CBM LS2 Coil Kit - SaabCentral Forums
*
Home Saab Pictures Saab Classifieds Saab Dealer Listings Saab Forum Saab Forum


Go Back   SaabCentral Forums > 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines > 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines

9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines 9-3 SportSedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X, 2003 - 2012 Technical & Repair

SaabCentral.com is the premier Saab All Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 1st May 2016
spikejnz's Avatar
spikejnz spikejnz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013                                                
Location: Olathe, KS
My Saabs: '08 9³ Aero
Posts: 162
Default CBM LS2 Coil Kit

So, like many of you, I was tired of constantly blowing coils. Sure, I can replace the stock coils with OEM Bosch coils, but those are $130-150/each. There are cheaper coils available, even with a lifetime warranty, but they last what ... a few thousand miles on tune? No, I'm not having that anymore. Which leads us to the CBM LS2 Coil Kit.

For those of you that don't know, ParaPat is the brains behind CBM. The quality of the parts I received lives up to what I came to expect perusing these forums. There are two different versions available: the splice-in kit, and the plug-and-play kit. I opted for the latter. All in, I'm VERY happy with how things turned out. No more misfires due to high engine loads, cold-starts, or driving the car on days that end in 'Y'. This thing hauls *** and sounds awesome!

The kit contains ...
  • Coil bracket
  • Custom plug wires
  • Plug-and-play harness
  • Pre-MAF intake pipe
  • All associated hardware

You will also need ...
  • A 3" ID air filter (I used an old 5" AEM Dryflow I had lying around.)
  • LS2 Coils. I used LS2 coils from a ~2002 Silverado 1500 in a junkyard for $10 each, but CBM can supply coils if you need. If you decide to source them yourself, be sure to get used and not new coils, as the updated part number cannot handle boost. The coils I sourced are stamped 19005218, but the part number is D585. Use ONLY used coils that match these part numbers!
  • E16 Torx socket (you can buy a set from Harbor Freight for ~$9)
  • Various sockets (7mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm), screwdrivers, gloves, and some decent spare time.
  • You will also need a modified tune to support these coils. JZW has done this for both Wombat and I now, so let him know that you need a tune to support the LS2 coils, and he'll perform his magic.
  • The stock SAI intake tube connects to the pre-MAF intake tube, and the CBM intake does not have a port to plug it in. Either leave it unfiltered, or have JZW disable the SAI CEL and yank the system off when you install the coils. I opted for the latter, though the pics still show it installed. Ignore that.
  • The kit does come with the pre-MAF portion of the CBM Full Metal Intake, but I opted to order the post-MAF portion as well for an additional fee.
  • While you're in there, it might not be a bad idea to install a fresh set of LFR7AIX plugs.

Foreword
None of this is terribly difficult to do, but it's still possible to mess things up if you don't know what you're doing. Just for the sake of reference, I'd rate this as a 4/10 on a difficulty scale. Take your time and you'll be fine. I'll also mention that I'm not going to be providing instructions on how to remove the airbox, intake, or how to remove the stock coils. There are plenty of how-to guides, and I really just don't want to type all that out.


Installation Instructions
  1. Lay out all parts in an open area, being careful not to misplace anything.
  2. Remove the pre-MAF intake ducting, including the stock airbox.
  3. Connect the CBM pre-MAF tube, and use the supplied allen screw to secure it to the upper radiator core support.
  4. Install your 3" air filter.
  5. Remove the engine cover and oil cap.
  6. Disconnect and remove the ignition coils from cylinders 2, 4, & 6.
  7. Disconnect and remove the ECU from the rear of the intake manifold.
  8. Disconnect all remaining sensors, valves, and all necessary plumbing in order to gain access to the rear coils. Again, there are plenty of how-to articles on SC, but I may update this guide at some point to include detailed steps.
  9. Disconnect and remove the ignition coils from cylinders 1, 3 & 5.
  10. Say goodbye to your old coils.
  11. Lay out or hang (my preferred method) all plug wires in order of length. The order of the wires, from shortest to longest, is as follows: 2, 1, 4, 3, 6, 5.
  12. Lay out the included wiring harness. The shortest is for the front bank of cylinders, and the longest for the rear bank. I neglected to get good, quality pictures of the harness and plug wires, but you can make them out in some of my photos.
  13. Disconnect and remove the upper charge pipe from the intake manifold and set aside. You do have to apply some force to get it out of the couplers, so don't forget to disconnect the IAT sensor.
  14. Route the front CBM adapter harness under the power steering hose, making sure that it will not get pinched or chaffed, and connect them to the stock coil harness.
  15. Route the rear CBM adapter harness on the backside of the engine, making sure that it will not chaff, and connect it to the stock coil harness.
  16. Place a hydraulic jack just under the oil pan, and raise the jack just enough to make contact with the pan, but not so much as to raise the engine. The pan is cast, and we're not actually lifting the engine, so you shouldn't need to use a wood board to protect the pan, but I did anyway.
  17. Using an E16 Torx socket, remove the two bolts on the engine mount closest to the front of the car.
  18. Slide the CBM LS2 Coil bracket into place over the holes, and then reinstall the torx bolts.
  19. Tighten the bolts sufficiently. My torque wrench broke just prior to this, so I just applied "enough" force. The bracket is made of aluminum, so there should be little risk of overtightening the bolts. If in doubt, reference the WIS.
  20. Drill out the holes in each of the coils to provide sufficient room for the bolts to slide through without snagging.
  21. Thread one of the supplied nuts to the end of each of the bolts, and slide through the backside of the bracket.
  22. Slide a short spacer onto each of the four bolts.
  23. Slide the first coil on to the leftmost bolts, as viewed from the side.
  24. Slide the second coil onto the centermost bolts.
  25. Slide the third coil onto the rightmost bolts.
  26. Slide the longest two spacers onto the outside bolts, and the shortest spacers on the inner bolts.
  27. Slide the fourth, fifth, and sixth coils onto the bolts in the same order as above.
  28. Place a washer and nut on each bolt, and loosely tighten them. Fingertight is sufficient, as you will have to loosen them when connecting the coil harness.
  29. Apply dielectric grease to each of the coil connectors, and connect them to the coils in the order show in the picture, referencing the coil number written on each plug. You may need to loosed one of the bracket bolts in order to make sufficient room to connect the plug.

  30. Slide the aluminum plug wire rentention brackets over the plug wire boots, and push the rubber boot seal inside the bracket. This seal will rotate 360º, allowing you to reposition the bracket later on.
  31. Feed the plug wires for cyls 2, 4, & 6 under the power steering hose.
  32. Starting with cylinder #6, apply dielectric grease to the plug wire boot and install it. Use the included Allen bolt to secure the bracket into position.
  33. Apply dielectric grease to the coil boot and install over the corresponding coil, using this image as reference.
  34. Repeat the above step with cylinders 4 and 2, then repeat the steps on the rear cylinders.
  35. Once you are satisfied that all wires are routed and connected properly, and that no risk for burning, chaffing or cutting exists, tighten the bolts on the coil bracket to securely fasten all coils into position.
  36. Reinstall the upper charge pipe, making sure to line up the position markings on the couplers with the arrows on the hoses.
  37. Reinstall and reconnect all wires, sensors, and vacuum fittings.
  38. Reinstall the ECU.
  39. Flash the tune you received from JZW, and start the car.
  40. If you performed all steps properly, your car should be running like normal, with the added bonus of being able to handle whatever you could ever want to throw at it.


Other notes
If you decide to order the post-MAF section from CBM as well, be sure to retain your crankcase PCV connector, which is attached to the dipstick. You can use a razor to very carefully remove all the hard vacuum line and create a new vacuum line, retaining the push-on connector and the PCV valve. You will need 6" each of 11/32 and 1/4 (IIRC) vacuum hose (~6" of each, ~$4 total).


Last edited by spikejnz; 2nd May 2016 at 10:52 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 1st May 2016
Diggs's Avatar
Diggs Diggs is online now
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2003                                                
Location: Flyover Country
My Saabs: 2003 9³SS Linear; 2015 VW GTI
Posts: 18,738
Thumbs up

Great writeup!
__________________
The answer is almost always....Tech2.
You can either buy one or be a slave to your mechanic/dealer when you need repairs. Your choice.

Never have less than TWO working key fobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3  
Old 5th May 2016
swedespeed7's Avatar
swedespeed7 swedespeed7 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010                                                
Location: Chicago
My Saabs: 2008 9³ Aero SS, 2011 9-4X Aero
Posts: 9,230
Garage
Default

Agreed, superb write-up. Thank you!

Question though - what happens when we can't find the proper used coils anymore?
__________________
Past SAABs: '93, '94, and '95 9000 Aeros, '01 Viggen, '09 2.0T SS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
  #4  
Old 5th May 2016
spikejnz's Avatar
spikejnz spikejnz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013                                                
Location: Olathe, KS
My Saabs: '08 9³ Aero
Posts: 162
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by swedespeed7 View Post
Agreed, superb write-up. Thank you!

Question though - what happens when we can't find the proper used coils anymore?
Quick edit: the engine these coils I sourced are from is the LM7, not the LS2. Same as LS2 for the most part, but designed for trucks.

Thanks! Running out of used coils is highly unlikely, given the HUGE number of engines that GM produced between 1999 and 2007. That includes:
  • 2002-2005 Escalade
  • 2002-2006 Chevy Avalanche
  • 2003-2007 Chevy Express / GCM Savana
  • 1999-2007 Chevy Silverado 1500
  • 1999-2007 GMC Sierra 1500
  • 2000-2006 Chevy Suburban/GCM Yukon XL
  • 2000-2006 Chevy Tahoe/GCM Yukon

I doubt there will EVER come a time that these aren't available in a junkyard until well past the point that it becomes viable to modify the 9³ SS.

HOWEVER, you can run aftermarket "hot" coils, like Accel or MSD.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5  
Old 5th May 2016
swedespeed7's Avatar
swedespeed7 swedespeed7 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010                                                
Location: Chicago
My Saabs: 2008 9³ Aero SS, 2011 9-4X Aero
Posts: 9,230
Garage
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spikejnz View Post
Quick edit: the engine these coils I sourced are from is the LM7, not the LS2. Same as LS2 for the most part, but designed for trucks.

Thanks! Running out of used coils is highly unlikely, given the HUGE number of engines that GM produced between 1999 and 2007. That includes:
  • 2002-2005 Escalade
  • 2002-2006 Chevy Avalanche
  • 2003-2007 Chevy Express / GCM Savana
  • 1999-2007 Chevy Silverado 1500
  • 1999-2007 GMC Sierra 1500
  • 2000-2006 Chevy Suburban/GCM Yukon XL
  • 2000-2006 Chevy Tahoe/GCM Yukon

I doubt there will EVER come a time that these aren't available in a junkyard until well past the point that it becomes viable to modify the 9³ SS.

HOWEVER, you can run aftermarket "hot" coils, like Accel or MSD.
Makes sense, thanks for clarifying.
__________________
Past SAABs: '93, '94, and '95 9000 Aeros, '01 Viggen, '09 2.0T SS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6  
Old 5th May 2016
turbojohnny's Avatar
turbojohnny turbojohnny is offline
Saab Lunatic
 
Join Date: Oct 2007                                                
Location: Orchard Park, ny
My Saabs: No more SAABs
Posts: 1,888
Default

I don't even have a 2.8t 9-3ss, but this is awesome. I love seeing solutions like this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7  
Old 5th May 2016
Diggs's Avatar
Diggs Diggs is online now
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2003                                                
Location: Flyover Country
My Saabs: 2003 9³SS Linear; 2015 VW GTI
Posts: 18,738
Thumbs up

Step 10 is my favorite.
__________________
The answer is almost always....Tech2.
You can either buy one or be a slave to your mechanic/dealer when you need repairs. Your choice.

Never have less than TWO working key fobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8  
Old 7th May 2016
Nijee's Avatar
Nijee Nijee is offline
Saab Lunatic
 
Join Date: May 2011                                                
Location: Wollongong, Australia
My Saabs: 2009 9-3 Vector SS, 2008 Turbo X SS
Posts: 2,224
Default

Buy Bosch 112 coils. Three years at Stage 5 JZW, no failures. Simplier solution.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9  
Old 7th May 2016
swedespeed7's Avatar
swedespeed7 swedespeed7 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010                                                
Location: Chicago
My Saabs: 2008 9³ Aero SS, 2011 9-4X Aero
Posts: 9,230
Garage
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nijee View Post
Buy Bosch 112 coils. Three years at Stage 5 JZW, no failures. Simplier solution.
Can you elaborate on this?
__________________
Past SAABs: '93, '94, and '95 9000 Aeros, '01 Viggen, '09 2.0T SS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10  
Old 9th May 2016
Nijee's Avatar
Nijee Nijee is offline
Saab Lunatic
 
Join Date: May 2011                                                
Location: Wollongong, Australia
My Saabs: 2009 9-3 Vector SS, 2008 Turbo X SS
Posts: 2,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by swedespeed7 View Post
Can you elaborate on this?
Bosch coil that end with 104 are std in our cars. The same part # but ends in 112 are used in higher output applications of our engines such as Caddy so are better suited to tuned engines. Have not had one fail and have set a challenge for anyone to come forward who has. Several threads here about coils.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11  
Old 9th May 2016
swedespeed7's Avatar
swedespeed7 swedespeed7 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010                                                
Location: Chicago
My Saabs: 2008 9³ Aero SS, 2011 9-4X Aero
Posts: 9,230
Garage
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nijee View Post
Bosch coil that end with 104 are std in our cars. The same part # but ends in 112 are used in higher output applications of our engines such as Caddy so are better suited to tuned engines. Have not had one fail and have set a challenge for anyone to come forward who has. Several threads here about coils.
Good to know
__________________
Past SAABs: '93, '94, and '95 9000 Aeros, '01 Viggen, '09 2.0T SS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12  
Old 9th May 2016
spikejnz's Avatar
spikejnz spikejnz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013                                                
Location: Olathe, KS
My Saabs: '08 9³ Aero
Posts: 162
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nijee View Post
Bosch coil that end with 104 are std in our cars. The same part # but ends in 112 are used in higher output applications of our engines such as Caddy so are better suited to tuned engines. Have not had one fail and have set a challenge for anyone to come forward who has. Several threads here about coils.
Yeah I got mixed info on those. Some people said they were solid, others said they're good for a while and then crap out like the 104s. I figure, for the same price, why not get something that will NEVER fail? Plus, they look pretty trick under the hood!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13  
Old 16th May 2016
Nijee's Avatar
Nijee Nijee is offline
Saab Lunatic
 
Join Date: May 2011                                                
Location: Wollongong, Australia
My Saabs: 2009 9-3 Vector SS, 2008 Turbo X SS
Posts: 2,224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spikejnz View Post
Yeah I got mixed info on those. Some people said they were solid, others said they're good for a while and then crap out like the 104s. I figure, for the same price, why not get something that will NEVER fail? Plus, they look pretty trick under the hood!
Yeah, still looking for those people who have had the 112s fail. Given I am a sample size of only one, bit hard to draw definitive conclusion just from my experience. But for me, they have been they are rock solid.

I can see the benefits from this upgrade if you are going for a mega build. Think I am probably at the limit at what the 112s can handle. I also like the OEM look under the hood.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #14  
Old 16th May 2016
spikejnz's Avatar
spikejnz spikejnz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013                                                
Location: Olathe, KS
My Saabs: '08 9³ Aero
Posts: 162
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nijee View Post
Yeah, still looking for those people who have had the 112s fail. Given I am a sample size of only one, bit hard to draw definitive conclusion just from my experience. But for me, they have been they are rock solid.

I can see the benefits from this upgrade if you are going for a mega build. Think I am probably at the limit at what the 112s can handle. I also like the OEM look under the hood.
Yeah and that's basically why I went this route. The 9³ is going to become the toy car here in a year or two, at which point i'll go nuts with the upgrades, because who cares?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15  
Old 25th May 2016
Not-a-Jet Not-a-Jet is offline
Active Member
 
Join Date: May 2016                                                
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
My Saabs: 07 9-3 Aero Stg 0
Posts: 37
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nijee View Post
Buy Bosch 112 coils. Three years at Stage 5 JZW, no failures. Simplier solution.
Would they work just as great and last longer in a non tuned car? Also, what spark plugs are you using with them?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #16  
Old 25th May 2016
fd3toe46's Avatar
fd3toe46 fd3toe46 is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2009                                                
Location: Socal
My Saabs: TurboX 6MT/08Aero(Sold)/Vector(Sold)
Posts: 951
Default

I've been using the cheap ACDelco coils for over 2 years in a tuned V6 myself and still going strong. But I would consider an option like this IF I didn't have to run an open air intake setup.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #17  
Old 5th January 2017
Slywiliez Slywiliez is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017                                                
Location: NE ohio
My Saabs: 2008 Turbo X Sc
Posts: 27
Default

With this LS2 coil swap is there any codes thrown? I heard that the resistance is different and the ECU reads them as being a bad coil. Sorry if I missed something in the write up about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #18  
Old 26th January 2017
kazkillinger kazkillinger is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013                                                
Location: elpaso texas
My Saabs: 07 9-3 2.0T , 06 9-3 Aero
Posts: 169
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slywiliez View Post
With this LS2 coil swap is there any codes thrown? I heard that the resistance is different and the ECU reads them as being a bad coil. Sorry if I missed something in the write up about it.
read step 39
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #19  
Old 19th April 2017
2009xwd 2009xwd is offline
Active Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016                                                
Location: Washington
My Saabs: 2009 9-3 aero xwd v6
Posts: 49
Default

I have yet to be able to get a hold of him for this product amongst others.... Is he no longer selling this product? I've emailed him a couple times and nothing....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #20  
Old 19th April 2017
Diggs's Avatar
Diggs Diggs is online now
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2003                                                
Location: Flyover Country
My Saabs: 2003 9³SS Linear; 2015 VW GTI
Posts: 18,738
Default

He sold his car and bought a Chevy SS. Sorry.
__________________
The answer is almost always....Tech2.
You can either buy one or be a slave to your mechanic/dealer when you need repairs. Your choice.

Never have less than TWO working key fobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Bookmarks

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SaabCentral Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LS2 Coilpacks on TX Snikpoh1390 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines 4 30th April 2019 10:57 PM
2008 9-7x Aero 6.0 ls2 V8 AWD Carbon Flash Metallic gytre1 Cars for Sale - North America 14 25th August 2014 09:24 AM
LS2 Swap into a 5.3i timg Saab 9-2X, 9-4X & 9-7X Workshop 25 24th April 2014 12:03 PM
Looking for 9-5 coil spring spacers/lift kit zyme 9-5 Performance, Mods & Tuning 5 10th July 2009 09:40 PM
LS2 for 9-7x??? CosmicSaab Saab 9-2X, 9-4X & 9-7X Workshop 38 14th February 2005 06:50 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:05 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

top of page | sitemap | email us



copyright © 2003 - 2011 saabcentral.com, All rights reserved http://www.whiter.co.uk - valid xhtml - valid css
SaabCentral is an independently run website and is not affiliated in any way to Saab Automobile AB.

vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
 

Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.