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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1999 9 3 and i just replaced the rear brake pads, I never bled the system and now my brake pedal is very mushy, how do I go about fixing this and how do I bleed the system.
 

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Sometimes new pads do need to bed in; how much cleaning work did you do around where the old pads came out and did you clean or replace the pad guide pins? Only once you have qualified a neat and clean pad install do you start to suspect the bleeding regime. Also, these brakes do not respond well to pedal pump bleeding.

Pressure bleeding from the top or vacuum bleeding [sucking from the nipple - using a suction device] are the best methods.
 

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new93owner said:
I have a 1999 9 3 and i just replaced the rear brake pads, I never bled the system and now my brake pedal is very mushy, how do I go about fixing this and how do I bleed the system.
http://www.geocities.com/ng900set/BrakesR/rear_pads.html?200728 an excellent tutorial on the rear brakes... on bleeding do the fronts first .....do not pump the pedal....too risky..

Simply changing pads does not necessitate the bleeding process; but many pads last for 60K miles, and this is the same as the brake fluid re-newel service interval..
I use the gravity system to renew the fluid., it is slow, requires only a clear vinyl hose, a bottle, and good timing - it is quicker than one would think..:cheesy: ....the reservoir must not be allowed to empty..

Always, new pads require a "bedding" in, even with new rotors...several serious stops should do the trick; old rotors will require maybe 50 stops, as a guess....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I still have the problem, All my callipers are clean. I had tried to use a vacume bleeder to bleed the brakes. I hooked it up to the bleeder valve and it wouldnt pull anything through. The bleeder wouldnt vacume any stronger and nothing happened. whenever I use the brakes i have to push the pedal about 3/4 the way in to come to a normal stop, otherwise it is very gradual and slow. I also made sure that all the fluid passages in the callipers could flow by spraying brake clean through which it went in the one hole and right out the other and I removed the bleeder valve to make sure it wasnt cloged. So im not sure why I cant pull any fluid through the valve. Im stumped.
 

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new93owner said:
I also made sure that all the fluid passages in the callipers could flow by spraying brake clean through which it went in the one hole and right out the other
So a solvent has been pushed through the calliper? This stuff has no real hydraulic performance at all and must be totally purged from the circuit before your brakes will work.
 

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ragtopcav said:
So a solvent has been pushed through the calliper? This stuff has no real hydraulic performance at all and must be totally purged from the circuit before your brakes will work.
+1, you’re going to have to replace all the fluid with new stuff. Remember, any thing in the brake lines other than brake fluid is very bad. Brake fluid has to have a high boiling point, maintain viscosity, absorb any moisture, and lubricate at the same time.


Also, where is Wisconsin do you live? I would be more than glad to help if needed.

-Brandon
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok so I will replace all my fluids in it, but im still wondering why I couldnt pull any fluid through when I was trying to bleed it. I've never really worked on brakes besides my mustangs.

I live about a half hour north of Madison is Sauk City.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Also the callipers are very corroded. Im debating on saving some money and just buying all new callipers and rotors since the car has over 80,000 on it. Any suggestions?
 

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new93owner said:
Also the calipers are very corroded. I'm debating on saving some money and just buying all new calipers and rotors since the car has over 80,000 on it. Any suggestions?
Brake fluid is a powerful solvent and is the only liquid that should ever be in the system..... I have run across clogged bleeders; a few minutes with a probe and some compressed air does the trick.
Some fluid should just "leak" out when the bleeder is removed or just cracked open one turn orso.....I use just a tad of anti-seize on the bleeder threads to deter corrosion..
Rust and scaling(corrosion) on the caliper means little; what really matters is the condition of the piston bore and the seals..
Normally the calipers last the same life as the car....
 

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new93owner said:
Ok so I will replace all my fluids in it, but I'm still wondering why I couldn't pull any fluid through when I was trying to bleed it. I've never really worked on brakes besides my mustangs.

I live about a half hour north of Madison is Sauk City.
The brake master cylinder cap is supposed to be vented - this may need to be cleaned now and again - it is a tiny vent hole...When working on the brakes(retracting the pistons) the reservoir cap should be off - and the level not over-filled; otherwise a mess occurs...
 

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earthworm said:
B
Rust and scaling(corrosion) on the caliper means little;
Ignore the corrosion on the surface of the rear calipers at your pads and rotors peril! They bind up remember? link.

If it is any concellation those calipers are fine now with a bit of tlc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Tweek's Turbos said:
Just to make sure, you know you bleed the calipers at each wheel right? You have to manually open each one before they bleed.
I know that you have to bleed each caliper but what do you mean open them?
 

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ragtopcav said:
Ignore the corrosion on the surface of the rear calipers at your pads and rotors peril! They bind up remember? link.

If it is any concellation those calipers are fine now with a bit of tlc.
Errrrr, sorry,;oops: I meant the cosmetic areas, at all of the contact or machined surfaces ,the metal must be clean and smooth, without rust and properly protected with a little hi-temp grease..:cheesy:
 
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