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As you know, the compressor doesn't control its cooling capability - it merely runs until either the anti-frost switch or the over-pressure switch cuts out. Or the throttle is wide open. Or the coolant is too hot...

Anyway, I've gotten my AC to run so cold now that I need a way of controlling the temperature, especially when it's raining. I usually just switch the AC off and leave the blower on.

I am thinking of building a temperature control.

Should I wire a separate anti-frost switch in series with the existing one, and connect the adjustment knob to say, the existing temp control knob, which I've disconnected from the heater core valve mechanism?

I guess I should measure the temperature where the new sensor will be and look for a switch around that temp.
 

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As you know, the compressor doesn't control its cooling capability - it merely runs until either the anti-frost switch or the over-pressure switch cuts out. Or the throttle is wide open. Or the coolant is too hot...

Anyway, I've gotten my AC to run so cold now that I need a way of controlling the temperature, especially when it's raining. I usually just switch the AC off and leave the blower on.

I am thinking of building a temperature control.

Should I wire a separate anti-frost switch in series with the existing one, and connect the adjustment knob to say, the existing temp control knob, which I've disconnected from the heater core valve mechanism?

I guess I should measure the temperature where the new sensor will be and look for a switch around that temp.
We've all thought of that. I was thinking of wiring a stat in series with the system pressure switch on the drier. I normally just turn the heat up slightly.
 

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You can buy adjustable frost switches that adjust with a cable but I wouldn't do that. By setting the evaporater temp at just above the frost point you remove the maximum amount of moisture from the air. On cold damp days, removeing the moisture then re-heating the air (via the heater core) you get the maximum defrosting abilitys on the windows.
So just turn your heat knob up a notch and let the system work as it was designed to.
 
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