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9-5 Audio - I didn't read every post because electronics isn't my forte but did not see a link to this, which I enclose in case its of interest.


Suspension height - its from the 6 o'clock position on the rim, not the ground.

The oil return from the turbo to the sump. Is your pic the original? Its corrugated metal bendy pipe on mine (2004).

Car looks great. I'll follow with interest - Doug
 

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Discussion Starter #62
9-5 Audio - I didn't read every post because electronics isn't my forte but did not see a link to this, which I enclose in case its of interest.


Suspension height - its from the 6 o'clock position on the rim, not the ground.

The oil return from the turbo to the sump. Is your pic the original? Its corrugated metal bendy pipe on mine (2004).

Car looks great. I'll follow with interest - Doug
HI Doug, thanks for your interest and feedback! That Angry Kitchen Appliances site is where I found that good info on my factory system. I'll have to poke around in there a little more later and see what else I can learn.
I'm not too concerned with the ride height but someone else thought her *** looked low in the first pic (probably because I'm facing down a steep driveway that is humped in the middle).
The car drives great as is, but it will also be getting a full wheel balancing and alignment after I swap out the rims. I'll check it again after all that happens.
The turbo's oil return pipe on these cars is a another learn as they went item, it seems, like the PCV system, fog lamps, corner lights, etc. My car's part is actually the 'original' original. Then that was superseded by what I can only guess is a superior rubber? THEN, they upgraded to the metal pipe on all 9-5's (I imagine this all might have had something to do with the Aero coming a little after my car... And then perhaps later they made a stronger tube for older 9-5's... But this is just speculation).
Anyways, I looked everywhere (online AND in town) for something 3/4" ID with a molded 45 degree elbow AND rated for continuous hot oil (a specific type of synthetic rubber, I learned) and found nothing. That damn molded elbow makes it quite unique. So I broke down and bought the revised rubber factory tube for $59 with free shipping from Saab Parts Depot, part number 9188657. Best deal/solution I could find. Not messing around with my turbo's oil flow. Needs to be right.
I considered converting to the steel pipe if I dropped the oil pan, but since I'm not doing that now, it isn't worth the hassle. I don't plan on driving on gravel roads much anyways. 馃檪
Stay tuned!
 

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The turbo's oil return pipe on these cars is a another learn as they went item, it seems, like the PCV system, fog lamps, corner lights, etc. My car's part is actually the 'original' original. Then that was superseded by what I can only guess is a superior rubber? THEN, they upgraded to the metal pipe on all 9-5's (I imagine this all might have had something to do with the Aero coming a little after my car... And then perhaps later they made a stronger tube for older 9-5's... But this is just speculation).
Anyways, I looked everywhere (online AND in town) for something 3/4" ID with a molded 45 degree elbow AND rated for continuous hot oil (a specific type of synthetic rubber, I learned) and found nothing. That damn molded elbow makes it quite unique. So I broke down and bought the revised rubber factory tube for $59 with free shipping from Saab Parts Depot, part number 9188657. Best deal/solution I could find. Not messing around with my turbo's oil flow. Needs to be right.
I considered converting to the steel pipe if I dropped the oil pan, but since I'm not doing that now, it isn't worth the hassle. I don't plan on driving on gravel roads much anyways. 馃檪
Stay tuned!
The oil return pipe for the Garrett was that 3-piece one with a metal flange, rubber hose and a fiber tip into the block. The oil return pipe for the Mitsubishi was the corrugated metal one. I've had both. Often times when people upgraded their turbos they used the original and thus you will find some cars with the rubber/fiber return.

Oh and it doesn't fit into the pan, it fits into the block so if you want to change it you can do it without changing the pan. It's a pain to get it in there when the turbo isn't loose, but it can be done. Much easier to do when the turbo is out of the car to bolt it up and put that part in first!
 

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Discussion Starter #64
The oil return pipe for the Garrett was that 3-piece one with a metal flange, rubber hose and a fiber tip into the block. The oil return pipe for the Mitsubishi was the corrugated metal one. I've had both. Often times when people upgraded their turbos they used the original and thus you will find some cars with the rubber/fiber return.

Oh and it doesn't fit into the pan, it fits into the block so if you want to change it you can do it without changing the pan. It's a pain to get it in there when the turbo isn't loose, but it can be done. Much easier to do when the turbo is out of the car to bolt it up and put that part in first!
Ah yes, different turbo chargers would certainly be a good explanation for the different types of oil return tubes. And you are correct, this dumps into the block just above the pan... I was mistaken about that before. But I've got no real reason to change this set up. The new rubber hose is now installed. =)

NEW TURBO OIL RETURN INSTALLED.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Another update:

As I just mentioned, the new genuine Saab turbo oil return is now installed.

I also finished the wiper cowl and got it and the wipers reinstalled. I found some flap seal made by Trim Lok that looked to be perfect for finishing the edge of the cowl against the glass, but it only came in a huge roll. Luckily, I found a guy on Ebay that is reselling it by the foot. It has a nice factory look.

I got the area where the battery tray goes all cleaned up and repainted with some high temp engine enamel. The battery tray needs to be sand-blasted and repainted before I can reinstall and connect the battery. I will do this tomorrow probably.

I also got all the wiring done. The new fuse panel cable is installed as well as the new POS battery terminal. I decided to install a rocker switch for the voltmeter in new POS terminal. This little oval hole at the front of the engine bay is the perfect size... the switch snapped right in. I set the battery in place just to test it out. I plan to cut a 1" diameter 'peep' hole into the plastic battery cover so the voltmeter can be seen through it.

The valve cover is now reinstalled with new genuine gaskets. Hopefully it is sealed up well.

I also got the grille done, finally. And in preparation for it's install, I relocated the horns (see next post). REFURBISHED COWL 1.jpg REFURBISHED COWL 2.jpg NEW TRIM-LOK FOR COWL.jpg WIPERS AND COWL REINSTALLED.jpg MASKED OFF FOR PAINT.jpg BYE BYE RUST.jpg NEW FUSE BOX CABLE.jpg VOLTMETER TERMINAL WITH SWITCH.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #66 (Edited)
More details about the grille and horn relocation...

As I got the mesh installed into the grille and mocked it up on the car, I realized I did not want those colorful and unsightly horns right behind the mesh. Luckily, relocating them couldn't have been any easier!

The brackets that hold the horns can be flipped around so that the horns are down inside the bumper cover. There is even an unused tapped hole for the bolt! It is as if Saab wasn't sure yet how they would do the horns when they designed these hole patterns.

I had to bend the brackets a bit to get the horns where I wanted them (right between the slatted areas of the lower valance). The wiring still reached the new locations without straining or rerouting, too. They are in there nice and rigid with about a 1/2" minimum of clearance all around (they might look too close to things in the pictures, but they've got plenty of bounce-around room). I'm very pleased with how this turned out in less than 1 hour of work.

HORN RELOCATE 2.jpg

The grille was just a ton of work overall, but a fun project! Here is a quick rundown of what I did since the last update on the grille.
1) Once the bleach had dissolved off 99% of the plating, I used aluminum-oxide sand paper to remove the last few spots and prep the surface for paint.
2) I used a dremel and some hand-sanding to clean up the areas where I had cut out the middle 'bar' from the front piece (was chrome, now white). I decided not to patch the resulting small areas of missing plastic (shouldn't be too apparent when finished).
3) I used a dremel to carefully cut out the areas with the slats on the back piece (black). It got dangerously thin in areas, but stayed one solid piece.
4) I reassembled front and back pieces and used gorilla glue to tack them together well.
5) I used a piece of paper to template the areas needing mesh, and then cut the first mesh piece.
6) I used gorilla glue and small clamps to tack the mesh in place.
7) It turned out good, so I repeated that process for the other two sections.
8) Once the mesh was secure, I used more gorilla glue and some marine silicone to reinforce and solidify the assembly.
9) I used some thin steel brackets I had on hand to reinforce the mounting tabs at the bottom of the grille.
10) With everything now dry and very solid, I masked off the top area of the black plastic back piece and painted the back side of the assembly with two coats of Rustoleum Trim and Bumper paint.
11) Once that dried, I finish-sanded the front with some 400-grit and painted it with 4 coats of the same paint as above.
12) To match the factory 'bead-blasted' finish of the black ABS plastic I had masked off, I used a misting technique on the final two coats, which works very well with this particular paint and spray nozzle. Basically, you just mist a cloud of paint around the object from about 18 inches away and it ends up with this speckled appearance. It is difficult to get a nice and even texture, but practice makes perfect. Follow up with a blow dryer or heat gun (carefully!) to quicken the drying process and 'freeze' the texture in place.

It actually turned out even closer to factory than I expected. The images below were not doctored (except for captions, obviously). =)

The logo is secured with some black RTV silicone and is currently curing, so you will have to share my suspense in waiting to see the final installation!

GRILLE CUTOUTS.jpg REINFORCE THESE TABS.jpg REINFORCE THIN SECTIONS.jpg ONE SOLID UNIT.jpg PAINT THE BACK FIRST.jpg FINISHED CUSTOM GRILLE.jpg I'M PLEASED WITH THIS FINISH.jpg FACTORY PLASTIC VS MY PAINT JOB.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #67
The new grille is now installed and I am strongly considering smoking/tinting all the front lights so they don't pop so much against the black grille and dark green body paint.
I did a quick and dirty picture edit to get an idea of how that would look... I might give it a try. They make a peelable tint/paint that is easy to remove if you change your mind. A little pricey though.
The clear portions of the rear lights are 'smoked' from the factory, which is cool. Another reason to smoke the fronts.

PLEASE LET ME KNOW WHAT YOU THINK. SHOULD I SMOKE THE FRONT LIGHTS? Thanks for your input!

By the way, you can also get a glimpse of the newly repainted and reinstalled valve cover in some of these pics.
CLEAN AND READY FOR GRILLE.jpg WITH HOOD UP 1.jpg WITH HOOD UP 2.jpg WITH HOOD DOWN 1.jpg WITH HOOD DOWN 2.jpg WITH HOOD DOWN 3.jpg WITH HOOD DOWN 5.jpg FAKE TINT AND PLATE.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Big milestone reached tonight. Got the battery tray done, battery reinstalled, new oil and filter put in, and engine started for first time in well over a month.
She just purred like a sweet little kitten. At this point I couldn't be more pleased with my purchase. =)
I let her idle up to operating temp (about 10 min) then rev'd the engine a bit, simulating moderately-intense driving/shifting. She got nice and hot, but no seeps or leaks from the valve cover or anywhere else (thank God!).
The engine bay looks pretty nice already. I still need to deal with the leaky mess at and below the power steering fluid reservoir. Other than that, I just need to reinstall the under-chassis covers, get her back on the ground, and finish the stereo install. Then she will be ready for a nice and lengthy test drive! =)

I haven't started on the wheels yet, but soon...

THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT.jpg MY PRETTY LITTLE CLEO.jpg HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #69 (Edited)
The stereo install is finished and I'm very pleased with the results!
As I stated when I did the mock install, I am not in love with the resulting color mismatch around the head unit, but given my budget and the limited options on the market, I'm pretty happy with how it looks.

This head unit is very impressive, by the way. It has crossover, input balancing, and channel specific volume controls, very nice EQ interface, android auto of course... for the price tag I am VERY impressed.

The sound quality is better than I expected, after some fine-tuning on the new head unit. It definitely will get louder than I will ever want it to be, and the bass is rich and clean, even at high volumes. It certainly 'thumps' more than I expected. The mid's and high's also sound great... I don't think I need to spend another dime on this sound system anytime soon! =)


I've still got a few more projects planned in the near future (in no particular order, really).

1) Saab 9-3 wheels, sand-blast and paint (starting on this tomorrow)
2) Dean Wintercat studded tires, mount and balance on stock rims (I'll do this next week)
3) Check alignment front and rear and adjust if needed (also next week)
4) Mount and balance summer tires on painted 9-3 rims (a couple weeks out probably)
5) Tint the windows (I might do this myself. Good film is super cheap. Gonna practice on my Honda!)
6) Multiple power steering issues (seepage at reservoir, seepage from high pressure fitting(s), looks like wrong fluid in system, previous service record recommended replacing rack and pinion?? need to inspect further).
7) Coolant system flush and inspect all coolant hoses
8) Inspect all vacuum hoses and replace any that are stiff or cracking
9) Replace manual transmission fluid, since it likely has never been done (Not sure if this is the same for my 1999, but I'm sure it is similar... Manual gearbox fluid change - Saab 9-5)
10) Lube chassis (I seem to have lost my grease gun sometime in the last 10 years)
11) Set up a box of critical spares to keep in the trunk (so far I am just planning on spare head lights, spare DIC, and spare fuel pump. Anything else you would advise to keep on-hand?).
12) Reverse lock delete. No rush on this, but definitely going to do it.
13) Use tech 2 to reprogram headlight/DRL function (I pulled the fuse, but it still isn't how I want it)
14) I decided to go ahead and try the peel-coat on the front lights. Maybe next weekend.

I decided not to bother with a backup camera. It's just not worth the hassle. Maybe someday if I get REALLY bored.

MAGNETIC REMOTE HOLDER!.jpg I LOVE TECHNOLOGY.jpg THE BEST ON SCREEN NAV.jpg Capture.PNG
 

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Discussion Starter #70
I tinted the front lights with that Peel Coat stuff and I am really happy with the results! It balanced out the darkness of the front-end nicely. We'll see how it holds up. Nice thing is it's like a tough rubber coating that I can peel right off and reapply if/when it gets all scuffed or chipped up.
Obviously you wouldn't want to use this if you still run your headlight wipers.
Still waiting on the new plates but other than that, the front end is finally DONE! =)
I'm excited to get those new wheels painted and on there. And then the window tint. She's gonna look great!
FINISHED FRONT END (EXCEPT PLATE).jpg AT DAWN 3.jpg SMOKED FRONT LIGHTS 2.jpg
 
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