Brembo conversion. Do I have a problem? Pics inside [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: Brembo conversion. Do I have a problem? Pics inside


96mn12
7th June 2014, 07:16 PM
Hey everyone.

So, I ended up paying a shop to swap in the brakes since the bolts broke. On a long highway drive earlier today, I find my rims like the pictures posted. Covered in fluid. Fearing that I had a leak and was driving with an empty reservoir, I opened and found that the level looks perhaps a bit low since Motul is clear and cant really see where the level is at.

The brakes feel lose, a tad spongy if you will. I have to press the pedal more to have it start biting, nothing like with OEM brakes which started braking right away.
I already called the shop but they're closed and will have to call again on monday. I'm a bit apprehensive to drive in this state.

Ideas? What do y'all suggest?

Thanks

qwikredline
7th June 2014, 07:26 PM
dont drive the car; wash the brake fluid off before it etches the paint. I am guessing an issue with brake hose. Not sure how this can get fubar'd its an easy enough conversion, and not sure about broken bolts before? Summary of the best advice: dont drive it/ wash it up /deal with it monday /tow to the shop.

96mn12
7th June 2014, 07:33 PM
dont drive the car; wash the brake fluid off before it etches the paint. I am guessing an issue with brake hose. Not sure how this can get fubar'd its an easy enough conversion, and not sure about broken bolts before? Summary of the best advice: dont drive it/ wash it up /deal with it monday /tow to the shop.


Thanks John, I figured they fubar'd something. I can also see them leaving the calipers hanging by the brake lines.

goddamit

96mn12
7th June 2014, 07:44 PM
Oh and the bolts were the caliper mounting bracket bolts, for both rears. They snapped right where the blue threadlock started. Good thing I bought replacement everything

BKLYNHOLLA
8th June 2014, 01:12 PM
Hey everyone.

So, I ended up paying a shop to swap in the brakes since the bolts broke. On a long highway drive earlier today, I find my rims like the pictures posted. Covered in fluid. Fearing that I had a leak and was driving with an empty reservoir, I opened and found that the level looks perhaps a bit low since Motul is clear and cant really see where the level is at.

The brakes feel lose, a tad spongy if you will. I have to press the pedal more to have it start biting, nothing like with OEM brakes which started braking right away.
I already called the shop but they're closed and will have to call again on monday. I'm a bit apprehensive to drive in this state.

Ideas? What do y'all suggest?

Thanks

The dudes at the shop probably forgot to tighten one of the the bleed bolts on the brembo calipers after flushing the brake fluid.

96mn12
8th June 2014, 01:39 PM
The dudes at the shop probably forgot to tighten one of the the bleed bolts on the brembo calipers after flushing the brake fluid.

I thought the same at first, but all four? Anyways, hope the sonsofbitc*es man up and fix it.

BKLYNHOLLA
8th June 2014, 01:45 PM
I thought the same at first, but all four? Anyways, hope the sonsofbitc*es man up and fix it.

It possibly could be all 4... lol.

Tmarter
9th June 2014, 01:03 AM
wow that sucks...hopefully nothing was thrown up on the body of the car, they already owe you for refinishing the wheels...once you get brake fluid on there it's a done deal, it'll take the paint right off. No one needs to man up for that, go right to the service manager and tell them they're fixing it. Don't touch a thing on the car, tow it back and go in to watch them check the bleeder valves and lines.

96mn12
9th June 2014, 02:31 PM
UPDATE:

so, two of the lines where lose and the right rear caliper was trashed. The [email protected] overtightened the bleed bolt/valve and stripped it, which meant that I had to replace the caliper.

These guys are a national chain (tirepros.com) and their warranty is useless. (let the bashing begin)

AVOID AT ALL COSTS.

So, I'm having to deal with the shop directly and having them reimburse me for the new caliper (which I need to paint, btw) and labor. I also mentioned the wheels and opened a claim with them. There is photographic evidence of everything, so, when the wheels start peeling, they're being made responsible for them.

So, to summarize:

1) motherfcking loctite blue made them break the bolts off the carriers
2) I need to buy my own pneumatic tools
3) dont trust [email protected]$$es who dont know how to properly tighten a screw

Goddamn brembo upgrade...:evil:

berkeleydojah
9th June 2014, 05:32 PM
You have rear brembo calipers? Where did you get them?

qwikredline
9th June 2014, 09:46 PM
sad story. U dont need air tools to do brakes. Loctite dont break bolts. Torque wrench is an essential tool. u need two inch pound 3.8 drive and 1.2 inch angle torque electronic.
bleed nipples and caliper bolts have torque specs. I would send them a lawyers letter and go to the local TV station consumer advocate freaks with the story.... lol

96mn12
10th June 2014, 09:08 AM
sad story. U dont need air tools to do brakes. Loctite dont break bolts. Torque wrench is an essential tool. u need two inch pound 3.8 drive and 1.2 inch angle torque electronic.
bleed nipples and caliper bolts have torque specs. I would send them a lawyers letter and go to the local TV station consumer advocate freaks with the story.... lol

Well, I know it not supposed to, but those suckers were really thread-locked in there. Although at this stage Im doubting everything these idiots said...

My total costs for this ordeal is around 3200, assuming the rims will go south. Not worth paying a lawyer twice as much for this. Small claims seems like it would be the way to go.

So far the guy agreed to review the charges and I emailed him everything. I'll give him till this week to issue refund if not, off to the credit chargeback/dispute it goes. This time, for the entire amount.

billm0066
11th June 2014, 09:57 AM
sad story. U dont need air tools to do brakes. Loctite dont break bolts. Torque wrench is an essential tool. u need two inch pound 3.8 drive and 1.2 inch angle torque electronic.
bleed nipples and caliper bolts have torque specs. I would send them a lawyers letter and go to the local TV station consumer advocate freaks with the story.... lol

I think people who recommend contacting an attorney, have never used one before lol. Most attorneys will be the $200+ range an hour and some will be significantly higher. Small claims is where he should take it, but the defendant has the option to take it out of small claims to trial if they hire an attorney. TV station wont care about a small issue like this.

Document and photograph everything. It is preferable to use email, and if you speak on the phone take notes with details of the conversation and time. Try and resolve it without going to small claims. While most judges will side with a consumer if you have a legitimate case, you have the chance of losing. If you take it to small claims, there's a good chance they will try to settle with you. If you refuse the settlement, and lose in trial, you will be responsible for their attorney fees after the date they offered the settlement. I am not an attorney, but I had someone try to take me to small claims so I'm familiar with the process (In Michigan).

My advice, just try and work it out with them. Be nice but adamant about being reimbursed for your costs. If they offer you a decent settlement take it and move on. Brake jobs are not very hard to do, and you only need some hand tools to do the job. Live and learn my friend.

Saabohème
11th June 2014, 10:41 AM
I don't know what state Omicron is in;), but every state has different laws for civil cases, including the rules of procedure (although nearly all base their rules of civil procedure on the Federal Rules). MOST jurisdictions in this country have NOT adopted the English rule regarding responsibility for the attorney fess and costs of the other party in the event you lose your case (domestic relations cases are an aberration in this regard). In other words, in this country, in most jurisdictions, you will NOT be responsible for attorney fees and costs of the other party if you lose, but you should either consult with an attorney on that point or go online and research your state laws on that before you proceed, since, as I said before, every state has different laws and rules on this point. I AM an attorney BTW, so feel free to disregard anything I say. Why you should you be any different than my actual clients?

Many states like to divert small claims cases into ADR (alternative dispute resolution). Mediation is the most common and the cheapest (not to be confused with non-binding or binding arbitration, which are altogether different forms of ADR). Mediation only works where both parties are highly motivated to settle the matter and both are reasonable in their approaches and demands. Accordingly, of the many cases I have handled via mediation, only one settled by virtue of the mediation process itself, and my client in that case was an independent foreign car repair garage involved in a repair dispute.

The key to success any time you use the court system is documentation. Judges (referees or magistrates where you go with small claims courts) like to see hard evidence. Things that corroborate your story make your oral testimony more credible. He said-she said cases are messy and hard work for the magistrates. If you have lots of documentation to support all the important points of your case, the odds of winning increase dramatically. More importantly, the other party, when confronted by all that evidence, and not having much to back him up, will become much more motivated to settle, on more favorable terms to you.

In my successful mediation case, my client was a terrible record keeper and did not take any pictures. This put him at a decided disadvantage from the git-go. Working in his favor was that the plaintiff was a pathological liar. She had a valid case against my client, but she wanted to try to make him responsible for the bad and negligent work of other mechanics, in addition to his own. With a little digging, and a tip from another garage owner, I found an independent shop that had two locations and enjoyed a very good reputation in the community that had had the plaintiff's car in the shop for over month, 10 days of which time she was claiming my client had it and did bad work that he in fact did not do.

So on the day of mediation, when she was done telling her story, including the completely fabricated part, I produced an affidavit from the shop owner, including invoice copies and affidavits from the mechanics who worked on it, proving the car was not at my client's shop when she claimed. It was immediately obvious to all in the room that the mediator was now discounting every thing she had said. By impeaching the plaintiff's credibility on this one point (impeach, heck, I destroyed it) I completely poisoned her case (even the valid part).

Inasmuch as she had been seeking an injunction under Ohio consumer protection laws to shut him down, in addition to monetary damages, my client settled the case by fixing for free the stuff his mechanic screwed up, and SOME of the stuff another shop messed up.

The legal costs to my client were zero, as he was a friend of a friend and I did it pro bono. Which explains why I am pretty much retired now and living in a state of profound penury.

96mn12
11th June 2014, 10:35 PM
I don't know what state Omicron is in;), but every state has different laws for civil cases, including the rules of procedure (although nearly all base their rules of civil procedure on the Federal Rules). MOST jurisdictions in this country have NOT adopted the English rule regarding responsibility for the attorney fess and costs of the other party in the event you lose your case (domestic relations cases are an aberration in this regard). In other words, in this country, in most jurisdictions, you will NOT be responsible for attorney fees and costs of the other party if you lose, but you should either consult with an attorney on that point or go online and research your state laws on that before you proceed, since, as I said before, every state has different laws and rules on this point. I AM an attorney BTW, so feel free to disregard anything I say. Why you should you be any different than my actual clients?

Many states like to divert small claims cases into ADR (alternative dispute resolution). Mediation is the most common and the cheapest (not to be confused with non-binding or binding arbitration, which are altogether different forms of ADR). Mediation only works where both parties are highly motivated to settle the matter and both are reasonable in their approaches and demands. Accordingly, of the many cases I have handled via mediation, only one settled by virtue of the mediation process itself, and my client in that case was an independent foreign car repair garage involved in a repair dispute.

The key to success any time you use the court system is documentation. Judges (referees or magistrates where you go with small claims courts) like to see hard evidence. Things that corroborate your story make your oral testimony more credible. He said-she said cases are messy and hard work for the magistrates. If you have lots of documentation to support all the important points of your case, the odds of winning increase dramatically. More importantly, the other party, when confronted by all that evidence, and not having much to back him up, will become much more motivated to settle, on more favorable terms to you.

In my successful mediation case, my client was a terrible record keeper and did not take any pictures. This put him at a decided disadvantage from the git-go. Working in his favor was that the plaintiff was a pathological liar. She had a valid case against my client, but she wanted to try to make him responsible for the bad and negligent work of other mechanics, in addition to his own. With a little digging, and a tip from another garage owner, I found an independent shop that had two locations and enjoyed a very good reputation in the community that had had the plaintiff's car in the shop for over month, 10 days of which time she was claiming my client had it and did bad work that he in fact did not do.

So on the day of mediation, when she was done telling her story, including the completely fabricated part, I produced an affidavit from the shop owner, including invoice copies and affidavits from the mechanics who worked on it, proving the car was not at my client's shop when she claimed. It was immediately obvious to all in the room that the mediator was now discounting every thing she had said. By impeaching the plaintiff's credibility on this one point (impeach, heck, I destroyed it) I completely poisoned her case (even the valid part).

Inasmuch as she had been seeking an injunction under Ohio consumer protection laws to shut him down, in addition to monetary damages, my client settled the case by fixing for free the stuff his mechanic screwed up, and SOME of the stuff another shop messed up.

The legal costs to my client were zero, as he was a friend of a friend and I did it pro bono. Which explains why I am pretty much retired now and living in a state of profound penury.

Hey buddy, long time. I'm in Texas. I'll PM you the details.