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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just brought my car home from the dealership yesterday. I haggled the guy down literally a quarter of the asking price (8k to 6k, I'm super proud), and the thing drives like a dream. 73900 miles on it now after driving it literally over a hundred miles yesterday. After some minor coughs from the engine in the first 50 miles, the thing drove like a new car.

Couple of minor issues that need addressing, like I think I broke the switch for the headlights while driving home (don't pull on those, apparently), and the 'corrosion' on the engine turned out to be dirt from a squirrel that tried to live in there for some period of time (I uploaded a picture of the acorn I found).

I'm going to be bringing it to my old gearhead father on Friday, and he's going to teach me to change the oil. Maybe we're both going to be figuring out how to change the oil on this particular car. Either way, I wanted to ask: Now that I have it, how do I take proper care of this car? I heard the turbos have a tendency to go early on these vehicles if you don't take care of them, and that the exhaust system sometimes needs replacing around 100k miles.
 

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Very nice! You have a water cooled, oil lubricated Mitsubishi TE-05 turbo. I think they're typically more reliable than the older oil only turbos, and less susceptible to coking.

Oil changes are easy on these cars. The oil plug is on the left side of the engine, behind the flat head gearbox drain on automatic cars (can't remember if this is an auto). The oil filter can be a pain to remove, but removing the air intake duct makes it a little easier to get to from the top. I use a 10W30 synthetic blend, but a search on the board will reveal anything you would ever want to know about oil.

Enjoy!

Dustin
 

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every car needs it's exhaust changing and I would suggest way before 100k, it's metal and it rusts(unless it's a stainless one etc)Saab or no Saab, give it an oil change and coolant change, then you know that's all taken care of.
Anew dissy cap rotor arm, plugs and leads(if old), and you should be ok,but I would do this with any car I had, as I would never believe what the vendor told me, as you soon realise they tell you 5h1t, when selling a car as they tell you what you want to hear.
when you have driven any journey just always try to let the engine tick over for about 30 secs, just to let the turbo cool down, and it gives the oil and water a chance to cool it down without it cooking the oil in the lines/body of turbo
you pull once on the headlight dip/ raise to operate to full beam(if on low) and then same again to take it back to dipped, so wether the P/O had messed it up so the first time you piull on ity you 'break it' hence comments above, as you would really have to be stupid to pull so hard to break it without realising you were being stupid, yanking on the lever.
 

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Congrats! Looks very nice indeed! While you're fiddling around and learning about these cars, pick up a Bentleys manual (for a 16V).


Or you can check on eBay as well. Don't dig too deep into the car without one!

Also, get a pair of those cheap reader glasses from your favorite local store and high power LED flashlight and give a quick check of the underhood wiring where Mr Squirrel might have been nibbling around.

After you do all of that, enjoy the heck out of it! ;ol;
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Bentley Book was ordered and came! Here is a list of things that were true three days ago:

Radio doesn't turn on
Clock's stopped
Heated seats don't work
Interior lights don't work
Key remove blinks red but the car doesn't respond
Power locks didn't work
Needs an oil change

And then I dove into the fuse boxes, and here's the list now:

Needs an oil change

Right? I hear I need a new grommit for the bolt you take off to drain the oil, which will be a good excuse to get a real headlight switch which I'm at it. The old one works... but is still a bit ganky.

Considering how amazingly well the first swing at working on the car went (I'm pretty sure someone pulled all the fuses that would drain the battery while the car was in storage, and they just needed to be replaced), I'm envisioning small cosmetic mods for things like a cup holder and some way to keep things plugged into the cigarette lighter.

I'll post back to let everyone know how the oil change goes!
 

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looks really well bought for 6 grand

Not too many Vermont winter on her it looks, but to be safe inspect the two front suspension "A" arms for corrosion. A search here will tell you exactly what to look for,

Good luck,

John
 

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Well done, sir. Drive it before it gets cold!:cheesy:
 

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Beautiful car. 1994 IS THE BEST YEAR. Well, I think so anyways unless you hate ABS and Airbags then 1989. 87 is the worst.

Any Saab turbocharger can outlast the car if properly cared for. Don't spool it up and shut the car down when hot and don't forget to change the oil. I've dismantled half a dozen 900s+, most had their original turbos from what I could tell. (records).

You can run a 900 on cheap 10W30 and it will still do 1million miles, no need to get fancy.

The weak spot on these cars can be the transmission if the PO was especially awful at shifting, and if it is an Automatic, then it is a crap shoot. The Automatics don't benefit from being used lightly, they just fail. Enjoy the car, shift responsibly.

The ABS system can fail, which means suicide. Keep a keen eye out for a spare system.

Later 900s with the later LH 2.4 computers are very reliable, don't worry about talk about bad ECUs, won't be an issue for you.

Keep an eye out for a spare Air Mass Meter. If ones comes along for under $100 take it.

Low miles- watch for a head-gasket failure. Oil in the coolant, white smoke when hot, and excessive water in the oil when warmed up can mean trouble. Not a big deal if it goes, very simple repair, just lots of time (6-8 hours).

Exhaust systems can be replaced with tasty stainless steel upgrades and reproduction Sport Exhaust which will make the car sound awesome.;ol;:cool: I have an OEM Saab Sports Exhaust, it sounds awesome!

The Saab 900 turbo convertible is one of my all time favorite cars, enjoy! 6 years and I still love it.
 

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Headlight switch is easily avalable outside of dealerships. Most common problem is that the plastic locating tabs break where the dash and switch meet causing it to be sloppy and rotate. The switch pulls out toward the driver and is inserted until the tabs latch on the dash. Dash lighting is controlled by the post in the instrument cluster that does not reset the trip meter. Try turning that first, but the bulbs are easily accessible through the speaker on the drivers side.
 

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The easy fix for your headlite switch is to pull it out and put a layer or two of electical tape around it. Twist it back into it's proper location--this will hold it more snugly than the stock locating tabs. I did this for '91 when I got it in 2005. It hasn't moved out of position yet after 7 years and 80,000 miles.

As you work on the car I would carefully inspect/replace any rubber bits (hoses, lines, gromets, bushings) you encounter. Even though the car is low miles some of these parts get soft, chemically break down through age, etc. and in the case of your low milage car are probably original, therefore 18 years old...
 
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