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Saab 9-3 [2.2TiD Vector 2004]
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello again Saab Central Forum... Just so you know, the car is back together, all wheels are secure and I have two new Struts... One happy car...

My new problem relates to a hard start... So again the brief backstory is that the car sat idle for 4 years... I have replaced the battery but the car is still hard to start...


...and... I had an EGR error on my little OBDII gadget... BUT... when looking in to the car and following the vacuum pipes, I noticed that at least two were 'apart'. Using the science of 'guesswork' I slotted the pipes on to the T Junctions that looked like they were the correct length for... took the car for a spin and no more 'lag'... that is a win...

BUT... the car was still a bits to start (you see what I done there?). Having read up on the EGR valve and it's located right at the front of the engine, I took my tools from the cutlery drawer and proceeded to yank if off the engine, and spray a can's worth of EGR cleaner in to and all around the element. I popped, shifted and swung anything that would move and left if alone for a couple of hours.

Put the car back together... no change...

So when I say it's hard to start here is what I mean... I have two batteries... one new, the other older, but with less than 500 miles on it (it was new when parked up). The battery not on the car is on charge.

I try to start the car... a 2.2 TiD. It cranks really slowly... but if I add the second battery... it starts with a lot of persuasion, and a lot of kicking the accelerator. Even then my foot is full down and if I lift too soon it will stall.

After the EGR I swapped out the Glow Plugs... all good and no issues... then I thought maybe it's a bad ground... So I took off the battery, the cover and proceeded to clean up all the earthing points on the car, sanding, wire brushing and polishing all the connections, as well as the battery harness wires.

No difference... but while the tray was off... I found something dangling, and looked for where it clipped in to... It didn't... I worked out that it is the bottom of the Glow Plug Relay, an aluminium finned box that sits on the battery tray (on my particular vehicle). It has actually come apart (as in the plastic face is still clipped in to the female connector, and the pins are all connected to the aluminium unit).

So, this begs the question... Could this be why the car is so hard to start?

Or could it be the Starter Relay (which I believe is the yellow relay).

It would be much simpler if the car didn't start full stop... then I would know it is an electrical issue... but it does start up with two batteries?

Can anyone shed any light on this issue for me please? In a nutshell, if it's the Starter or the Glow Plug Relay... would the car start at all?

And if I can rule out the relays, and eliminate the battery (which I intend to get load checked), eliminate the EGR, it's not the Glow Plugs...

Where am I at (again, bear in mind the car runs fine once it's started... so it's not fuel, air or compression is it?)

OK... back to your Bank Holiday for now... all answers will be given equal credence... so lets have them.


Regards

Garth
 

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Have you double checked battery cables?
 

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Saab 9-3 [2.2TiD Vector 2004]
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21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Mimmi... Yes I had the negative leads off and cleaned up the Positives... cleaned up all the ground points on the chasis.
 

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Saab 9-3 [2.2TiD Vector 2004]
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
G'day people... I know you will all be scrambling over yourselves trying to help me out here but after extensive research on the matter I have found this telling phrase on another forum (and saw a similar sentence on the Champion Spark Website).

"The gp relay would kill the battery quickly."

I think I gotta get me a Glow Plug Relay.... it's the kind of thing I have never heard of... when I saw it on the car I didn't recognise it... but when you have eliminated the obvious...

I will post the results as and when I get them.

Garth
 

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Although you tested each glow plug to see if it heats up, in the car the glow plug relay may not be sending current to them when the key is in the glow plug position. That is the first issue. I would suspect a bad glow plug relay. The second issue is either a weak battery or resistance in the battery cables.
 

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Saab 9-3 [2.2TiD Vector 2004]
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Windsor,
I've had the cables off and sanded, emery clothed them all down thinking the same thing...

The Battery (B) is brand new... and battery (A) is not old, though it is in age it has been dormant for 4 years (when it was bought new)

More and more it is pointing to the bad glow plug relay.

I will update.
 

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One other thing, if the car starts easily when warm, that would point to lack of juice to the glow plugs which are really only needed on a cold engine. A trick I used on really cold diesels is to crank it a few seconds without using the flow plugs to wet the glow plugs, then use the glow plugs- it helps vaporize the fuel and allows a quicker and easier start. I did that on my old diesel Peugeot’s, tractors and boat engines
 
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