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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all,

I finally got my '95 9000 Aero back! after a year of sitting in the dirt tho :-(. If it wasn't for the tranny fail I'd be at 290k with a lot less rust..



main

A week after getting my baby a used transmission and having her delivered to New York intact with all mods I experienced Brake Fluid warning lamp followed by ABS warning lamp several minutes later.

After topping the brake fluid off several times I inspected the undercarriage .
I noticed a steady leak coming from the passenger side rear. Closer inspection lead me believe it was the rubber brake hose sitting just above the suspension beam..

I purchased a replacement hose, actually 2, from partsgeek. I have the replacement hose now and the car is sitting in the lot now just waiting to be worked on.

Are there any parts of this job that will prove to be frustrating or hard for a DIY person working out in a parking lot?

Any suggestions or comments about this procedure??

That's all for now, using my HP touchpad on the go atm....will update as needed, peace
 

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Have lots of liquid wrench handy. TBH I would not start that job unless you have access to brake flaring tool and some pipe in case it is too rusty and goes wrong, it all hinges on if you can undo the rubber hose from the brake pipe. If you need the car to be working quickly and lack the tools I'd punt this to a mechanic.
 

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I agree pb blaster is my favorite let it sit for several minutes a set of line wrenches would be best. keep your wrenches squared. be sure to let off if you fell the fittings trying to round.once you break it loose the jobs all but over ;) be sure to bleed the breaks when your done
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Video shot

I've had the vehicle jacked up for a couple days and and I'm having a little difficulty finding the actual source of the leak.

I've attached a link to a video of the rear brake when ignition is turned on and brakes are pumped.

The only place I can see that may be the cause is where the long brake line hose goes through the gromet in the suspension, there are a couple of small cracks but its hard to tell if its faulty.

You can obviously see the brake fluid squirting out (skip to 5min into the video) in that general area.

Can anybody help with a diagnosis?

Video:


[edit] Video Part 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8rwz-yfV9I&feature=youtu.be


Thanks guys!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hand Lever Hose (NOT main brake hose)

So after doing a little investigating, I found out this is not the main rear brake hose but the hose going to the emergency hand brake.

Replacing this line in the manor described in my Haynes manual involves lowering the gas tank, possibly removing a seat and I'm sure some other DIY horrors so I am kind of pessimistic about this job now (even after renting some brake flaring tools).

Anybody have past experience doing this job?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Temporary fix

So after doing a little investigating, I found out this is not the main rear brake hose but the hose going to the emergency hand brake.
Is there a way I can plug this brake hose so I am able to drive it without all of my brake fluid leaking out? I know you can clamp the hoses with a special tool when bleeding etc. would this work as a temporary fix?

I do not care so much about the e-brake being operational as I do about getting the car drivable.

I am thinking about taking this car back to VT (300+ miles) so I can get a reasonable quote and reliable repair, so I am looking for a temporary fix that will allow me to get there.

Thanks guys, I appreciate any input/advice you have to offer
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not the Parking (e-brake) Cable

So I'm pretty sure my theory about the parking cable being the culprit was completely false. I think what is going on is that the Caliper is leaking (onto the parking cable) and needs to be replaced.

I have ordered a re-manufactured Caliper (NuGeon) for eeuroparts.com as well as a gasket/seal repair kit for the Caliper. (parts arrived yesterday)


I have removed the Rear passenger caliper and spent some time cleaning it and inspecting it. I used an Allan Key Wrench to pop out the piston but turning the key in the other direction fails to compress it. Initially I thought the old Caliper was fine because there were no holes/cracks in the rubber gasket. Today when I was expecting it I noticed the "washer" or metal ring under the gasket was starting to chip away easily with my fingers.

------------------------------------------------------
I was trying to take a picture with my phone but the touchpad acts up if I have even a trace of moisture or lube on my fingers. I will post a picture later today once my touchpad starts working.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
NOT the Caliper - it's a brake line

Turns out it wasn't the Caliper after all (although it was totally educational getting that stuff together).

It MUST be one of the green brake lines going above the gas tank because that is the general location of the leak and practically everything else has been ruled out.
 

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While renewing calipers recently, I had the fitting at the outer end of the LH rear hose snap off. No big deal right? It's only $20 for a new hose then you just disco the old one and thread on the new one - wrong!

The male adapter and mounting bracket (where steel tubing terminates and changes over to flex hose) were just basically one ball of rust.

They don't look too bad until you get up close, but they are not servicable any more. I say "they" because all 3 9000's in my driveway are in similar condition. There was no way was I going to be able to remove the flex from the steel.

Each brake caliper is serviced by a dedicated steel line that runs from the master to the flex hose - no fittings other than at the ends.

We just used an imp and cropped the steel tubing back to good metal. Bought a 2 foot section of 3/16" brake line with the right fittings (bubble flair - 3/8).

Cut off the shorter of the two flair fittings, then crop and shape the tubing. It's not legal in most states to use compression fittings to splice brake lines (actually a double flair is required) but it is done - a lot.

The fear is that if the compession fitting should lose it's grip, the tubing will pop out, dump all the fluid quickly - resulting in total loss of braking.

On the other hand, if a flair type connection fails (especially a double flair), the brake fluid will still leak out - but slowly enough to maintain some limited braking capability.

Not really an issue with Saabs, due to the dedicated lines for each caliper. But the law is the law.

Spray a good heavy coating of rubber undercoating on the repair and it will not attract attention. Or so I've heard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The compression fittings are definitely a possibility since I don't want to have to drop the gas tank if I don't have to.

While renewing calipers recently, I had the fitting at the outer end of the LH rear hose snap off. No big deal right? It's only $20 for a new hose then you just disco the old one and thread on the new one - wrong!

The male adapter and mounting bracket (where steel tubing terminates and changes over to flex hose) were just basically one ball of rust.

They don't look too bad until you get up close, but they are not servicable any more. I say "they" because all 3 9000's in my driveway are in similar condition. There was no way was I going to be able to remove the flex from the steel.

Each brake caliper is serviced by a dedicated steel line that runs from the master to the flex hose - no fittings other than at the ends.

We just used an imp and cropped the steel tubing back to good metal. Bought a 2 foot section of 3/16" brake line with the right fittings (bubble flair - 3/8).

Cut off the shorter of the two flair fittings, then crop and shape the tubing. It's not legal in most states to use compression fittings to splice brake lines (actually a double flair is required) but it is done - a lot.

The fear is that if the compession fitting should lose it's grip, the tubing will pop out, dump all the fluid quickly - resulting in total loss of braking.

On the other hand, if a flair type connection fails (especially a double flair), the brake fluid will still leak out - but slowly enough to maintain some limited braking capability.

Not really an issue with Saabs, due to the dedicated lines for each caliper. But the law is the law.

Spray a good heavy coating of rubber undercoating on the repair and it will not attract attention. Or so I've heard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A little update

So now that I have the new caliper installed with no leaks, we can tell that it is definitely leaking above the gas tank closest to the passenger side of the car.

Hopefully I can use my flaring tool and some compression fittings to replace the line closest to the passenger side of the car without dropping the gas tank.

Sad news is that I broke the Parking Brake cable while replacing the Caliper so lowering the gas tank is probably going to have to happen anyway.

Good news is my smart phone is working at the moment so I should be able to get some pictures up soon.
 

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Compression fittings often work, but they're not rated for the kinds of pressures encountered in the Brake system. Legally, it would be considered negligent if a professional did it. I assume you have Metric compression fittings?
 
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