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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey all,

Problem: My 2002 9-5 Aero is blowing warm air when the A/C is on LO. I figured it might be a recharge problem so I went out and bought a can of R134a and hooked up the hose to look at the pressure (car on, set at MAX LO when taking reading) The picture below shows it pressure in the blue zone, meaning filled at the proper level. I am hesitant to pump any R134a into the line since it says its at the proper level. Any ideas what might be going on?

Thanks!

*Sorry for the blurry focus of the shot (using an iPhone), but the blue where the needle is, indicated Filled. Green means Low, Yellow is Alert, and Red is Warning.

I checked for ACC fault codes (none, just reads 0) and when I engage the A/C, I can hear the clutch/compressor (or what I think is that) engaging.

 

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Make sure you have the car on and the AC on LO and the fan on the highest setting. I did this and it said i was in the blue filled zone before i started. As i kept letting some in and circulate throughout the system it stayed well in the proper safe zone. Make sure to turn the can upside down when it gets low to get all of the product out. By the way, make sure you are not using the EVAP spot to put the R134a in. The spot to put this stuff in is ctually behind the passenger side headlight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The fan was on MAX and on LO setting. Also the port you see is right next to the EVAP (green cap) port. It is slightly out of the picture and to the left. I am 99% sure that is the recharge port for the A/C, not a port where I have to remove the passenger headlight. Any other thoughts?
 

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I recently had a similar problem. My AC would stop working when the temperature guage would drop from halfway, down to cold. This usually occured when taking a hard right turn, or when boosting in the red. I would sometimes get an engine light, and code 1011. I replaced the thermostat and the problem never came back.
 

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@magi115

The code is P1101 and you should replace your BPV and check the vacuum lines - not the thermostat.
 

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The low pressure connector should be behind the headlight. Do you know if the compressor clutch engages when you turn the AC on? If not then the pressure is to low; even though your gauge is in the blue it's on the low end, low pressure. Try checking the pressure on the valve behind the headlight.
 

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wrong port
That is the correct port. For the 99-01, its behind the headlight, but for the 02/+ models it's right next to the motor mount, which is where he has it connected to.

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=190832

I tried refilling mine today, but for some reason it's not getting sucked into the system. I did feel the can get cold, but the gauge stayed at same position, which is on the low side, and the AC itself did not feel any colder than before. :confused:
 

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That is the correct port. For the 99-01, its behind the headlight, but for the 02/+ models it's right next to the motor mount, which is where he has it connected to.

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=190832

I tried refilling mine today, but for some reason it's not getting sucked into the system. I did feel the can get cold, but the gauge stayed at same position, which is on the low side, and the AC itself did not feel any colder than before. :confused:
Gotcha, mine was behind the headlight.

I did the same thing, it won't work because you have to pull a vacuum to fill an empty system. Gonna take it to a shop and do an evacuation and refill.
 

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Hate to bring this back

I am trying to figure out where the correct port is for a 2002 9-5 Aero. I really dont want to remove the headlight. Is it the port to the right of the EVP one? If so could someone post a picture to confirm this for me.

thanks!
 

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@magi115

The code is P1101 and you should replace your BPV and check the vacuum lines - not the thermostat.
BPV is p 1110 not 1001
P1001 SAAB - Evaporative Emission Canister Purge Valve Low Output 0 | Add Comment Possible causes Faulty EVAP canister purge valve EVAP canister purge valve harness circuit open or shorted EVAP canister purge valve electrical connection P1001 SAAB Description The Engine Control Module (ECM) monitors the Evaporative Emission (EVAP) canister purge valve for open or short circuit.
 

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I have to say I love these a/c posts.

The Saab has a variable pressure compressor. You fill the system by putting the EXACT amount of refrigerant by weight in the system.

You have to drain the old R134a and then put a vacuum pump on the system to get rid of the air and water. Then you refill with 29 to 30 oz. R134a by weight.

You cannot put in R133a until the low pressure is 35 PSI or something.....


I love the TV commercials where you squirt in some R134a and everything is fine!!

Does not work that way. If you are very lucky it works if not, you might put in too much and blow the compressor.
 

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With all due respect for approaching AC problems correctly, there are many who have become Saab owners because Saabs are a lot of (quirky) car for not much money.

It is not all that risky to purchase some refrigerant with stop leak and dye and carefully meter it into a system that used to, but no longer works. Not dumping in a couple of cans at a time, but in stages until one gets some cooling. And if that cooling is wimpy, add some more. No, it is not the correct procedure and if there is a substantial leak it would be stupid to dump refrigerant into the air, but with a $30 gauge and $15-$30 bucks of Freon many simple slow-leak problems can at least be chased down the road a few years.

There are a range of Saab owners on this forum. Some keep all things in order and do so in such a way that their Saabs will last thirty years. Some are trying to get as many miles for the least cost out of this peculiar but satisfying platform. Just $.02
 

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So, I could possibly test this myself with a pressure gage and some R134a?

I thought the consensus around here as that type of freon could be bad for the vehicles A/C system.

If I were to pressure test it, the amount of pressure in the system would then direct me to the next step.

What type of pressure tester will test the system?
 

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R134a is what is used across the model years. It's the only refrigerant you can buy retail. See the sticker on the radiator cross member in the engine compartment.

You can use a manifold and gauge set to get close enough if you can't empty the system and pull a vacuum. It's not the best way since the variable displacement compressor will fool you into thinking you don't have enough R134a until suddenly you have too much. Instead of cycling on and off like a "normal" car AC compressor, the 9-5's compressor instead reduces the amount of volume that it displaces. The variable expansion valve on the evaporator also causes some confusion when looking at low-side pressure.

If all you have is one of those simple low-side only gauges, you can use a warm day (something over about 86F/30C) to approximate a proper charge. Basically, run the engine until warm, fire up the AC on full (no recirc...get outside air through the evaporator for best effect) and start filling the AC from the low side. If the radiator fans aren't running at all when you turn the AC on then you have a very low charge. If you didn't cause that low charge then it might be best to not proceed because you probably have a large leak.

If the fans are running in low speed when you turn on the AC, proceed to fill the system. Continue until the fans kick into high speed mode. That means that you have at least 18bar (about 260psi) on the high side, which should, if your condenser isn't clogged, result in liquid R134a at the out temp of 86F or so. Your low-side gauge should see a variable pressure between 40-50psi. Check the air out of the vents; it should be cool, if not cold. Depending on the outside temp you'll want to add a few more ounces of gas to make sure there's enough to keep the high side pressure above the boiling point on hot days.

This'll get you close enough without overcharging if all you have is one of those Walmart recharge kits "with built-in gauge". While it's best to pull a vacuum and fill by weight it isn't always practical.
 

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Thank you... I want to look into this. I think first I want to see if my fans are running when I turn the A/C on. I do know that the A/C is not very cold when coming out the vents.
 
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