SaabCentral Forums banner

97 Saab 9000 Aero - SRS - Location of Turn Signal Relay

5315 Views 19 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  WorkingStiff
Car: 97 9000 Aero, w SRS on passenger side.

The following are fairly comprehensive directions and comments to change a relay in a 97 Saab 9000 Aero.
In this case a Turn Signal Relay - the right blinker was not working.

The relay is located with others on the passenger side, under the SRS, behind the fuse array.

There’s a plastic/upholstered cover (cowling) over the fuse array that must be removed first. It requires some force and should be pulled out as straight as possible or some fuses may fly.
I had been under the impression that it was fastened, it is not, it simply clicks in and out of position.

The following shows in detail, how to remove the fuse array to get to the relays?
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
There are two Torx screws...T25 maybe?...that you have to remove to drop the fuse panel and see the relays.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
From the description in the post linked to I'd say the torx screws are accessed only after you pull the plastic trim away from the fuses, into the car interior. From the description those holes originally had black plastic plugs in them. It looks as though the plastic door and the trim around the fuses pulls away and should reveal a metal rail holding the fuses. It is that metal rail that is screwed in and is in the way of you accessing the relays. Again, I'm just reading the post, I haven't tried to do this.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
I had mine off a number of times. It's really not this difficult. You do need to give it a good tug to release the plastic door and frame
 

· Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
the plastic piece miraculously clicks into place and needs quite some force to come off.

Before you start pulling, make sure the ignition is off. The plastic surround might pull some fuses out as it pops off and if the wrong fuses are pulled with ignition one you risk setting a SRS fault code.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
A little progress. Thanks to scantar and 90000006 to use "quite some force" to remove the plastic door and frame. I did, and it worked! With a few fuses flying off at the same time.
NOW, the torx screws and relays are very visible. T-25.

I had been under the impression that the plastic surround (cowling) was attached by torx, clips, ad nauseam. So thanks for clearing this up for me.

I suspect there are very few 9000 owners left who need this information, but I'm going to add to this undertaking (relay change) with more photos and description that may help others.

Great tip on leaving ignition off. I do anyway when working on the car unless it's required. But the flying fuses when I popped off the plastic I think would have created havoc.
Again, many thanks to all. Alan (WorkingStiff).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
I would even go one step further - especially with the 9k - and that is to remove the negative cable from the battery before doing anything around that fuse/relay panel
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,343 Posts
Novice question. After one removes the negative cable from the battery, where does one place it? Can it contact anything, or must it be "protected"?
Anywhere but the positive terminal ;)

You can tuck it behind the battery somewhere to keep it out of harm's way. Just keep it away from anything red
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
Yes, that negative cable is also referred to as the ground cable. Best place for it is touching the bodywork or engine as that prevents it from connecting with anything positive still connected to the battery. Then both ends of the negative cable are grounded.

As has been pointed out, there can be no circuit until the ground is reconnected to the battery. Removing the negative cable from the battery post prevents any circuit from closing through the battery as long as you don't touch that bare battery post while connected to a positive feed in the car. To do that you'd actually have to be at the battery if the negative cable is disconnected.

Just btw, do exercise caution while disconnecting that ground cable until it is actually off the battery post.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
More progress and a few photos. First photo shows the two Torx screws that have to be removed. You'll find these AFTER you remove the plastic cover (cowling). It takes a good pull to remove the plastic cover, and as pointed out, you should disconnect the negative cable from the battery before doing any work. Note the duct work opening A. This duct work supports the cable bank and swings down to facilitate the swinging down of the relay tray.


Next is a photo of the page from the manual showing the fuse bank and which ones do what.


Next photo is of the relay tray dropped and exposed.

And finally a detail of where the ductwork A "connector" slides back into - with a cllick - after you've put the relay back and screwed in the Torx screws. It is not connected to the relay tray.

Hope this is helpful. I have a new relay for the turn signal and will let you know if it was a good one. Thanks to all for the tips and what to look out for.
This tray had some debris on it as well, leaves, etc. Have no idea how they got there, but wondered if it was natural for an old car, a source of future trouble or....
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
Thanks for this very useful post. The dust and leaves may get in through the recirculating door if maintenance on the cabin air filter is not done carefully. The door and its opening are right above this location behind that ductwork. The leaves could get in when the cabin air filter cavity is not cleaned when the filter is replaced, or removed for inspection. They can then migrate to the wrong side of the filter and into the cabin if the recirc door is closed.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
One more thing: when you put everything back together make sure the wiring loom is secured in such a way that it does not rest on the lower edge of the dashboard. There is a metal strip running along the entire width of the dashboard. It is so sharp that over time it will cut through the wiring loom isolation if the loom rests on it (don't ask how I know).
Causing all kinds of funny electrical havoc, the kind that may even set your car on fire. Main power supply to the fusebox runs in this loom, heavy gauge un-fused wires straight from the positive battery terminal...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks again everyone.
Mr. Superaero, it's been so long I don't know if the cabin air filter has ever been cleaned/replaced/whatever. This raises new questions and probably warrants a new and different thread - or perhaps one exists already?..., I haven't searched yet, but feedback would be helpful. I have another question as well, the long black box against the firewall under the hood/bonnet? - may be called the aquarium?, I sense that needs to be opened and cleaned as well. If both of these issues require a new/different thread, please advise.

90000006, thanks for the heads up re the wiring loom. To prevent its resting on the metal strip, is the remedy obvious or require secret sauce?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,497 Posts
Harness should Not rub IF the oem metal edge protection for wiring measures are still in place. Inept previous work?. Saab factory was good about that.
Slap some duct tape on, if worried ?
Aquarium lid Comes off fairly easily.
Bit fiddly though Don't lose the screws and note how the rubber seal lip fits.
Cabin filter is on top of the air housing apparatus.
It pulls out once the cover is unscrewed. I just Shop Vac Mine for debris.
It's neither special nor hugely effective by moderne standards.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
When replacing the aquarium cover make sure the rubber drain pipe under the central rain drain isn't kinked as it goes back in, or you'll get water inside the car.

The general area under the cover gets cleaned up by rain fairly well. It's designed to accept run off from the windshield and sunroof drains as well as the AC evaporator box. If the drains are clear it should stay fairly clean. I've not cleaned mine out in 15 years of ownership. The cabin air filter box is different and should be inspected for loose debris when the filter is removed.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top