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Discussion Starter · #181 ·
Got the "adjusted" speedo back and in the car....



The only two projects I have left are the AC and doing something about the dash, but I don't think either of those things prevent me from starting the car... It's had fluids for a week and a half now. I'm thinking this weekend I put the v-belts back on and fire it up. Kinda nervous to!
 

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Discussion Starter · #183 ·
Probably won't have any video... as a lone operator I'll be checking all the things to try and avert disaster. :D

I've been reading various articles on break in, and it seems people generally agree about some concepts but very few specifics. Everyone agrees to avoid idle for the first 20 minutes as much as possible, and then relatively quickly get it under load, but that's about it. Actual engine speed, number of no-load run/cooldown cycles, and then how the load cycles go. Line2Line - the people who did the skirt coating - have some very firm recommendations there, however, so I'm inclined to follow their approach.

I think the approach will be:

1. Disconnect the Hall sensor, and crank the engine over to build oil pressure and bleed the cam followers
2. Start the engine, run it between 1500rpm and 2500 for three 20 minute sessions letting it cool off in between
3. Get it on the road, run it at 1000rpm increments for 20 seconds at a time - ideally in 3rd gear, letting it idle for 1 minute between each increment
4. Change the oil
5. Avoid prolonged idle, high rpm, and keep it in base boost for 200-500 miles
6. Change the oil

Everyone recommends having an oil pressure gauge on-hand, so that's probably something I will work on installing first. Plus, it allows me to drag my feet on starting it some more, which is great. :D I cannot remember the threads on the oil filter housing where a sensor would go! I think it's a metric thread... M14? I feel like when I did this last I needed to use an adapter since all the senders were NPT.
 

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Probably won't have any video... as a lone operator I'll be checking all the things to try and avert disaster. :D

I've been reading various articles on break in, and it seems people generally agree about some concepts but very few specifics. Everyone agrees to avoid idle for the first 20 minutes as much as possible, and then relatively quickly get it under load, but that's about it. Actual engine speed, number of no-load run/cooldown cycles, and then how the load cycles go. Line2Line - the people who did the skirt coating - have some very firm recommendations there, however, so I'm inclined to follow their approach.

I think the approach will be:

1. Disconnect the Hall sensor, and crank the engine over to build oil pressure and bleed the cam followers
2. Start the engine, run it between 1500rpm and 2500 for three 20 minute sessions letting it cool off in between
3. Get it on the road, run it at 1000rpm increments for 20 seconds at a time - ideally in 3rd gear, letting it idle for 1 minute between each increment
4. Change the oil
5. Avoid prolonged idle, high rpm, and keep it in base boost for 200-500 miles
6. Change the oil

Everyone recommends having an oil pressure gauge on-hand, so that's probably something I will work on installing first. Plus, it allows me to drag my feet on starting it some more, which is great. :D I cannot remember the threads on the oil filter housing where a sensor would go! I think it's a metric thread... M14? I feel like when I did this last I needed to use an adapter since all the senders were NPT.
Good luck with the run in , I understand the feet drag, the initial is always nerve racking. Disabling spark until you know you have oil pressure TICK avoiding sustained idling TICK variable engine speed TICK .
I also cant remember the thread , but m14 1.5 rings true , I do remember you need an adaptor that is NPT , I use a T piece that keeps the idiot light and a sensor . Hope the break in goes well ! I am still waiting to break in my rebuilt B205 due to gearbox issues. but it has had initial starts etc.
 

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I think the only thing more decisive then run in is oil selection. I have built engines from small car to engine that go for well over 10K for a rebuild. On all, I started (without pre-oiling) and checked the oil pressure, it all was good, they were put to work.
I wasn't building racing engines that were going to be run near the redline only. Most were heavy truck and equipment engines. They got installed and WORKED!
The most expensive engines, a "core" engine in need of overhaul cost more than $10,000,
never lost an engine on start-up/run in.
I don't assemble dry, and the lube during assembly is enough to carry it until the the oil circulates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #187 ·
I found an Autometer oil pressure gauge in the garage tonight, so if I can find an adapter it should be quick to install... Especially with the dash out, as it is!
 

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Discussion Starter · #188 · (Edited)
Got the gauge installed... it's super classy!



I made a harness to run into the engine bay... I figured since I was putting in a little work I might as well do it right.

It terminates at both ends with GT150 connectors...



There's a three circuit connector in the engine bay, so if someone wanted to add additional gauges it would be pretty trivial.

 

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Discussion Starter · #189 ·
Yesterday I was short on time, but I did finish out with this:


I repeated this a couple more times throughout the day to let oil circulate around a bit more. It was during this process I discovered the starter is probably frelled.... after cranking for a little bit, the drive gear disengages the flywheel and it just spins. The first time it happened my first thought was the engine seized, but no, just a bad starter. Boo.

I had intended to go ahead and replace it, but like I said, time was short... had some other things to do. Primarily this...


AND IT WAS GREAT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #190 ·
Today's mission was primarily to fix this charlie foxtrot...



This is Mr. Previous Owner decided to do the wiring for his H4s. :(

I fixed that:



Now I just gotta try and find from boots (-'86 corner lights) and some covers... not sure if that's gonna be possible, but I'll try. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #191 ·
I should have quit while I was ahead, but adventure is the mother of necessity (did I do that right?), so here we go:


I am slightly concerned about oil pressure, but possibly for no good reason. My '85 SPG shoots up to 60-70psi on a cold start, so to see only 45psi or so is unexpected. It's possible my SPG has a wonky gauge/sender, and it's also possible this is a wonky gauge/sender. Also maybe some side effect of break-in oil?

Since taking that video, the car has been run for about 40 minutes, following the "vary engine speed between 1500-2500rpm for 20 minutes at a time" portion of the break-in. Once it's "real hot" (fans have cycled once or twice) oil pressure is holding at ~45psi at ~2000rpm and at ~25psi at idle (which I am avoiding, per guidelines).

There was a MOUNTAIN of smoke once it got hot the first time, but I'm blaming that on fluids etc. that accumulated on the exhaust over the last year. That had largely subsided. Also, some smoke from the exhaust (probably oil in the cylinders) that seems to have largely dissipated. Oil is still sparkling clean and right where I left it. On each of the first two runs I needed to top off coolant (which is just water right now) ... about 1 cup. That also concerned me. On the 3rd pass it seems to have not dropped, so maybe just air in the system? I've never bungled a head gasket, but there's always a first time. :D

I've got one more 20 minute session to do, then I guess I gotta sack up and find an abandoned road for the coating break in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #193 ·
I'm sure you'll be fine. The most difficult part is setting the cam timing, and it's ultimately not that hard. There's a post back on page 7 where I took a video... there have been TONS of threads about this over the years! :)

Also mind the note I made up above about leaving #4 intake cam follower's black bolt loose... if you don't, air gets trapped in the head and the followers/lifters get oil deprived. After you've set the cam timing and got it mostly back together, leave that bolt loose, put the valve cover on with a couple bolts, disable the ignition, and crank the engine for 30 seconds or so. That will bleed out any air. It also gives you a good opportunity to put a second check on the cam timing.... it's your chance to fix things before actually running the engine. Paranoia is real!
 

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Thanks for the video. Congratulations for reviving the SPG. I really like the sound of 16 valve turbos since I heard one the first time in 1984. Sounds like this one will be a good running car!
 

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Discussion Starter · #195 ·
I hope so!

On the 3rd 20 minute run the smoking has been reduced to very little directly from near the union of the downpipe to the cat, and that's definitely where a lot of chemicals ended up. ;) No more loss of water, either, so that's all good.

I'm still a little worried about the oil pressure situation. I really would have expected 60+ not 50 on a cold engine. There's no rule, just my expectation.

The bottom end has new bearings on the original crank, so there isn't much I could do to tighten that up... I could have the crank ground and go with oversized bearings, but since everything is in spec I'd rather not. Could be wear on the oil pump - I should have but did not check that. And, it could be a worn bypass valve, which actually seems like a real possibility... Spec on the bypass valve is 52-76psi, and 52psi is pretty much exactly the highest oil pressure I've seen. Maybe just a compressed spring. IDK!

Or maybe I'm worried about nothing! I'm going to do an additional run this afternoon and monitor coolant temps with Tech 2... Spec is 39psi at 2000rpm at 176F coolant. I am very confident I'm seeing that, but I've not made specific note.
 

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Oil pressure is highly over-rated. Oil flow is where it's at.
That's why I like thinner oils.
 

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Discussion Starter · #197 ·
To be clear, I 100% agree with you. But, also, I have no idea what I'm talking about. :)

I know modern cars have abandoned high oil pressures and moved to thinner oils to increase efficiency, so what you're saying absolutely rings true, but at the same time I've no idea what this means in practical terms for an older motor design. Generally, I'd be of the opinion that once you have enough oil pressure, anything more is just waste. But how much is enough?

Also, I have no chill, so I did one more 20 minute session this morning. Even with ambient temps at 50F, I'm only seeing 50psi on a stone cold engine. I would have liked to see more, but it does strike me as odd that it's always the same number... I'm actually kind of wondering if maybe it is a worn bypass valve... 52psi is the low end of the spec for it. Something to look at. (I suppose a worn oil pump would also net this behavior.)

After running for 20 minutes at 2000rpm +/- coolant temps are well above 176F (fans have cycled twice) - I know oil temps will lag behind but I've no way to quantify that. Here's what I've got:



48psi at 2000rpm at 190F coolant... that's a healthy margin above spec. I'm still seeing 25psi at 850rpm at 190F coolant. So, basically, it seems that temperature doesn't affect my pressure readings in a measurable way. I'm going to check the bypass valve (that's a fun job... :( ) and then get back to work... which is basically front brakes and then road time. Hopefully Saturday.

During this test, I also observed this:



The tach is low by 100-250 rpm at all times above idle. Means nothing, but I found it interesting. :)

Numbers aside, the motor sounds great. Nothing external seems off in the slightest. I'm glad I did install the pressure gauge so I'd have something to worry about. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #199 ·
I yanked the oil pressure relief valve this evening... mostly for grins. Nothing struck me as odd. I pulled one from a newer motor, and both were the same length, but the car's spring felt a little softer. Not scientifical. So I put the newer spring and plunger back in. Started it up to instant 60psi at 65F ambient. I'm calling it good. Until I test drive it and the worry sets back in, anyway.

In case anyone ever wonders, to remove the oil pressure relief valve, you can:

1. Remove the long LH motor mount bolt (required, or you can't get a socket on the OPRV)
2. Use a 17mm box wrench from underneath to loosen the OPRV (may not be necessary)
3. Use a flex head 17mm socket on a long extension through the steering rack opening

Easy peasy!



I installed the power steering belt, bled the power steering system (ish), final-torque'd the axle nuts. I've gotta:

1. Double-check the spark plugs
2. Install the air filter snorkel
3. Put the new front brakes on
4. Maybe put the front bumper back on

Thinking I might sneak it around Saturday morning...
 

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I yanked the oil pressure relief valve this evening... mostly for grins. Nothing struck me as odd. I pulled one from a newer motor, and both were the same length, but the car's spring felt a little softer. Not scientifical. So I put the newer spring and plunger back in. Started it up to instant 60psi at 65F ambient. I'm calling it good. Until I test drive it and the worry sets back in, anyway.

In case anyone ever wonders, to remove the oil pressure relief valve, you can:

1. Remove the long LH motor mount bolt (required, or you can't get a socket on the OPRV)
2. Use a 17mm box wrench from underneath to loosen the OPRV (may not be necessary)
3. Use a flex head 17mm socket on a long extension through the steering rack opening

Easy peasy!



I installed the power steering belt, bled the power steering system (ish), final-torque'd the axle nuts. I've gotta:

1. Double-check the spark plugs
2. Install the air filter snorkel
3. Put the new front brakes on
4. Maybe put the front bumper back on

Thinking I might sneak it around Saturday morning...
Sounds good , seems like the relief valve spring has eased your concern , for now , I would be calling it good and pressing on :)
 
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