How To: Clutch & Flywheel Replacement (5 spd) - SaabCentral Forums
*
Home Saab Pictures Saab Classifieds Saab Dealer Listings Saab Forum Saab Forum


Go Back   SaabCentral Forums > 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines > 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines

9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines 9-3 SportSedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X, 2003 - 2012 Technical & Repair

SaabCentral.com is the premier Saab All Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 1st January 2017
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default How To: Clutch & Flywheel Replacement (5 spd)

After 11 years and 192,000 miles (60k of which were tuned w/ BSR stage 1), Annalie's clutch had had enough. At 80k miles, the dual-mass flywheel had also started acting up under full-throttle (tuned) acceleration, slamming back and forth with the torque fluctuations. This necessitated returning the tune to stock, and ever since then the drivetrain has felt a little bit "loose", like there was some play in it. Therefore, when the clutch finally started slipping, I decided that it was time to replace the flywheel with a single-mass (solid) replacement, which would require a sprung clutch disk. The DMF to solid Flywheel thread was incredibly helpful, although I couldn't find one of the OEM solid flywheels for sale that were mentioned. I wanted to keep approximately the same flywheel inertia to avoid gear or timing chain rattling in my daily driver, especially at low engine speeds & high loads when inter-cycle torque fluctuations can be the greatest. Therefore, I went with the Spec steel flywheel and the GMPP clutch kit that was mentioned in the other thread. The full shopping list is here:

Spec SMF, Steel. PN S23SS
GM PP LSJ Clutch Kit, PN 19212712
Engine Rear Main Bearing Seal, PN Timken 710237
Transmission Input Seal, PN National 222630 !!! This Isnt Necessary - The GM PP Clutch Kit comes with the slave cylinder, which has a new transmission input seal installed in it !!!
Trans Output Shaft Seal, PN National 3543
5 liters MTF 0063 - 1.5 is fill amount, and I'll flush it 2x before the final fill since it's been close to 100k miles since I last flushed it

The steps should be the same for the Spec or Fidanza aluminum flywheels or the OEM flywheels. Basically, the front subframe needs to be removed in order to drop the transmission, and everything in the way of that needs to come off.

1. Pop out the front wheel center covers so that you can get a 32mm socket onto the driveshaft nuts. Its easier to unscrew them with the wheels on and the car on the ground so that the wheels can't rotate. (I did this part slightly out of order)

Take the wheels off, then jack up the front of the car and support it firmly on jack stands at the mounting points. [Disclaimer here - if you hurt yourself following these instructions, it's not my fault, these are for reference only]
2. Disconnect the battery and remove it (Negative Terminal first to avoid accidental shorts). Remove the battery tray and air duct to it, leaving the hood switch and fuse box loose in place.
3. Drain the transmission fluid. First, make sure that the fill plug comes out - this way air can get in as fluid drains, plus you never want to drain something that you aren't sure you can refill later. For the drain plug, I cut off 3/4" of an 8mm allen key to fit between the subframe and the drain plug, and then loosened it with an 8mm open-end wrench

4. Pop the two transmission cables off of their lever arms. It's just a ball & socket joint, I used a pair of needle-nosed pliers as a lever to stick between the cable end and the arm coming out of the transmission. Unscrew the two bolts holding the transmission cable mount to the transmission.

5. Clamp off the line from the clutch master cylinder so it won't leak when disconnected. I just used a piece of rubber wrapped around the soft line with vice grips to clamp it closed. Detach the clutch hydraulic line from the connection at the transmission (where the bleed valve is). There is a metal clip that holds the rubber line into the plastic "f" piece that needs to be popped out.
6. Unbolt the lower control arms from the hub assemblies and slide the outer ball joint out of the spindle. Pull the hub assemblies (still attached to the strut, tie rod, sway bar link etc) out away from the car and knock the driveshafts out through the hubs to free them. I needed to hammer the driveshafts on both sides pretty severely, so I threaded the axle nut back on to try to avoid damaging the threads too much.

7. Remove both driveshafts from the engine. The passenger-side one will pop out of the bearing supporting it on the engine block (pass side & driver side are identical). You can remove the supporting driveshaft and bearing from the passenger side now too, but its easier once the subframe is off.
8. Unbolt the exhaust system from the end of the catalyst. They are 3 11mm nuts that are likely very rusted onto the studs in the catalyst. Hit them with a penetrating oil like PB Blaster a few times, then take it nice and easy getting them off. If they start to unscrew but then bind up, STOP, tighten them a turn and hit the exposed stud with more PB blaster and a wire brush to remove corrosion. The worst thing you could do would be to force it and strip or break one of the studs here. Once the exhaust system is unbolted, pull the rubber hangers off of it from front to back to free it from the car, and set it aside
9. While the engine & transmission are firmly bolted in place, break loose all of the bolts holding them together. There are two on top (one under the oil cooler, one back under the vacuum pump), one over the starter, two over the rear transmission mount to the subframe (one is hidden pretty well - look for the shiny socket in the middle of the picture below. The other one is in the foreground, also in the middle), and two on the very bottom. I unscrewed all of them completely except for the one furthest to the bottom since it was easy to access, and I'd rather be doing all of this work with the engine firmly in place.

10. Unbolt the steering rack from the subframe. There are two long bolts (15mm heads) that go through both the subframe and the rack, with lock-nuts (18mm sockets) on top. I'm pointing at the hole for one in the picture below.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 1st January 2017
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default

11. Remove the front plastic underbelly panel below the radiator. Support the radiator, intercooler, & AC condensor assembly from above. Make sure that whatever you use to support them only captures them, and not the subframe as well. Unbolt the two lower brackets for them, and remove them from the subframe. I removed them from the car completely, but you can probably leave them attached to the power steering line brackets to hang there.


12. Suspend the engine from above. I used an engine hoist and chain around the flange for the power steering pump on the head. You can use one of those supports that bridges the strut towers as well. Tighten it to take the weight off of the lower mounts.

13. Detach the lower transmission mounts from the subframe. It is a single long bolt for each of them. You can remove the mounts from the transmission as well, but this is much easier once the subframe is removed, and probably isn't strictly necessary.
14. Mark where the subframe meets the chassis (spray paint works well). Break the subframe bolts free and loosten the front bolts by about 3 turns and the rear bolts by about 10 turns. This will give you room to reach the sway bar bracket bolts. Unbolt the sway bar brackets.
15. Detach the power steering lines from the subframe (two plastic clips along the passenger side). Detach the suspension sensor wiring and connector from the driver side. I removed the aluminum charge air pipe between the turbocharger and the intercooler at this point too. It probably wasn't strictly necessary, but it got it out of the way for unbolting other pieces and supporting the engine from below.
16. Support the subframe with a jack and some wood or other long piece of material. Completely unbolt it, lower it, and slide it out from under the car (with the lower control arms still attached).

17. Unbolt the upper transmission mount from the transmission (underneath where the battery box used to be). Lower the driver side of the engine & trans combo about 3 inches to allow the transmission to slide out & clear the chassis. Don't let it go completely slack, as this could break the one remaining engine mount.
18. Support the transmission with a jack. It's very heavy and you don't want to damage it or yourself when removing it from the engine. Undo the one remaining bolt and it should slide right off the engine. Lower it and remove it from under the car.

19. Lift the engine back up again to avoid overstressing the last engine mount. I supported it from underneath with a jack stand as well, just to be sure.
20. Now that it's out, replace the slave cylinder, clutch tube and output shaft seals. I had to re-use the "f" piece with the clutch bleed on it - make sure that this is nice and clean with no debris in it. The plastic piece that affixes the clutch tube to the bellhousing also needed to be transferred from the old clutch tube to the new one. DO NOT bench-bleed the slave cylinder, this will almost certainly damage it! Some good instructions for bleeding the clutch are on the site above where I bought the GM PP clutch kit with the slave cylinder.


For tomorrow - the rest of the job...

Last edited by toplessFC3Sman; 1st January 2017 at 06:41 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3  
Old 2nd January 2017
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default

21. Time to remove the old pressure plate, clutch and flywheel from the engine. The pressure plate was held on with 6 torx bolts around the periphery, one of which decided it wouldn't come out. I solved this by just cutting the pressure plate around the bolt, since both the flywheel and pressure plate were getting replaced anyway. I just stuck a screwdriver in through some of the holes in the pressure plate to keep the engine from spinning while removing the other bolts. Remove the pressure plate and clutch so that you're left with just the flywheel.

22. Unbolt the flywheel from the end of the crankshaft. I screwed back in two of the pressure plate bolts partially and used a crow bar to keep the engine from spinning. Zip-tieing the crow bar to these bolts helped a lot so that you didn't have to hold it and it would just spin until hitting the ground. I broke all of the bolts free first, then left one in loosely while doing the rest just to keep the flywheel in place until the very end. Careful removing it from the engine, it's a bit heavy.

23. Once the flywheel is off, I replaced the rear main seal. Just screw a small drywall or wood screw into it and pull, it'll slide right out. Press the new seal in evenly and gently to avoid denting or tearing it. Running your finger around the inside of it to make sure that the inner lip is in place and not getting hung up on the crankshaft is essential.


Now, to compare the old and the new parts:

The Spec steel flywheel was about 0.5 lbs lighter than the OEM dual-mass flywheel, and dimensionally was almost identical. I had asked them to install 8mm dowel pins to fit the GM PP clutch kit, so this difference was expected. There were a few detail differences, but nothing that seemed critical.


The mounting surface for the pressure plate was about 1mm taller with the Spec flywheel, but the total stack-up with the PP and clutch disk was about the same.


The GM PP pressure plate appeared a little bit thicker, but this was only because the ends of the fingers extended out a little bit further.



The clutch disk material looked very similar, and oddly the used clutch disk did not seem very worn. It was 7.8mm thick, while the new one was 7.95mm, and there was still a bit of meat before the rivets would be exposed. Of course the GM PP clutch has a sprung center since the solid flywheel no longer has any give to it, which the OEM clutch does not need with the dual-mass flywheel.


The new & OEM slave cylinders looked functionally identical - no significant differences. These have the transmission input shaft seal integrated into them, so there was no need to buy a separate seal.


The whole new assembly of Spec steel flywheel, GM PP pressure plate and clutch disk weighed a total of 0.8 lbs MORE than the OEM combination, due to the beefier pressure plate, solid flywheel, and sprung clutch hub.

Reassembly: It is basically the reverse of dis-assembly. I'm going to skip a few steps here, and only touch on the bits that seemed more difficult or that I have seen people ask about on the forum here.

I used loc-tite blue on the flywheel-to-crankshaft bolts and followed the OEM torque spec - it is tighten to a specific torque, then go 40 degrees. This seemed like little enough that I wouldn't expect any plastic deformation in the bolts, so it seemed safe to re-use them. Again, use the crow-bar and zip-tie trick to hold the flywheel, but reversed from before for tightening.


Wrestling the transmission back up into place took a bit of effort. What I eventually did was support the engine from below with one jack to free up the the engine crane. Then, wrap a cinching tie-down strap around the transmission with the ratcheting tensioner on one side. The tensioner will allow you to adjust the rotation of the transmission to get everything to line up properly. Then, use the crane to lift the transmission (with the straps going through the engine bay), and another jack (or your arm) to hold up the right-most portion in the image below to get the pitch of the input shaft right to slide into the clutch and flywheel. Rotating the flywheel slightly helps to get the splines to align. I put some wheel bearing grease on the splines of the trans input shaft, and then wiped it off with a clean towel to only leave a thin coating within the splines - this can help with any chatter between the clutch and the input shaft. DO NOT put very much on, as this can squeeze out and get flung onto the clutch disk, contaminating it and causing it to slip.


I bled the clutch as soon as the transmission was back in the car and supported by the upper transmission mount, just to save myself some reassembly work if something seemed amiss. I used a hand-held vacuum pump, some rubber line, and the inside of an adapter for pressurizing coolant systems. This was basically a flat piece of plastic with a rubber seal and a nipple passing through it. Re-connect all of the clutch hydraulics, fill up the brake master cylinder reservoir so that you can start to see fluid on the inside top of the reservoir, and hold the adapter over the open top of the reservoir. My setup leaked a little bit so I had to keep pumping it to maintain a vacuum (cheap hand-held vacuum pump), but it sucked a lot of bubbles out of the clutch line. Make sure that you keep the reservoir topped up with fresh fluid - as bubbles come out the fluid will replace them and the level will fall. The clutch only fills from the top 1/4 or so of the reservoir, so keeping the level high is essential. Once you've done this, bleed the clutch the conventional way using the nipple on the top of the plastic "f" piece and a helper to pump the clutch pedal.


While removing the driveshafts from the hubs (with a big hammer), I severely buggered up one of the nuts and threads on the shaft. To fix this, I had to grind off about 2 1/2 threads on the end of the driveshaft, and about 1 thread on the inside of the nut. I know that it is not ideal for the nut (I don't care about the threads on the driveshaft - the first 15 aren't engaged when the nut is installed anyway), but since I could only find replacement nuts online and could only get them in a week, I had to clean up what I had, and added some loc-tite to keep them from loosening. I'll replace them when the new ones arrive, but I have to get to work before then, so it'll have to do...


The last bit is to get an alignment afterwards - all of the front suspension was disassembled, and things never go back together exactly the same.

Overall, disassembly took about 8 hours of slow, careful work, and re-assembly took about 6 hours. I'm sure that this could be improved upon a lot, but I wanted to take my time and make sure that I wasn't messing anything up. Plus, this was a good chance to check out the rest of the suspension bushings, rust, and anything else.

I've driven her about 6 miles since completing the job, and so far everything feels remarkably normal. No clutch slipping, no chatter or strange noises, the clutch is a little heavier but not by much - comparable to the Mazda5 and Celica also in the driveway, and the take-up is nice and smooth. It'll take me about a week to put on the recommended 500 break-in miles, and I'll report back sometime around then to confirm that everything is holding up well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
  #4  
Old 2nd January 2017
RoseJoe RoseJoe is offline
Active Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015                                                
Location: Sydney
My Saabs: 2004 Saab 9-3 5 spd, Sachs Cobalt Clutch
Posts: 104
Default

My son and I took more than 14hours, being in a new for us workshop took time to find the tools.

Its been almost 1year and the clutch has been fine (tracked the car 3 times since).

Great writeup and photos!
__________________
TD04-14T, 64lbs Siemens Inj, GS down pipe, 3" exhaust and dual Aero Outlet, 3" IC, JZW tune
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5  
Old 3rd January 2017
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default

Sooo... that 500 mile break-in thing I mentioned before went out the window. Sure, I'm not going to be power-shifting the car for a while (not that I normally do on my commute anyway), but I couldn't resist seeing how she felt with more power again. I flashed the BSR stage 1 tune back onto the ECU last night, and after re-gapping the plugs to 0.85mm this morning, the extra torque feels very nice.

The very harsh shuddering that originally caused me to de-tune the ECU has not reappeared with the solid flywheel, which lends some credence to the theory that the DMF was loose or broken and internally "hammering" as it hit it's stops and rebounded with more that stock torque. This is backed up by the ~15 degrees of free play that I could feel in the DMF just twisting it by hand, and the additional "slop" that I could feel in the drivetrain before, especially going from coasting to moderate or heavy throttle. This seems to have disappeared with the solid flywheel & new clutch too. I'll keep updating this thread if any of these reappears or other symptoms pop up, but so far I'm very happy with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6  
Old 3rd January 2017
Diggs's Avatar
Diggs Diggs is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2003                                                
Location: Flyover Country
My Saabs: 2003 9³SS Linear; 2015 VW GTI
Posts: 18,746
Thumbs up

Nice...
Added to the How To sticky.
__________________
The answer is almost always....Tech2.
You can either buy one or be a slave to your mechanic/dealer when you need repairs. Your choice.

Never have less than TWO working key fobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7  
Old 16th January 2017
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default

800 miles on, and everything feels fine so far. For the most part, I've completely adjusted to the new feel of the clutch and pressure plate, and I've been loving the additional boost of the tune (fuel economy has suffered slightly). I did go in the next weekend and replace both front LCAs, all the tie rod ends, and both wheel bearings since I think I damaged them on both sides when pounding the driveshafts out of the hubs. I had applied some wheel bearing grease to the splines of the driveshafts in the hubs, and the splines between the pass side and the fixed driveshaft when reassembling everything. This helped them to slide out nice and smoothly with barely a tap on the end when I needed to disassemble for the wheel bearings.

In hindsight, I'd recommend doing all the tie rod ends, lower control arms, and wheel bearings at the same time as the clutch & flywheel, since much of the disassembly is the same. Ultimately, I needed to pull the entire knuckles off of the car (with wheel bearing, hub, and brake rotor) so that I could grind down some rust inside of the brake rotor to get it off of the hub, and then to make it easier to press the wheel bearing and hub out of the knuckle without risking damage to other parts. This meant that I repeated about 2 hours of work to get the car jacked up, get the LCAs off and driveshafts out, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8  
Old 7th March 2017
foxtrapper foxtrapper is offline
SaabNut!
 
Join Date: Jul 2015                                                
Location: USA
My Saabs: 04 convertible
Posts: 291
Default

Well written and documented! Thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9  
Old 10th July 2018
photousa's Avatar
photousa photousa is offline
Saab Lunatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2009                                                
Location: Chicago, lL
My Saabs: 2003 Saab 9-5 Aero Wagon 2.3T HO Manual
Posts: 2,238
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toplessFC3Sman View Post
20. Now that it's out, replace the slave cylinder, clutch tube and output shaft seals. I had to re-use the "f" piece with the clutch bleed on it - make sure that this is nice and clean with no debris in it. The plastic piece that affixes the clutch tube to the bellhousing also needed to be transferred from the old clutch tube to the new one. DO NOT bench-bleed the slave cylinder, this will almost certainly damage it! Some good instructions for bleeding the clutch are on the site above where I bought the GM PP clutch kit with the slave cylinder.


For tomorrow - the rest of the job...
I really like your method for dropping the subframe, makes the most sense yet. Is that a 1 x 6 ? I'm going to be doing this on my '03 9-5 so I need to do the same with dropping my subframe. Wish I knew the dimensions of the subframe in advance.

You mention not to bench bleed the slave cylinder, that it may cause damage. Others recommend slowly bench bleeding it saying its almost impossible to fully bleed it after it's installed. I'm going to need to decide which way to go..
__________________
2003 Saab 9-5 Aero Sport Wagon >>> My other home:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

2.3T HO B235R Manual 157,000 miles
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10  
Old 10th July 2018
qwikredline qwikredline is offline
Saab on the Brain!
 
Join Date: Apr 2012                                                
Location: Blackstock Ontario
My Saabs: 2007 9.5 Combi Sport
Posts: 5,889
Default

after a while the misinformation gets boring. CED clutch info does not include priming the TOB which is 100% the best way and is detailed by saab, in the wis.
Take a hose from the clutch pipe elbow bury it in a tin of brake fluid on one end and the other attached to the elbow. You have already installed TOB ( a little grease on the spigot is good) and the clutch pipe and the elbow. ( you posted pictures)

depress the TOB slowly and release a few times to fill it up with fluid. remove hose. cap elbow done

put a rag underneath the elbow. when you install the trans and bolt it up assuming your flywheel and clutch is correct the TOB will press against the pressure plate and a little brake fluid will come out. NORMAL. For those who don't know the TOB is in constant engagement with the pressure plate. There is no air gap.
Bolt trans to engine

Now make sure the feed line from the fluid reservoir is dripping fluid ( reservoir is full0 and hook it up. Now go and press the clutch pedal up and down a few times you will have disengagement and there is no need to bleed.

end story. bolt up the rest of the stuff and the subframe etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11  
Old 16th July 2018
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by photousa View Post
I really like your method for dropping the subframe, makes the most sense yet. Is that a 1 x 6 ? I'm going to be doing this on my '03 9-5 so I need to do the same with dropping my subframe. Wish I knew the dimensions of the subframe in advance.

You mention not to bench bleed the slave cylinder, that it may cause damage. Others recommend slowly bench bleeding it saying its almost impossible to fully bleed it after it's installed. I'm going to need to decide which way to go..
I had no problem with bleeding the clutch, and it did not feel any more spongy or soft than it had before. The vacuum drawn on the brake master cylinder may have helped get out more air than a typical bleed, but I have been satisfied with the clutch feel after doing it the way I described. The method proposed by qwikredline is a more thorough, and could allow you to move the TOB into different orientations while pressing it to potentially remove any high spots that could trap a little air - I don't really know how the piston is internally fed and whether this is a design issue or not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12  
Old 16th July 2018
qwikredline qwikredline is offline
Saab on the Brain!
 
Join Date: Apr 2012                                                
Location: Blackstock Ontario
My Saabs: 2007 9.5 Combi Sport
Posts: 5,889
Default

my description is NOT BLEEDING. its PRIMING. There is a huge difference.
done the way I described there is no need to bleed. The TOB is already mounted on the transmission so I am not sure what is meant by moving the TOB orientation.
Air bubbles rise to the surface in a liquid. Therefore once primed, hoses connected and pedal stroked you have clutch disengagement. Any tiny air bubbles left will rise to the master cylinder reservoir. Its a pretty good vertical climb.

Does not apply to brakes, HOWEVER when using a mityvac on brakes you (assuming installation of a new caliper for example) BEFORE using the mityvac or similar , it is essential to stroke the brake pedal to move fluid into the caliper. If you don't, the mityvac will probably never be able to draw fluid to the caliper, as the loosened bleed nipple will cause insufficient vacuum to draw brake fluid all the way to the caliper. Stroke first, get fluid in the caliper, then do the mityvac gig when doing brakes.

The thing with trying to mityvac the clutch TOB is that the elbow nipple is 6 inches higher than the TOB the TOB hydraulic cylinder is pretty large bore, and the fluid when drawn from the reservoir draws into the mityvac; unless you stroke the clutch pedal in advance the brake fluid wont get to the TOB. AND without priming , the fluid when pushed down to the TOB just sits up against the big air bubble , and this air bubble has no place to go but backwards up to the elbow where the bleed nipple is. PRIMING when you think about it is just common sense. What I cant understand is why SAAB say to prime, and GM for al the F35 cars ( or others for that matter) don't say diddly about priming. weird. I struggled for years doing it the usual pump and bleed way. PRIMING? I can do this clutch actuation stuff in five seconds in my sleep.

Last edited by qwikredline; 16th July 2018 at 05:15 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13  
Old 18th July 2018
toplessFC3Sman's Avatar
toplessFC3Sman toplessFC3Sman is offline
Saab Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2009                                                
Location: MI
My Saabs: '06 9-3 2.0T
Posts: 579
Default

I don't think I called your method "bleeding", since it clearly isn't. I didn't know what to call it, so I omitted a term in my reply.

By "different orientations", all I meant was that if there was a local high spot in the throw-out bearing that could trap air when it was oriented normally when installed, it would be a lot easier to rock the throw-out bearing and transmission around to try to get that air out than it would be to rock the whole engine and car around once the transmission was installed. I don't know if there is such a high spot - it wouldn't make sense from a design perspective, but you never know...

The way I did the vacuum bleed was by leaving the bleed valve closed and just applying vacuum to the brake MC. The brake fluid would not expand under vacuum, but any air bubbles would, making them less dense and increasing the buoyant forces that would cause them to rise to the top of the reservoir out of the TOB and tubing. As any bubbles increase in size, they may also move out of any local high spots because they expand far enough to escape - sort of a reverse-siphoning. The brake fluid will get down to the TOB just fine with this method just due to gravity and the increased buoyancy of the air bubbles, and it does not draw the brake fluid up into the vacuum pump.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Bookmarks

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SaabCentral Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale: Used clutch / flywheel derf Parts for Sale/Wanted - North America 0 4th September 2013 03:01 PM
Clutch replacement. What side goes on the flywheel? sakpase 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines 2 29th August 2013 12:10 AM
New Clutch and Flywheel jonnyblanch 9-5 Workshop 10 17th January 2013 06:28 PM
Clutch & FlyWheel options Saab-o-matic NG900 & OG9-3 Performance, Mods & Tuning 8 26th June 2011 01:20 AM
Clutch + Flywheel GBS 9-3 Sedan, Convertible ('04+)/Combi & 9-3X Workshop - ALL Engines 5 5th August 2010 04:49 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:43 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

top of page | sitemap | email us



copyright © 2003 - 2011 saabcentral.com, All rights reserved http://www.whiter.co.uk - valid xhtml - valid css
SaabCentral is an independently run website and is not affiliated in any way to Saab Automobile AB.

vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
 

Garage Plus vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.