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Discussion Starter #21
Update and Remanufactured AW50-42LE does this fit 2008?

Thanks for the help guys.

I have flushed the transmission 3 times and have only just got tires.

So, haven't driven it much about 25 miles.

A few very short runs between flushes were very promising.

But Sunday after I pushed it fairly hard uphill for a couple of miles, it started slipping a little, then quite severely at a light.

A few hours later it appeared to be OK, downhill, on the way home.

That evening I checked the fluid level and it was spot on full @ 2"

I'll do a few short runs this week and keep my fingers crossed.

On eBay I came across

SAAB, VOLVO, GM, AW50-42LE, AW55-50SN, AF33-5, AW50-51SN, REMAN DYNO VALVE BODY
Condition:Remanufactured
“Rebuilt parts undergo an extensive re-manufacturing and testing process and must meet the same
https://www.ebay.com/itm/SAAB-VOLVO-GM-AW50-42LE-AW55-50SN-AF33-5-AW50-51SN-REMAN-DYNO-VALVE-BODY/182620934101?hash=item2a850e4fd5:g:p0cAAOSwkNZUiybM&frcectupt=true#viTabs_0
 

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Looked again at your post #16. How are you checking fluid? Are you using the plug at the very front of the transmission down low next to the engine block?
 

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I wouldn't go with the valve body at this point, even a reman one unless you really know that there is something wrong in the pressure values at the different taps. Someone who is a good transmission shop should be able to connect pressure gauges on the pressure taps and tell you what's going on. Remember, the transmission is the same as used in a lot of cars, so if they know transmissions they will know this one (Volvo, GM, Nissan and others all used this transmission)
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I wouldn't go with the valve body at this point, even a reman one unless you really know that there is something wrong in the pressure values at the different taps. Someone who is a good transmission shop should be able to connect pressure gauges on the pressure taps and tell you what's going on. Remember, the transmission is the same as used in a lot of cars, so if they know transmissions they will know this one (Volvo, GM, Nissan and others all used this transmission)
Thanks umclemiltie

OK, so the valve body is not the transmission?

It is slipping, but if warm and I start slightly uphill from stop slowly it moves OK but at higher rpm.
Cold it works fine.

So the slippage is a different issue, clutches burnt. Can I rebuild them?
 

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it could be a bunch of things.

First, start with the oil pump (in the transmission). if it's not generating enough pressure, the clutches and bands won't hold since they're all controlled with hydraulic pressure.

Then you get to the solenoids in th valve body, they regulate the pressure

Then you get to the VB it self that routes the pressure to specific spots

Then you get to the clutches and bands


If you look at the side of the transmission behind the left front wheel you'll see what looks like a bunch of really long bolts into the casing. Those are actually pressure taps. They are taps for each of the pressure controlled things so you can take the bolt out and put a gauge on it. The diagnostic procedures for the transmission has you doing certain things (e.g. putting the car in reverse with the brake on and revving to a specific RPM) and then measuring the pressure. A competent transmission shop should be able to do this.

Without doing that you're just guessing. Of course an incompetent transmission shop will just tell you that you need a new transmission since they don't have to worry about diagnosing the right problem since the whole thing gets replaced so the problem is sure to go away, even though it may cost way, way more than it should.


The transmissions can be rebuilt but it'snot a job for an amateur. And at that point you're better off buying a good used one.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Checked around, the only transmission shop around on the island charges $185 to check the status of the transmission.

That's half the cost of a used eBay transmission plus whatever the shipping. Humm.

Should I get it checked?
 

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it could be a bunch of things.

First, start with the oil pump (in the transmission). if it's not generating enough pressure, the clutches and bands won't hold since they're all controlled with hydraulic pressure.

Then you get to the solenoids in th valve body, they regulate the pressure

Then you get to the VB it self that routes the pressure to specific spots

Then you get to the clutches and bands


If you look at the side of the transmission behind the left front wheel you'll see what looks like a bunch of really long bolts into the casing. Those are actually pressure taps. They are taps for each of the pressure controlled things so you can take the bolt out and put a gauge on it. The diagnostic procedures for the transmission has you doing certain things (e.g. putting the car in reverse with the brake on and revving to a specific RPM) and then measuring the pressure. A competent transmission shop should be able to do this.

Without doing that you're just guessing. Of course an incompetent transmission shop will just tell you that you need a new transmission since they don't have to worry about diagnosing the right problem since the whole thing gets replaced so the problem is sure to go away, even though it may cost way, way more than it should.


The transmissions can be rebuilt but it'snot a job for an amateur. And at that point you're better off buying a good used one.
Make this a sticky...
 

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Discussion Starter #31
The transmissions can be rebuilt but it'snot a job for an amateur. And at that point you're better off buying a good used one.
I found this low mileage ebay last night, its from a 2006 with only 56K miles.

Unclemiltie can you help me confirm that its the right one for my 08 Saab 9-5 wagon?

It is from a car with Km not miles on the dash pic and it has a dip stick --- yeah.

Thanks

PS My existing transmission works but slips badly in first gear, if I put it in L it gets going OK. But slips and shifts all over the place if I attempt to drive it hard.
I am interested in this because of the low mileage of the car at 71k and the ebay transmission at 58K.

What other parts will I need? Pump?



https://www.ebay.com/itm/04-10-Saab-9-5-2-3T-Automatic-Transmission-58K-B235R-YS3E-05-06-07-08-09/283220838821?_trkparms=aid=111001&algo=REC.SEED&ao=1&asc=20160908105057&meid=868a8f4d54224e91b511c8e43472dcfc&pid=100675&rk=1&rkt=15&sd=283220838821&itm=283220838821&_trksid=p2481888.c100675.m4236&_trkparms=pageci:e1476247-5186-11e9-8393-74dbd1804a28|parentrq:c58cd8481690aca446784488fff6a78e|iid:1
 

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yes, that transmission will fit in your car, any FA57 will do, the later revision the better since there are some internal upgrades. Try not to get a B02 since that was the first one and that one had issues.

KM. miles, doesn't matter. Getting a dipstick is a good thing. (although it will have a lower revision level since deleting the dipstick was a revision)

$185 is a reasonable price to test the transmission BTW. It's a crap shoot. It could tell you have a bad line pressure solenoid that can be changed with the transmission in the car or it could tell you that the main oil pump isn't working properly so you need to change the transmission.

On your final question, the transmission and main pump are sold (used and new) as a unit so you'll be getting everything you need. Try to find one that doesn't have the wires cut since you'll have to open the valve body to unplug all of the solenoids and it's a pain to do it. But a lot of yards cut the wires. (if they did cut the wires tell them that the harness is a $500 part from Saab, true story) Made they'll give you a deal on the transmission since they did something stupid!
 

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Discussion Starter #33
New Transmission leaking and hairline cracks

PLease take a look.

I got a 9-5 replacement transmission but have questions before I install it ...


1. See video and damage to casing - hairline crack? Or, is is a fabrication issue?
2. And oli leak?
3. Shall I replace the rear engine seal, any other parts needed?
4. Left hand drive shaft outer boot has been sabotaged and leaked grease onto wheel. Looks clean inside the joint and only 72k miles.
Should I have the boot replaced locally or just get a new drive shaft?
5. Can the transmission be replaced by tilting everything sideways.

Any other parts needed? Other than flushing the transmission fluid ....

TY
 

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The "cracks" could be just casting marks. That's the valve body cover and it's not all that hard to change so if you were worried about it you could swap them from your old transmission while the trans is out of the car. But there is no evidence that it's leaking either. It's not THAT hard to swap the valve body cover with the transmission in the car, but if you're not comfortable with it I'd do it while the trans is out.

Replace both of the drive axle seals while the transmission is out, they're cheap.

The torque converter looks like it's not fully seated so make sure that it is before you put the transmission in the car. If you pull it out you'll see that it has two "slots" in it that have to align with the tabs from the main oil pump. The flat spots where the flex plate bolt to the TC should be about 1cm from a straight edge across the case when it's seated properly. Don't worry about it flopping around a little bit, not an issue.

Remanufacdtured drive axles are reasonably cheap, cheaper than a boot will be and you don't have to take the axle apart. Autozone and O'Reilly both sell them. I've had no issues with them in my cars.

The transmission can only be replaced in one of two ways:

Take the entire power plant out the top of the car, engine and transmission. Very steep pull but you can leave almost everything on the engine except the AC compressor and power steering pump.

Or take the subframe off, support the engine with a support beam and then drop the transmission once the subframe is out of the way.

If you think you might need timing chains take it out the top, if you think you might need subframe bushings take it out the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
The torque converter looks like it's not fully seated so make sure that it is before you put the transmission in the car. If you pull it out you'll see that it has two "slots" in it that have to align with the tabs from the main oil pump. The flat spots where the flex plate bolt to the TC should be about 1cm from a straight edge across the case when it's seated properly. Don't worry about it flopping around a little bit, not an issue.
I am having trouble lining up the tabs and slots.
I have tried so many times I am wondering if I should replace the new torque Converter Shaft Seal with another new one, no physical signs of damage.
Suggestions? TY.
 

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you can spin the TC while gently pushing on it to get the slots to engage. If you push too hard you turn the pump but if you do it just right it'll drop in there.

Doesn't hurt to change the seal since if it leaks changing it out is a major job (take the engine/transmission back out)

Also , make sure you put some grease on the seal before you put the TC in. you want some lubrication on the seal for the first few seconds of the car running until the oil splashes around, otherwise you'll burn the seal and you'll be replacing it (see above)
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
you can spin the TC while gently pushing on it to get the slots to engage. If you push too hard you turn the pump but if you do it just right it'll drop in there.

Doesn't hurt to change the seal since if it leaks changing it out is a major job (take the engine/transmission back out)

Also , make sure you put some grease on the seal before you put the TC in. you want some lubrication on the seal for the first few seconds of the car running until the oil splashes around, otherwise you'll burn the seal and you'll be replacing it (see above)
Weirdness.

The torque converter does not fit, yet it fits in the old transmission, and the old TQ fits in the new transmission.
 

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IIRC there should be no "ring", the part of the TC is smooth like the "new" torque converter

I have no clue why it won't drop in, looks the same. have you asked the seller if that TC was actually installed in the same car as the transmission?
 

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also it might not help:
are you 100% sure that the new TC fits to the new gearbox?

I bought a used gearbox and as the shop stored several gearboxes and TC without marking it ended up that they gave me a TC for a 4 speed gearbox.

Look inside the TC and count the teeth for each gear connection.

It took me nearly 1 hour while trying to wiggle the TC in.


But the fact that the it fits in the old transmission, and the old TQ fits in the new transmission makes it unlikely that they mixed it up.


Looking into the gearbox you will find the two markings which will fit into the grooves of the TC. Mark the position on the gearbox and the TC and align them. This makes the first step easier.





Tip for easier handling:
Just put two longer screws into the TC, it makes it much easier to rotate and lift the TC without jamming your fingers.


I agree that there should be no ring, that is the area where the sealing is located. If you tried to push the old TC with the ring into the new gearbox you should check the sealing and might want to replace it. The sealing ring might be quiet expensive. #2 https://www.esaabparts.com/viewparts.php?searchpart=1&section=343917775
 

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Discussion Starter #40
also it might not help:
are you 100% sure that the new TC fits to the new gearbox?

I bought a used gearbox and as the shop stored several gearboxes and TC without marking it ended up that they gave me a TC for a 4 speed gearbox.

Look inside the TC and count the teeth for each gear connection.

It took me nearly 1 hour while trying to wiggle the TC in.

But the fact that the it fits in the old transmission, and the old TQ fits in the new transmission makes it unlikely that they mixed it up.

Looking into the gearbox you will find the two markings which will fit into the grooves of the TC. Mark the position on the gearbox and the TC and align them. This makes the first step easier.

Tip for easier handling:
Just put two longer screws into the TC, it makes it much easier to rotate and lift the TC without jamming your fingers.


I agree that there should be no ring, that is the area where the sealing is located. If you tried to push the old TC with the ring into the new gearbox you should check the sealing and might want to replace it. The sealing ring might be quiet expensive. #2 https://www.esaabparts.com/viewparts.php?searchpart=1&section=343917775
Thanks for the tips.

Mystery right now. I took your advice and wiggled for a while and it would drop in a bit and stop. Must be the splines. Ill keep trying. I have a new seal RockAuto NATIONAL 223830 $4.20 ready for when I understand more and can fit it together.
Trouble is that the old TC was run with the old burnt out transmission and must be suspect, otherwise Id take off the ring, put on a new thinner sleeve.

Waiting on a response from the wreckers wolfsburgautoparts about possible switching TC parts.

PIB trying to fix this in Hawaii.

Hiking Mauna Loa tomorrow to 10,000 feet of thin air be good to get away from it and clear the air.
 
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