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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I am planning to do the sump drop on my car tonight, it's a 1999 9-5 with the 2.3t engine. I already have the car up on stands and ready to go as soon as I get home from work, I probably won't get it all back together tonight but hopefully by the weekend. And, I know someone will respond with this, so Yes, I have ordered and received the oil sump O-rings that are required and the proper sealant.

I want to look at a couple rod bearings while I have the pan down and plastigage them. I have a Haynes manual ordered but it won't be here until late next week, I plan on ordering a WIS at some point as well.

I have a couple pressing questions.

1. What is the proper rod bolt torque value?

2. What is the proper oil clearance, i.e. what should the plastigage read after I torque the bolts down then remove again and measure?

I have rebuilt several engines over the years so I don't need a tutorial about how it works, just the proper specs.

I read somewhere that people are just going ahead and replacing the rod bearings anyway, for good measure, without using plastigage. I'm not sure I'm comfortable with that, but maybe it's OK.

Yes, I did several searches, and came up with long threads on the 'how to' but nothing mentioned torque specs or clearances that I could find. Again, if my repair manual was here I wouldn't need to start this thread, but I don't want to wait that long to do the work.

Thanks, this forum is great.
 

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Never seen a bad rod bearing EVER on the 2.3, even a sludged up one. Not worth your time IMHO.

If you see no sludge ( especially if its never been dropped before) likely your bearings will go on forever and its not worth checking, but for S&G you can pull the #4 main cap and check it out, it is the farthest away from the oil pump and suffers first if there is an issue.

Here are all the torque specs I have collected over the years: BUt I noticed I did not have the Rod or mains filled in hmmmm

Torque specifications:
Piston oil squirters: 14 lb/ft.
Main bearing caps, using ARP stud, washer and nut kit. Use ARP “Ultra Torque lube.”
Main 1:__________lb/ft. Main 2:__________lb/ft. Main 3:_________lb/ft. Main 4:_________lb/ft. Main 5:_________lb/ft.
ARP 2000 connecting rod bolts:
Rod 1:________lb/ft. Rod 2:________lb/ft. Rod 3:________lb/ft. Rod 4:________lb/ft.
Timing components; Guide rail, chain guide/keeper, balance shaft cavity plugs, balance shafts chain tensioner plug, etc: 8 lb/ft. And red Loctite.
Timing cover torx bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Oil pressure reducing valve plug: 22 lb/ft. Orange sealer.
Crankshaft pulley / harmonic balancer bolt: 129.5 lb/ft.
Rear engine cover torx bolts: 8 lb/ft.
Engine oil and coolant gallery block plugs: 22 lb/ft. With copper washers and orange sealer.
Engine oil pressure switch: 18 lb/ft.
Engine oil pickup tube bolts: 8 lb/ft. With red Loctite. RedLine assembly lube on o-ring.
Oil direction tray bolts: 8 lb/ft. With red Loctite.
Oil pan bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Oil drain plug bolt with copper washer: 18.5 lb/ft.
ARP Cylinder head studs. Using their “Ultra torque lube.”
Do in this sequence: 15lb/ft. 30lb/ft. 60lb/ft. Final torque: 90lb/ft.

Camshaft cap bolts: 11 lb/ft.
Camshaft sprocket bolts: 47 lb/ft.
Timing chain tensioner: 47 lb/ft.
Timing chain tensioner plug bolt: 16 lb/ft.
Thermostat housing bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Camshaft / Valve cover torx bolts: 12 lb/ft.
Spark plugs: 20.7 lb/ft. With anti-seize on threads.
Intake manifold bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Throttle body bolts: 6 lb/ft. With blue Loctite.
Injector rail / fuel rail bolts: 8 lb/ft.
MAP sensor torx bolts: 6 lb/ft.
Vacuum tree / supply: 6 lb/ft. With blue Loctite.
Exhaust manifold nuts: 19 lb/ft.
Turbocharger nuts: 24 lb/ft.
Oil filter housing bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Oil cooler hoses nuts: 13.3 lb/ft.
Oil thermostat plug: 44 lb/ft.
Power steering bracket and pump bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Alternator bracket bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Alternator hex bolts: 20 lb/ft.
A/C compressor hex bolts: 22 lb/ft. Blue Loctite.
Engine mount bracket bolts: 24 lb/ft. blue Loctite.
Water pump bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Flywheel bolts: 59.2 lb/ft.
Clutch pressure plate bolts: 16 lb/ft. With blue Loctite.
Transmission to engine bolts: 50 lb/ft.
Rear engine mount bracket bolts: 50 lb/ft. Blue Loctite.
Rear engine mount to sub frame nuts: 37 lb/ft.
Transmission mount bracket bolts: 30 lb/ft. Blue Loctite.
Transmission mount to sub frame bolts: 46 lb/ft. Red Loctite.
Intermediate shaft carrier bolts: 16 lb/ft.
Right side engine mount to bracket hex bolt: 30 lb/ft. Blue Loctite. To sub frame: 54 lb/ft. Red Loctite.
Sub frame bolt torques: In sequence, front, rear and middle last.
Front: 85 lb/ft. Rear: 81 lb/ft. + 75 degrees. Middle: 141 lb/ft. Red Loctite all sub frame bolts.
Ball joints: 55.4 lb/ft.
Steering arm to sub frame bolts: 84.9 lb/ft.
Stanchion arm to steering arm torx bolts: 67.9 lb/ft.
Axle nuts: 214 lb/ft.
Wheels: 92 lb/ft.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, that is a lot of info, but still not what I need.

I never found 1 thread that showed anybody using plastigage on the bearings, several talked about it, but none showed any results. Maybe no one else could find the specs either.

Several just mentioned slipping in new bearing shells if the old ones looked nasty or show any kind of wear.

I may just have to go that way, take a couple off and look, if they are scored or worn just replace them, at $50 for the set it's not a huge expense. An old timer once told me, rod bearings were worth 10 psi of oil pressure in a small block Chevy, wonder if that holds true with Saab's.

Or maybe like you say, drop sump, clean sump, put it back together, drive, smile.

Maybe it's not worth messing with, my oil light isn't on or anything, and the engine sounds good, just new to Saab's and want to do it for preventative maintenance.

Thanks.
 

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Drop the sump for piece of mind. I used Plastigage on my rod bearings and got the results that I expected. #1 was worn down to the copper, the rest were showing their age. Simple job to replace them. Go for it. If you can's find the torque specs PM me with what you need. I'm at work right now, off in 20, then i'll be home for a couple of hours.
 

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Drop the sump for piece of mind. I used Plastigage on my rod bearings and got the results that I expected. #1 was worn down to the copper, the rest were showing their age. Simple job to replace them. Go for it. If you can's find the torque specs PM me with what you need. I'm at work right now, off in 20, then i'll be home for a couple of hours.
If you find the specs can you post them up, I'd lke to update my list to make it complete
 

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Main bearing 15 lb/ft +70 degrees, rod bearings (big end bearing) with bolt 18 lb/ft + 100 degrees, with nut 15 lb/ft + 70 degrees, flywheel 15 lb/ft +50, 7 lb/ft for chain tensioner, timing cover 16 lb/ft, 130 lb/ft for the crankshaft pulley. Head bolts in three stages: 30 lb/ft, 44 lb/ft and a final 90 degree turn/ Bolts have to be tightened in a certain sequence and are not re-usable. If you pull the head spring for new head bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, I dropped my oil pan last Friday night, found a fair amount if sludge, the pick up screen was approximately 50% plugged with a pile of crap living directly under the screen, so I would assume as soon as the engine was started it would immediately pick up the grit and grime that was there so it was probably 70-80% plugged at that point.

I pulled #4 rod bearing and it was down to the copper, the crankshaft surface while not perfect didn't have any scores or scratches to be concerned about.
I ordered a new set of rod bearings, my Local NAPA could get them in overnight and the price was exactly the same as online, once you added in the shipping costs, plus I didn't have to wait 5-7 days on shipping, priceless. Plus if they show up and are the wrong thing, I can walk in and hand it back to them, again, priceless.

I am not going to pull a main bearing for fear of what I might find, the engine ran good before, with no knocking, I will do the rod bearings, that should bump up oil pressure a little. I am going to use Valvoline pure synthetic 5w-40 European car formula, my local NAPA keeps it on hand, and had an excellent price on it as well, better than what I found online.

No one has replied with the oil clearance spec, I am going to plasitgage each rod bearing, and I guess just write the results down for future reference. It's about all I can do. I doubt they will be too tight, anyway.
 

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OK, I am planning to do the sump drop on my car tonight, it's a 1999 9-5 with the 2.3t engine. I already have the car up on stands and ready to go as soon as I get home from work, I probably won't get it all back together tonight but hopefully by the weekend. And, I know someone will respond with this, so Yes, I have ordered and received the oil sump O-rings that are required and the proper sealant.

I want to look at a couple rod bearings while I have the pan down and plastigage them. I have a Haynes manual ordered but it won't be here until late next week, I plan on ordering a WIS at some point as well.

I have a couple pressing questions.

1. What is the proper rod bolt torque value?

2. What is the proper oil clearance, i.e. what should the plastigage read after I torque the bolts down then remove again and measure?

I have rebuilt several engines over the years so I don't need a tutorial about how it works, just the proper specs.

I read somewhere that people are just going ahead and replacing the rod bearings anyway, for good measure, without using plastigage. I'm not sure I'm comfortable with that, but maybe it's OK.

Yes, I did several searches, and came up with long threads on the 'how to' but nothing mentioned torque specs or clearances that I could find. Again, if my repair manual was here I wouldn't need to start this thread, but I don't want to wait that long to do the work.

Thanks, this forum is great.
272395
 
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