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I believe the new Rhino ramps can be used with the low riding Saab and others, but have yet to try them
I had some old steel ones that are OK for a Model T Ford or a Saab 96, but however cheap they were ($3 or less), they were simply too steep for a "low rider" ( any 90s car)...
Has anyone tried these newer ramps ??
Possibly one can drop the sub-frame, remove the pan, and examine the screen, just by using the new design ramps and a oak 4 x 4 to support the engine.
I made one for the VW,years ago , very easy to do, no reason to buy a $$$ support...
 

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Not sure what you mean. Picture of ramps and further clarification of your idea for use as an engine support tool would help me understand better. ???
 

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On the topic of rhino ramps.

I picked up a pair yesterday. The problem I had is that the surface I was trying to use them on is freshly sealed, and the ramps kept sliding out. Even with cinder blocks behind the ramps they were still sliding out on me. The problem with these ramps is that getting on them, it is an all or nothing proposition. Basically if you stop/slowdown at any point before you reach the top, the ramps will slide out from under the wheels. I think it took me about 20 times till I finally got to the top. The reason was I did not fully analyze the problem till I was about 15 tries in. Now I think I could probably do it in 2 or 3 shots, its just that I was afraid to give it too much gas, and go off the back of them :)

They are a little tricky, but once you get the hang of them, they are super convenient.
 

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earthworm said:
Possibly one can drop the sub-frame, remove the pan, and examine the screen, just by using the new design ramps and a oak 4 x 4 to support the engine.
Good idea. The shop that dropped my oilpan did NOT support the engine, so it can't take much. I would be reluctant to try that myself if I had not seen it done, and I am not sure if the same trick would work w/o a lift.

They removed the crank pulley plastic access panel (the air dams were already off, psgr wheel still in place but turned out (right). Then some of the bolts on the passenger side of the subframe. The front of the subframe came loose from the front cross-member.

They separated the exhaust between the cat and the flex pipe, and unscrewed the two O2 sensors so they would not be damaged.

All the oilpan bolts were taken out, a couple whacks with a mallet and the oilpan was loose. It only had about an inch of room to move, so it could not be taken out at this point.

One person used a pry bar (carefully) between the front end of the subframe that was loose, and the front cross-member, to push the subframe down, and open a larger gap between the frame and the oilpan.

Then the oilpan could be rotated 90 degrees, pushed over against the loose exhaust, and dropped right out.

If I were doing it that way, I would make a wooden wedge, and drive it between the subframe and the front cross, but I would still support the engine first.
 

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I've been using Rhino ramps for a couple of years. The ones I have are still too high for my lowered 900 with Viggen bumpers, but they worked when the car was lowered with a Talladega lip spoiler, and they work great on my mom's Pontiac Grand Prix, which is also pretty low. They're also good for backing onto if you're working on the rear suspension or the exhaust system.
 
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