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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two weeks ago, I bought a 1995 Saab 900 SE Scania, from my Aunt She needed the cash. She is getting very elderly. An was selling off the extra to go to the nursing home to be with my Uncle. Well The car is a one owner. She bought it new. Always parked in the garage. The total miles on it is 23,455. The car is in show room condition. So I paid a good price for it. I know the history of the car, oil changes and everything else. Well my wife took it to work last week. A trip of 10 miles round trip. The thing jumped time and now is dead. I had a guy look it over to get a second opinion on what went wrong. Sure enough the heads shot valves bent and top of piston damaged. So I looked around to fins a replacement engine for it. Which it appears to me to be a very rare item that is still in working condition. So I looked at the idea of engine swaps. But what I found was talking about Saab 9000 ...
Here is what I found part of it....

I bought the SAAB 9000, V6 with rod knock. I knew there was something seriously wrong with this engine, but hopping that it would just be a small fix. But it turned out that there is nothing I can do but tear down the bottom end of engine. I’ld be much more careful in the future. Then
come to find out that SAAB 9000 V6 are so rare, and wrecking yard want an arm and a leg for a used engine. Definitely less expensive than new engine, which would set me back $3200 plus tax, but still a lot more than that I wanted to spend. These engines also have a design flaw with
timing belt, and tensioner. In the U.S., the same engine is used on the Cadillac Catera and Saturn L-series. Catera had recall regarding timing belt/tensioner issue on ’97 and ’98. L-series doesn’t have V6 until 2000. Finally I was able to locate the L-series engine about 40 miles away
from my home with the price that I was willing to pay for. If it weren’t for the Saturn engine, it would make no financial sense at all to have the SAAB engine replaced in this car. Thus, Lseries V6 in my SAAB 9000 story begins.

So would this info or same engine work for my busted
1995 Saab 900 SE Scania
VIN: YS3DF58V3S20xxxxx
Model: Saab 900
Model Year: 1995
Body type: 5-door (5D)
Engine: B258I V6, Fuel injection, PETROL, I (B258 I)
Gearbox: 4-speed automatic
Plant: Trollhattan, Sweden, line B (900 / 9-3)
Market: Model series III, Driver and passenger airbags
Engine: B258I V6
2.5L V6 DOHC 24V


Thanks for any help, tip, or response...
 

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I'm not sure I follow. You bought a SAAB 900 SE V6, with a B258I V6 engine, the top end was damaged when the valves interfered with the piston, and then you bought a SAAB 9000 with the V6 and bottom end damage... It seems like you should take the cylinder head off the 9000 and put it on the 900 to get a complete working engine, but I'm not sure what you're asking. I'm surprised they are so rare there, there are probably five or six SAAB B258I V6 engines in the four self-service salvage yards around Denver, $199/ea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Two weeks ago, I bought a 1995 Saab 900 SE Scania, from my Aunt She needed the cash. She is getting very elderly. An was selling off the extra to go to the nursing home to be with my Uncle. Well The car is a one owner. She bought it new. Always parked in the garage. The total miles on it is 23,455. The car is in show room condition. So I paid a good price for it. I know the history of the car, oil changes and everything else. Well my wife took it to work last week. A trip of 10 miles round trip. The thing jumped time and now is dead. I had a guy look it over to get a second opinion on what went wrong. Sure enough the heads shot valves bent and top of piston damaged. So I looked around to find a replacement engine for it. Which it appears to me to be a very rare item that is still in working condition. So I looked at the idea of engine swaps.
This is what I have. The 2nd part was out of a engine swap PDF file I found on the internet. What I have is a car with bad heads, and pistons. As far as I know right now. Now if I swap the engine out with another Saab v6 engine, I might have the same problem in no time. If it jumps timing. Or is their a chain drive that you can put on these engines to keep them right. I hope this clear it up some. I just been looking around and it seam that these v6 engines have a problem and jump timing if the belts are not changed often. While I am not a Saab fan right now, I could be. The car looks wonderful and is stylish. But right now it is just a paper weight sitting in the shop. Thanks
 

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I had a guy look it over to get a second opinion on what went wrong. Sure enough the heads shot valves bent and top of piston damaged. So I looked around to find a replacement engine for it. Which it appears to me to be a very rare item that is still in working condition. So I looked at the idea of engine swaps.

This is what I have. The 2nd part was out of a engine swap PDF file I found on the internet. What I have is a car with bad heads, and pistons. As far as I know right now.

Now if I swap the engine out with another Saab v6 engine, I might have the same problem in no time. If it jumps timing. Or is their a chain drive that you can put on these engines to keep them right. I hope this clear it up some.

I just been looking around and it seam that these v6 engines have a problem and jump timing if the belts are not changed often. While I am not a Saab fan right now, I could be. The car looks wonderful and is stylish. But right now it is just a paper weight sitting in the shop. Thanks
Normally, I'd think it'd make more sense to go buy another used SAAB for $2000-3500. (That's what decent examples of NG900s are selling for around here on craigslist.) Still, you said this one had a pampered garaged life and only 24-25K on the odometer-- THAT might make it an exception if it's pristine everywhere but under the hood.

24K was a bit earlier for the belt and tensioner to let go, the normal interval for a change is 30K as I understand it. The miles didn't get it, but what about the raw age of the thing? 17 years is a long time for any rubber component; perhaps it stretched beyond the tensioner's ability to adjust? The other thing I'd wonder when removing it from its berth in that garage is: when was the last time it had an oil change?

At this point, it might make sense to pull the cylinder head and inspect the pistons. There's been damage to the top of the piston heads, but perhaps it's cosmetic? Sometimes these things can be repaired with replacement valves, and not a replacement of the bottom end or cylinder head itself, I guess. It seems like you could proceed with a) valve replacements b) cylinder head replacement or c) b+piston replacement, but it all depends on how much damage was done when it crashed. Hopefully, since it jumped time rather than broke the belt, the impact was minimal. Wishful thinking, perhaps...

Beyond this, all I can say is good luck. Were this any other 17-year-old SAAB, finding another running example might be the most practical solution. A mint car with 24K might be worth the extra expense of repairing. I've not heard the B258I V6 is unreliable, but it is plausible its engineers didn't anticipate a high-years low-mileage maintenance scenario on the timing belt...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well thanks for your advice. I am gonna take the engine apart and order replacement parts for the engine as I replace each broken part. The oil was changed Nov. 2011. So I do not see the oil thing being a problem. The car is spotless inside and out. The carpet is not even dirty any. The leather seats have no stains, rips or tears. The only thing I wondered about is, did the wife use a heavy foot on it. Thanks
 

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and if you are pulling the internal engine apart you will need to change the oil. you are going to find rebuilding that damage will be more expensive than buying a used engine. because chances are you will find damaged pistons, bent valves, and alot of times that puts marks in the valve seat, so you would need to get the seats reground, then buy bigger valves (not just one or 2, all off them because having one or two cyl with bigger valves will make it run weird and throw fuel mixtures all over the chart) and sometimes the bent valve with break the valve guide. then you will need head bolts (they are not reusuable) and a head gasket set (intake exhaust and head gasket all one time use items) timing belt, pulleys and tensioner. chances are one of the pulleys locked up causing the belt to break (from sitting) sure i am forgetting some things. and so on and so forth
 

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For a car with 24K miles, I'd buy the new engine from the saabsite.com. Put it in, the car will be good for another 10+ years.

If you keep you keep up with the belt changes, these cars are reliable. The newer belts go 60K AFAIR compared to 30K on the older one... but the extreme age problem is what got you).

There are probably other rubber related issues to deal with. For example, if those tires are over five years old, I'd look into replacing them. Tires age too, and are actually date coded if you want to check them out.
 
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