SaabCentral Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a used saab 9-3. I noticed the antenna cable was broken in the motor so I bought a replacement antenna with the cable. I got the new antenna working going up and down fine but noticed horrendous radio reception, so I took it all apart again in search of the reception problem. I am now faced with two problems:

1. The motor will not pull the whole cable in when turning radio on and off, only about half of it.
2. How can I fix the poor radio reception once I get the cable back into the motor?

I thought this would be an easy 15 minute project that took most of my weekend so far. Any help would be extremely helpful, and I wouldn't mind any pics or vids that would help me.

Thanks
Josh
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I replaced the motorized antenna with a fixed antenna version. In my opinion the motorized ones are noisy, failure prone, and a general pita.
p/n 400101770 will change that.

My motorized antenna still works though, and I'll sell it to you cheap if you want one for the parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Some tips and info about the motorized antenna.

I fixed mine, only after taking the guts apart. At 10$, the eEuroparts antenna replacement is a good deal (comes with the "wand" and plastic toothed cord).
It *is* possible to just feed it in and have it catch, as long as the old one is out, including the steel sleeve, and you rotate the teeth of the cord so they face the antenna motor. If there are problems, probably have to take the whole motor unit apart to get it out. I did this, and then manually threaded the cord on the gear in the extended position. Then I assembled the unit, and connected the wires with radio off, so that the motor pulled in the antenna. Some little details:
1. If you take the wheel off (which the cord wraps into), make sure the two spring washers are in right - round sides touching each other. This keeps the wheel smashed against the plate, which keeps the nasty springy plastic cord from leaping out and binding, which will result in that clicking sound and a partial retraction of the antenna.
2. If you thread the cord in manually, you can pry out the small gear, allowing you to turn the big gear as you thread it in. Put the antenna fully extended and thread the cord in. There will be about 8" of the cord which needs to be curled up under the wheel. It's tricky to get the wheel back on and covered with the housing, since the cord wants to jump out. I shoved it back in with a thin metal ruler as I put the cover on. This is the hardest part.
3. The circuit is completed through the bracket bolted to the car body (that's why there's that thin ground strap going down the outside of the unit). If you don't have an assistant (or a 9 year old, as in another post), you can turn the radio to the desired on (extend antenna) or off (retract antenna) state, then activate the antenna motor when you're ready, by attaching a wire from the bracket to the car body.
4. The motor has a little mechano-electrical thing which makes it run for just the amount of revolutions to extend (or retract) the antenna. It then flips the state and is ready to receive the next voltage (hi or lo) signal to again retract (or extend) the antenna.
 

·
Registered
1995 NG900 2.3L
Joined
·
818 Posts
I notice that these appear to be lubricated for proper operation. Is there a certain maintenance regimen prescribed for these antennas?

What's a good lubricant?
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top