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For a little while, our 1990 900S automatic had been seeping a little ATF from one of the lines leading to the cooler (which is built into the lower rad hose--never seen this before on another car :) ). The car has 151k miles.

Specifically, it's the crimp joint where the rubber part of the line meets the metal part that was the source of the leak.

After an exhaustive search of all the "discount" parts places for new lines, the best price I could find was about $120--EACH.

I don't think so :evil:

Before big pickup trucks and SUVs became popular, anyone who regularly towed a boat or trailer here in the US would often fit an auxiliary transmission cooler to their car or station wagon. I figured that there should still be aftermarket hardware and tubing available to do this--and that it should work for the OEM cooler also.

Turns out that Hayden Automotive makes a lot of this stuff. At the local auto parts store, I bought a 4-1/2 foot coil of 11/32-inch rubber transmission cooler line made by this company ($10)--and a 3-pack of fittings (kit number 252, $10), of which one is a perfect fit for the side of the SAAB trans and the other two look pretty sitting on a shelf.

Here's how to make the new lines:

(1) Drain trans--about 4 quarts will come out. Undo the 3 metal fittings--2 at the trans cooler, and one at the trans primary drive casing. Keep the little O-rings! Undo the banjo bolt at the side of the trans (near the kickdown cable), and also remove the adaptor into which the bolt fits. Take the lines to your workbench.

(2) Cut the metal parts of the lines as close as possible to where the rubber crimps on. Deburr these, and flush away any metal filings with carb/choke cleaner. Discard the banjo bolt and its adaptor, and both rubber hose remnants.

(3) Wrap teflon tape around the threads of the useful brass fitting from Hayden kit 252, and tightly screw it into the side of the trans. Screw on the 3 metal fittings (with their remnants of metal tubing), with their O-rings in place.

(4) Cut two lengths of rubber line: 18 inches for the one going from the side of the trans, and about 12 inches for the other. Slip on hose clamps, and push-fit each line onto the metal tubing pieces and the brass fitting. Ensure that the rubber lines are not kinked anywhere, and that the bend in the line going to the brass fitting has a radius of no less than 3 inches. Tighten the hose clamps. Refill trans with fresh Type F fluid.

(5) Gloat over the money you just saved :cheesy:
 

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ProfZ said:
After an exhaustive search of all the "discount" parts places for new lines, the best price I could find was about $120--EACH.

I don't think so

...

(5) Gloat over the money you just saved :cheesy:
I've just gone through the search on the net... I've found 'em for the bargain basement price of $85.00 each. ;P <br>
I think I'm gonna run down to NAPA (It's the only place with any SERVICE left -- sorry to say) and pick'em up some cooler lines. Thanks for the tip.

-FB
 

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This is great info since as you said these lines are pricey. My problem however are the o-rings I believe. The fluid is leaking from out of the top of the connection at the cooler, not at the hose crimp. Any recommendations where to get these o-rings?

On a side note, can you let me know how you managed to get the screw out of the bottom of the radiator fan in order to get to the tranmission end of the hose? I have an '86 so I am hoping they are the same fans.
 

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Thanks for the tip

+1 this was a big money saver, Thank you. I replaced both of my lines on my 2001 9-5, as they were looking pretty worse for wear.

Thought I'd share some additional notes:

- The fittings from this kit that work are the 3/8" NPT - 3/8" Barbed fitting. They are stock in O'reillys for $3 each. I plugged these right into the transmission. They didn't quite fit as well as I would have liked, so I was sure to use a few good wraps of Teflon tape and a sealing washer.

- My tube was cracked, not the hose. So I sawed off the bad bit and connected the 11/32" trans cooler hose straight to the tube with a hose clamp. Make sure to flare the end of the tube if you go this route. I think the pressure is high enough to shoot the hose right off if you don't (even with a hefty hose clamp).

- After I took off the hoses, I realized I didn't know which order they went in. After some laborious searching:

  • Bottom to Bottom; and
  • Top to Top
- Do yourself a favor and use a ratcheting wrench. That bottom banjo fitting is a nightmare.



- I used new copper washers on the banjo bolts at the radiator. Hopefully they are good enough.



Two weeks and no leaks. Thanks again.
 

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i just want to point out one factoid here.

when people are putting the aux coolers onto trucks or large crossovers for towing, they're putting an AUXILIARY in line. they're not cutting out the original cooler, rather they're adding another one for more cooling capacitance.

in your case, i do very strongly believe it to be a bad idea to turn to them in this case to "replace" the original.

further question; where will the damn thing go?!
 

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As long as it can maintain the temp in acceptable range it will be fine. Big trucks with Allison transmission often use a lower hose cooler. Since most trucks use a manual transmission it didn't pay to design one inside the radiator.
Placement of an air cooled type may be hard in the crowded engine bay of a 900. there just isn't a lot of extra space that has good air flow.
 

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well, that as it may work, it's still a lot more cludder and additional wiring required, it's one of those things you see on the internet "**** broke so i rigged another one!"
 
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