedal, and opened the turbocharger.
Hopefully, with no error message on the hand computer analysis, no harm has been done by the broken nipple, and the new PCV valve will solve everything.
If anyone has some ideas otherwise, please let me know.
Much appreciation for the feedback.
 

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Have you gotten the codes read yet? Check the rest of the hoses while you have that cover off...I know that I had a vacuum hose slip off the MAP sensor and it gave me a generic code for high engine idle (don't remember the number off-hand, but I made a thread about it).

I had that PCV guy disconnected for a long while without really knowing anything was up. Only difference I noticed when I finally fixed it was that my idle was a little lower (which was good, it was a little over 1k rpms previously).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks:

I will review info from mechanic re code - I just remember that mechanic said it was generic code, not much information, and nothing was wrong. Then used computer to reset CEL.

All was ok until I blipped turbo last week.

When I popped cover, I found PCV nipple was broken and connection to PCV valve was broken.

Replaced nipple, and cleaned connections - will have new hoses and PCV valve in week.

I found that the mechanic hadn't installed nipple with grommet - wondered if that would make a difference, and also started doubting mechanic - did he really replace PCV valve (so ordered new one just to be cautious).

I will pop cover again and check MAP connection.

I figured that by replacing broken nipple, turbo sensor woulld restore check engine light after 40-50 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Found out one very important thing - even if you have the best mechanics, it's up to you to check that little things, like the fuses, are in working order.
After all the hassle regarding the Check Engine light, I replaced the PCV Valve, nipple and tubes, and the light went off - for a week. Then it returned, much to my consternation.
Since I had planned a road trip, I decided to check out more possibilities for the warning, and check out why the center console stack had turned dark since my last visit to the mechanic - I had presumed a bulb went out, but the explanation was more bazaar.
I opened the fuse box at the driver side of the dash, and started taking out each fuse to inspect it. I found 2 fuses that were burned, so I replaced them, and despite the extra (surplus/replacement) fuses still titting in their proper slots, I found three fuses were missing, one of the missing fuses was for the central console stack - the second I turned on the engine, with the fuse inserted, all the lights went out.
Unfortunately, I am not sure which 2 additional fuses had been missing, but having replaced the fuses, the engine light hasn't glowed in weeks.
The question is? Why would fuses suddenly go missing? Or why would supposedly experienced mechanics remove fuses, and not replace them?
 

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It stands to reason that if a "mechanic" doesn't bother with the important PCV system grommet, he will also neglect having all the fuses in place.
I was a mechanic for nigh 10 years, we do have our problems; and there are many problems in the field.:(:cry:
Many owners are simply better, having the qualities that mechanics lack.
Working together/cooperating is the better way.:cheesy:
 
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