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Discussion Starter #41
IIRC there should be no "ring", the part of the TC is smooth like the "new" torque converter

I have no clue why it won't drop in, looks the same. have you asked the seller if that TC was actually installed in the same car as the transmission?
Thank for getting back to me.

Waiting for a response from the seller wolfsburgautoparts

And take it from there. Cant find a TC on ebay
 

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I might remember (but not 100% sure) that it was possible to rotate each gear in the gearbox separatly.

Try to rotate the first gear 1/4 tooth, try again, then again another 1/4 tooth.
If the gears are exactly 1/2 tooth off, it might be impossible to align them just by wiggling.
If it drops a little more, repeat with the second gear.


I would not recommend to use the old TC in the new gearbox. From the video the surface looks very worn.

These surfaces for this type of sealing are usually precisely machined/grinded and very smooth. Otherwise it would immediatlyd destroy the sealing.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Checked with the transmission vendor and the 08 SAAB is the only one they have had, so it has to be the correct TC.

But I still can't get it to drop in into the new transmission. The old worn one fits and both TC fit the old transmission.

Tried moving the splines around, but not much play to move them at all.

And whenever I test the old TC is drops in easily.

Weirdness, and there's gotta be a way.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
(Volvo, GM, Nissan and others all used this transmission)

What matching part numbers do I need to search for a new/rebuilt/used TC?

As the new 06 used transmission only has 50K miles, is an older used TC advisable?

Are they the same #s in Volvo, GM, Nissan and others?

TY
 

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I cant give you the partnumber.
The problem is that there is no Saab part number on the TC. There are different TC versions available. I assume that other manufacturers also might have different TC versions to adopt to their car.

Also it is painful job I would try to investigate why the matching TC will not fit in. If there is a burr on the gears of the gearbox even another TC will not help.

The old TC might fit because its gears are worn out, maybe also the gears on the old gearbox.
I you cant rotate the gears in the gearbox try to rotate the parts inside the TC slightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
OK a while back I finally plucked up the courage to gently force the TC onto the splines. They were tight but tapping with a 4 lb hammer and keeping the TC aligned it slowly slipped in and seated.
Put it all back together only to find that the new main rear engine was leaking badly, but the transmission worked perfectly.

Ordered new seals today and will take the engine out again and make damn sure that rear seal goes in right.
269042
 

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Man, what a thread! Hope you get it all back together - what a nice car to have in Hawaii. Is it the Big Island you live on? When I was a kid, we went to Oahu every year and stayed in the Turtle Bay Hilton, sometimes twice a year in the 90s. Given that I'm from Ireland, this was quite a trek, but I have such fond memories of Hawaii and the good old days. I haven't been since 2002 and to read this thread out of the blue has brought back a nice feeling. Aloha!
 

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For what it's worth (and I don't know if you've done this job already) it's much simpler to take the engine out without the transmission on the automatic cars. You don't have to disassemble the suspension and pull the axles and the transmission stays in the car. (I just did it with my 2001 Aero wagon, see photo below)

The pull is not nearly as steep and you don't need a load leveler. you do have to unbolt the transmission mounts and the part that is on top of the transmission to push it over about an inch so that you can clear the nub in the middle of the TC. I put a 2x4 under the transmission so it sits on the subframe while the mount is off.


the secret is to unbolt the lower alternator bracket (so you do have to take the alternator out) so that you can leave the axle and the intermediate shaft in the car. The one bolt behind the inner driver is a pain since you have to back it out a bit and then pull the bracket away from the engine and then do that again, and again. But other than that it's pretty straightforward, the pull is slightly inclined so that the nub comes out and the flywheel is angled but then it's just a straight up pull.

And you have to push something up through the hole in the bottom of the transmission to hold the TC in place while you're putting the engine back. I sometimes make a metal bracket that I bolt to the bottom of the transmission but this time I just hammered a piece of wood up and then another to keep the pressure on the TC. (you can see it in the picture below) The rope in the back is holding teh alternator in place while doing the pull, the strap in the front is holding the AC compressor. I also don't disconnect the hoses from the PS pump, I just stuff that over where the MAF used to be.

Then once you get the engine out, put the transmission mount back in so that hte transmission is supported.

269043
 

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Discussion Starter #49
For what it's worth (and I don't know if you've done this job already) it's much simpler to take the engine out without the transmission on the automatic cars. You don't have to disassemble the suspension and pull the axles and the transmission stays in the car. (I just did it with my 2001 Aero wagon, see photo below)
Thanks, I missed this tip.

I now have the engine out for the 2nd time because the rear crank seal was leaking badly.

269500


And when I took a good look at the crank seal surface it has v small nicks at several locations around the chamfer and the seal surface.

How they got there I have no idea. Not just one location but the worst is in the pic.

I bought the timken seal TIMKEN 710237 and figured if I set it deep enough and at the right position the seal would be on undamaged crank material.

The I revisited the crankshaft repair sleeves and wondering what to do.

Has anyone used them?

TY
 

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That 's a mess.... Those are definitely tool marks of some kind. It's hard to imagine how that would be done in normal repairs since the flex plate bolts to the crank and when you take the bolts out it kind of falls off. And this surface is behind the flex plate so it's not like something can get to it.

I've not used the repair sleeves although I have seen people report using them on the front crank pulley/harmonic balancer that have worn surfaces. It's a tough call on the rear main seal because if it doesn't work you're taking the engine out again. But the alternative is essentially a new engine since a new crank is going to be just as much and more work.

Good luck with it
 

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Discussion Starter #51 (Edited)
That 's a mess.... Those are definitely tool marks of some kind. It's hard to imagine how that would be done in normal repairs since the flex plate bolts to the crank and when you take the bolts out it kind of falls off. And this surface is behind the flex plate so it's not like something can get to it.

I've not used the repair sleeves although I have seen people report using them on the front crank pulley/harmonic balancer that have worn surfaces. It's a tough call on the rear main seal because if it doesn't work you're taking the engine out again. But the alternative is essentially a new engine since a new crank is going to be just as much and more work.

Good luck with it
Right. How they got there is a mystery because I tore down the engine the first time and never touched those surfaces.

FEL-PRO BS40607 seal was way easier to install compared to the national.

I'm going to grab the sleeve and new FEL-PRO BS40607
 
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