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Discussion Starter #1
I know I know, I'm embarrassed too

2 things:

I was replacing the fuel filter today, and the first thing I usually do is take out the fuel pump fuse and unscrew the gas cap to depressurize the system

I can't recall, but I've read anecdotally the car should run for 20-30 seconds when taking the fuse out before it dies. Mine died practically instantly, maybe 3 seconds. Is that normal, or an indication of something else failing?

Now, the shameful stuff:

I kinked the line that runs from the filter to the front of the car where it connects to the banjo bolt, and there's a tiny spray of fuel coming when the car is running now with everything hooked back up

:(

Anyone have any experience with that? Is it something I can solve with silicone tape maybe? Do I need to buy a whole new line?

I do have a parts car 2 hours away that I periodically go to for things. Is it easy to take off this line and replace?

$240 from eEuro for the new Genuine line... :(

I know, I'm dumb. What are my options?
 

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Are you sure the leak is from the line and not from the junction? The shop replaced my fuel filter, and the washers that came with the new filter did not seal properly. They put back the original washers and everything was fine.


Assuming the problem is in the fuel line, you don't want to try a temp fix like tape. However, you may be able to create a bridge out of fuel hose. The fuel line pressure isn't that high, so fixes that wouldn't be considered on a brake line might be fine for fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are you sure the leak is from the line and not from the junction? The shop replaced my fuel filter, and the washers that came with the new filter did not seal properly. They put back the original washers and everything was fine.


Assuming the problem is in the fuel line, you don't want to try a temp fix like tape. However, you may be able to create a bridge out of fuel hose. The fuel line pressure isn't that high, so fixes that wouldn't be considered on a brake line might be fine for fuel.
Yea, its definitely from the hose. The washers seal it just fine.

Rescue tape is silicone tape that is apparently fuel resistant and can hold up to 950 PSI of pressure. I was thinking of taking the line off, sealing it up, and putting a couple hose clamps on them for good measure

I also do have a couple feet of '3/16" I.D. (4.8mm) 50 PSI Fuel Hose'. How can I make a bridge out of this? I assume this is too small, I'd probably need to find fuel hose thats slightly bigger than the one on the car and then bridge and connect, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
So I'm thinking I'm going to get the fuel line from the parts car but first I'm going to silicone/clamp the hose down and see how long that lasts without leaking for the sake of science
 

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DO NOT MESS AROUND WITH FUEL, EVER. If the nylon hose got kinked, it needs to be replaced. If it leaks, it need to be replaced now. You do NOT want 60psi of fuel spraying out on the road - that is simply unconscionable.

If the kink is in a straight section, you can definitely do what Ed recommended and splice it together with 5/16" fuel injection use. Use ear clamps (Oetiker clamps) to hold it to the nylon line - I would use two on each side. If you can't do ear clamps, use fuel injection clamps. Do not use worm gear type clamps.

The proper way to fix the problem is with a splice union, or by trimming off the end of the nylon hose and reinserting the banjo fitting. There are kits to do this, you can roll your own, or sometimes if you're lucky you can use force.

However, if you've got a parts car that front section of fuel line takes maybe 10 minutes to remove, so I'd just do that. It runs up the front of the car, up the firewall, and to the fuel rail. Not a challenge whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Okay I shouldn't touch it. I guess I've just been pretty curious as to what this tape can actually do

I'll grab it from the parts car then. I don't need to drive it until then so I just won't start it

The hole is pretty close to the banjo bolt itself so I'm not sure how well splicing it would go
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So I got the new fuel line from the parts car to learn that the fuel line from filter to the rail on the '99 is specific to the year and one from a 2001 is slightly different.

From what I can tell, the only difference is that the one from the 2001 is a bit longer, and the line that's in the engine bay is green. It looks weird installed because it kind of just looks jumbled, but it fits in the connector and there are no kinks or leaks and it runs. However, it got me wondering if this could cause any potential problems? I would assume not, but maybe longer line = more work for the fuel pump? Just curious if anyone has any input
 

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The '99 is a T5 car and the 2001 is a T7 car, so yeah, they're probably different. But a few extra inches won't be an issue so long as the hose is managed and not in a place where it could be damaged.
 

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Better option for making a bridge piece, assuming that you've bust the original line somewhere close by the banjo and you can actually access the section you want to splice.
Take a short length ( 50 mm) of brake pipe. Make sure that when you've cut it, that you deburr both the inner and outer edges on both ends, and blow out all the swarf.
You'll need to force the brake pipe end into each end of the original plastic tube and secure it using hose clips. It will be a tight fit and will need a bit of persuasion to get the brake pipe to push in - it needs at a minimum, at least 20 mm insertion.
Use a Sharpy marker pen to mark the brake pipe at 20 mm from each end so that you will know for sure that you've got the full 20 mm inserted.
As the original plastic tube is fairly rigid, you'll need to heat it slightly to soften it.

Needless to say, naked flame is NOT an option ! Neither is a using a heat gun or hairdryer etc !!

What does work, again assuming that you have sufficient access, is to immerse the plastic tube end into boiling hot water.
That will soften the plastic just enough to allow the brake tube to be pushed into it.
You might have to warm it a couple of times to get the full insertion depth.
Repeat both ends. Don't forget to fit those hose clips !

If you're managed to get the brake pipe inserted far enough on both ends and the ends actually butt up together, then using your tape over the join isn't a bad idea.
I've used this method without any issues at all

Ideally, you should replace the entire pipe, but if you can't get one, then this method works fine.
 

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Eek.... if you are putting brake pipe inside of the nylon fuel line, that ID would be quite small. The factory lines are the size they are for a reason. Introducing a serious restriction like that doesn't seem a great plan from an engine or pump longevity standpoint.
 
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