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  #1  
Old 28th January 2008
tdhite tdhite is offline
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Default Fuel pump Replacement

First of all, most of the information contained herein is nothing more than a culmination of a host of other threads and my own experience. I cannot say enough about the posters within the other threads because they are clearly more knowledgable than I, and definitely helpful. I would lobby the reader use their help wherever possible and wherever I have failed to be clear here. I would also lobby all readers to add any relevant information and correct any errors and/or confusions I have have introduced.

I started an earlier thread here: http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=116993 because I'd not yet changed a fuel pump on a Saab and needed help. To the credit of this board, such help was supplied aplenty and with unmatched courtesy. With that said, and for the protection of all of us including you (the reader), it is important for the reader to understand the following legal notice before working on anything based on this information:

LEGAL DISCLAIMER:

The poster of this note is not a professional mechanic. As such, you understand that this information is not necessarily accurate and thus you use it at your own risk and agree that the author(s) herein are not liable for anythin you do, or any consequences or damages that may arise now or in the future.

THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE INFORMATION, WHATSOEVER. THE INFORMATION IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE USE, QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE INFORMATION IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE INFORMATION PROVE DEFECTIVE, OR INCORRECT IN ANY WAY, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR, CORRECTION AND ANY FUTURE LIABILITIES THAT MAY ARISE FROM THE USE OF THE INFORMATION.

IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING WILL THE POSTER OF THIS NOTE, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE NOTE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF LIFE OR LIMB) OR LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE INFORMATION TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER INFORMATION), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.


Seriously - be careful. Working on fuel systems is flirting with disaster. With the legal info above in mind, what follows documents a set of steps used to change the fuel pump in a 1999 Saab 9-3 SE ARC 2.0 Turbo:

0) Step zero is a pre-requisite step - go read all that stuff above again. Beware of what you are taking on as a project. You are assuming all the risk associated with the project at hand. You are dealing with dangerous substances. Gasoline is flammable and explosive. Keep a fire extinguisher handy. Be safe and be careful.

1) Check the gas gauge and mark it's reading for future reference.

2) Disconnect the battery and lift the back seats.

3) To gain access to the fuel pump without dropping the gas tank, you may cut the carpet and the access hole with a good pair of scissors and tin snips. Here's a shot of what I started with:






4) Remove the plastic cover that protects the fuel pump wiring block and check valves from dust and water. Just pry it up with the widest flat blade screwdriver you have. The cover is rather wimpy but it'll pry up ok.

5) Disconnect the pump wire harness. Using a small flat screw driver, insert the screw driver flat between the harness connector and the yellow tabs beneath the 'clip' part of the tap. Gently rotate the screw driver so as to pry the yellow tab holders away from the block connector. Do this on both sides while pulling the connector up enough to keep the tab you are prying from dropping back into place. Then take out the block connector once both tabs are 'free' from slipping back into place. Be gentle with the tabs because breaking them, while not the end of the world, isn't a great thing. Just rotate the screw driver enough to make room for the connector to move up.

6) With the harness block connector out of the way, spray some WD-40 (or other reasonable lubricant) down into the plastic 'nests' in which the plastic check valves are (likely tightly) placed. Each check valve has two o-rings:



The o-rings have probably grown tight due to drying and sticking to the walls of their housings. Let the WD-40 sit a while (5 minutes or so) to work it's way in a bit. You should end up with someting like this:




which shows the valves already out so you can see its containing 'nest' into which you'll be spraying the lubricant.

7) Working *only* with the top of the check valve, directly above the round valve housing, and *never* using any area or applying any pressure on the fuel line and/or the 'barbed' area to which the fuel line is connected, gently wiggle the check valves back-n-forth, using very small rotations. You will feel them loosening up as the WD-40 works its way in further. DO NOT RUSH! The check valves are delicate little toys (arguably poorly designed) and will break if you 'work them' too hard. The image here shows using pliers directly on the plastic, but to be even safer you should seriously consider 'buffering' the pliers by placing some rubber, folded paper towel, or some such thing between the pliers and the plastic:




8) *Gently* use your thumb to pry back the retaining tab holding the valve in place. Don't pry too far or the clip-tab may. If you do break one (or even both) - there are solutions (__link__), but if you are reasonably careful, they won't break. While keepint it pryed back, continue rotating the valve back-n-forth while pulling upward. Don't use a lot of pulling force, just enough to slowly lift the valved out. They will out quite well, but do yourself a favor and absolutely refise to rush at this effort.

At this point, you whould be seeing something like this:




9) Mark the placement of the fuel pump assembly with a Sharpie or similar marker. The image below (which is actually an image from when I removed the cap) shows the marker in red, of which there are two that should line up before you remove the cap: one on the the top of the fuel pump assembly, and a matching one on the car itself.



10) Make a cap ring removal tool. Saab has a special tool for this, but it's easy to fashion an inexpensive solution. Go get some 1/8" by 1/2" steel bar stock. Ace Hardware has it for $2 or so per three foot length. One of those is fine just cut what you need. Bend it into the shape as shown in the image below. The dimensions are 5 and 1/2" across and about 3" high. It's not critical that you get the dimensions exact since with 1/8" bar stock you can bend it a bit to fit when you use it.



11) Put the tool in the cap ring as shown in the image below. Make sure the 'legs' of the cap ring tool are near the ring inside edge and thus have plenty of material on the ring tabs to push against, Using a relatively long tool that you put between the 'legs' of the bent steel (a file works great since it gives good leverage and grips well) rotate the tool while pushing it down to turn the cap ring. Move the tool as necessary and keep turning 'til you can turn the cap ring the rest of the way off.



12) With the cap ring removed, take out the pump. This is a frustrating experience 'til you get the hang of it, but it's doable. Pull the pump module up about an inch or so and then rotate it clock-wise, say, 1/4 turn (don't force things here because you could bend the float arm or damage the float itself). At that point, the float arm is pointing roughly to the back of the car so you can start to get the pump up and finally tilt it out. You may have to use a couple fingers in the tank to grab the lower, canister part of the assembly tank and help position it to pull it up. Be carful, the spring steel bands holding the top to the canister part of the assembly are sharp. Also, keep looking down 'in there' to be sure none of the pump assembly's fuel lines are not blocking your progress in pulling the assembly up and out. Sooner or later you'll get it out far enough to tilt it sufficiently to get the float arm out. Don't force this - just work with it. It *will* come out.

13) With the pump assembly removed, start to disassemble it. There are four clips that hold the bottom canister of the assembly in place. Press them in and life out the pump cartridge and strainer filter from the enclosing canister. After this, you can either remove the strainer either before or after removing the wiring and tubing. The steps here remove the strainer after getting the pump/strainer out of the assembly.

14) Disconnect the wiring terminals from the pump cartridge. Note that the terminals are sized so assuming the new pump cartridge has correctly sized terminals, you can't mistake which wire goes where. If you are concerned, mark the new pump cartridge at this point so it is clear which wire goes where when it is installed. You can use needle nose pliers to remove the wire terminals, but be gentle or at the very least, buffer them with some rubber or other reasonable material so you don't crack the terminal housings.

-- continued in next post (reply) , there were too many images for one post --

Last edited by CleveSaab; 30th October 2012 at 02:54 PM.
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  #2  
Old 28th January 2008
tdhite tdhite is offline
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15) Remove the fuel line between the pump cartridge and the barbed 'T' connector. See the image below (note that this image shows the strainer already off so beware of that if you have not removed it yet).



To do this, carefully take a razor, such as an exacto knife, and cut the fuel tube the down to the first barb of the plastic fitting. You only need to cut enough to get a little flap to use to peel the remainder off of the barbed fitting.

The tube wraps around the spring steel band and finally ends at the plastic, barbed 'T' fitting. Carefully cut the tube down to the first barb of the 'T' fitting, again making just enough of a flap to peel the tube off. When peeling, take care to not break or crack the fitting.

At this point, you can remove the pump (and strainer) from the assembly.

16) Remove the strainer from the old pump. It helps to spray a little WD-40 on the o-ring sealing the strainer to the pump cartridge (see the image below). Work the WD-40 in by rotating (gently) the strainer back-n-forth until it frees up and moves smoothly, then take it off.



17) If your new pump cartridge does not have a new rubber damper (see the image below) , you will have to transfer the damper from the old to the new pump cartridge. This is some work. Before you start taking off the damper, get the plastic retaining ring off first so you do not break that. It is a delicate plastic ring so don't force it at all. The hardest part of is You have to get the damper over the electrical terminal block. Don't shy away from using WD-40 to help lubricate things. Note also that the damper has a notch line cut into one of the four 'rounds'. There is a matching notch on the pump cartridges so line that up correctly when you put it on the new pump.



At this point, it is time to reassemble the pump assembly, which is a lot easier than most of the last 16 steps. Maybe a break is a good idea at this point.

17) Put the new fuel line on the new pump's barbed fitting, and tighten with a hose clamp.

18) Put the strainer on the new pump cartridge. It just slips on since the new pump is clean and there is still a thin film WD-40 on the o-ring.

19) Put the pump and strainer into the canister, making sure to line up the bottom of the strainer and the rubber holder at the bottom of the canister.

20) Press the canister back into place and lock the clip-tabs into place. Before locking the clip-tabs, make sure you pull the new fuel line through the top of the canister and also note that you need to run the smaller (thinner) tube through the round hole on the canister top.

21) Place another hose clamp on the new fuel line and route the line similarly to the original fuel line removed in step 14 above, around the spring steel band. Leave some room so the band does not cut the fuel line over time. See the image here:



22) Connect the wiring terminals to the new fuel pump.

23) Put the assembly back into the tank.

24) Align the top of the fuel pump housing with the LINE mark(s) the LINE mark(s) on the tank.

25) Tighten the cap-ring back onto the fuel pump, making use of a new large o-ring for the cap or at least making sure the existing one is in good shape.

26) Push the check-valves into place again (they will go in easily since there remains a thin film of WD-40 on the o-rings from when you took them out.

27) Run the wiring harness (and block connector) through the the plastic dust cover.

28) Using a flat blade screw driver again, gently pry back the yellow connector clips and push the block connector into place.

29) Reconnect the battery.

30) Turn the key to the 'on' position (not 'start') and listen for the pump to prime itself. Check for leaks at the check valves and the fuel lines connected to them.

31) Check the gas guage to be sure it reads correctly. If not - you likely need to take the the pump back out and check the wiring.

31) Start the car.

32) Seal up the access hole you cut. There are a myriad of documented techniques for this. Most use a new piece of galvanized sheet metal, cut to fit and formed into place by bending it. Then either use very short self-drilling screws or simply 'glue' it down with silicone.

Hope this helps the next person get back on the road a bit quicker, and at a reasonable cost.
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  #3  
Old 29th January 2008
queryanalyzer queryanalyzer is offline
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Default Fuel pump ?

Great... appreciate your effort.
B/w: You might want to change the title to Fuel Pump...
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  #4  
Old 29th January 2008
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very cool. thanks for taking the time to be thorough. now I know how to cut that access hole without trying to sift thru other threads!
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  #5  
Old 29th January 2008
eckyboy eckyboy is offline
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Yes, fuel pump. That's how I changed mine and then found out it wasnt the problem but at least it's changed now

Great pics and write up.
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  #6  
Old 29th January 2008
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nice right up




ps i changed filter for pump in the title
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  #7  
Old 18th February 2008
TheSwede221 TheSwede221 is offline
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I did all this and now it pumps 12 psi ughhhhhh i cant figure it out everything is pumping but its in a cycle there is no presure going to the motor the mecanic said he pinced the lower return line and the presure jumped to 70 psi im at a loss for words
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  #8  
Old 18th February 2008
john bernard john bernard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSwede221
I did all this and now it pumps 12 psi ughhhhhh i cant figure it out everything is pumping but its in a cycle there is no presure going to the motor the mecanic said he pinced the lower return line and the presure jumped to 70 psi im at a loss for words
In that case, doesn't it mean that the fuel pressure regulator is at fault? The FPR releases the fuel to the return line to the tank
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  #9  
Old 18th February 2008
TheSwede221 TheSwede221 is offline
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well ya i jyust spent like 536 for a new assembly if its the fpr and i bought this he is eating the cost of the new assembly! i'll tell him were even
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  #10  
Old 18th February 2008
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MODS: PLEASE STICKY THIS!


thanks!

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  #11  
Old 30th March 2008
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Yes !
This I second, but, then it is on the "favorites" list..
A much needed and quality sticky FAQ.
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  #12  
Old 1st April 2008
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Thumbs up Fuel Pump

This info is awesome.......
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  #13  
Old 1st April 2008
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Default Fuel Pump Failer

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdhite
15) Remove the fuel line between the pump cartridge and the barbed 'T' connector. See the image below (note that this image shows the strainer already off so beware of that if you have not removed it yet).



To do this, carefully take a razor, such as an exacto knife, and cut the fuel tube the down to the first barb of the plastic fitting. You only need to cut enough to get a little flap to use to peel the remainder off of the barbed fitting.

The tube wraps around the spring steel band and finally ends at the plastic, barbed 'T' fitting. Carefully cut the tube down to the first barb of the 'T' fitting, again making just enough of a flap to peel the tube off. When peeling, take care to not break or crack the fitting.

At this point, you can remove the pump (and strainer) from the assembly.

16) Remove the strainer from the old pump. It helps to spray a little WD-40 on the o-ring sealing the strainer to the pump cartridge (see the image below). Work the WD-40 in by rotating (gently) the strainer back-n-forth until it frees up and moves smoothly, then take it off.



17) If your new pump cartridge does not have a new rubber damper (see the image below) , you will have to transfer the damper from the old to the new pump cartridge. This is some work. Before you start taking off the damper, get the plastic retaining ring off first so you do not break that. It is a delicate plastic ring so don't force it at all. The hardest part of is You have to get the damper over the electrical terminal block. Don't shy away from using WD-40 to help lubricate things. Note also that the damper has a notch line cut into one of the four 'rounds'. There is a matching notch on the pump cartridges so line that up correctly when you put it on the new pump.



At this point, it is time to reassemble the pump assembly, which is a lot easier than most of the last 16 steps. Maybe a break is a good idea at this point.

17) Put the new fuel line on the new pump's barbed fitting, and tighten with a hose clamp.

18) Put the strainer on the new pump cartridge. It just slips on since the new pump is clean and there is still a thin film WD-40 on the o-ring.

19) Put the pump and strainer into the canister, making sure to line up the bottom of the strainer and the rubber holder at the bottom of the canister.

20) Press the canister back into place and lock the clip-tabs into place. Before locking the clip-tabs, make sure you pull the new fuel line through the top of the canister and also note that you need to run the smaller (thinner) tube through the round hole on the canister top.

21) Place another hose clamp on the new fuel line and route the line similarly to the original fuel line removed in step 14 above, around the spring steel band. Leave some room so the band does not cut the fuel line over time. See the image here:



22) Connect the wiring terminals to the new fuel pump.

23) Put the assembly back into the tank.

24) Align the top of the fuel pump housing with the LINE mark(s) the LINE mark(s) on the tank.

25) Tighten the cap-ring back onto the fuel pump, making use of a new large o-ring for the cap or at least making sure the existing one is in good shape.

26) Push the check-valves into place again (they will go in easily since there remains a thin film of WD-40 on the o-rings from when you took them out.

27) Run the wiring harness (and block connector) through the the plastic dust cover.

28) Using a flat blade screw driver again, gently pry back the yellow connector clips and push the block connector into place.

29) Reconnect the battery.

30) Turn the key to the 'on' position (not 'start') and listen for the pump to prime itself. Check for leaks at the check valves and the fuel lines connected to them.

31) Check the gas guage to be sure it reads correctly. If not - you likely need to take the the pump back out and check the wiring.

31) Start the car.

32) Seal up the access hole you cut. There are a myriad of documented techniques for this. Most use a new piece of galvanized sheet metal, cut to fit and formed into place by bending it. Then either use very short self-drilling screws or simply 'glue' it down with silicone.

Hope this helps the next person get back on the road a bit quicker, and at a reasonable cost.



is this the same procedure for saab 900SE v6 thank you
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  #14  
Old 1st April 2008
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Question Fuel Pump

Quote:
Originally Posted by eckyboy
Yes, fuel pump. That's how I changed mine and then found out it wasnt the problem but at least it's changed now

Great pics and write up.
Hi then what was the problem with your car if it wasent the fuel pump.....?
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  #15  
Old 6th April 2008
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Default Fuel pump Replacement / Pressure Problem

I reaplace my fuel filter and New Fuel pum now the car still wont start,,,,, what should i do next.... i think theres no pressure in line.......

Last edited by Saab Max; 6th April 2008 at 01:19 PM. Reason: More Details
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  #16  
Old 6th April 2008
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Its very rare that a clogged fuel filter will deter the car from starting; particularly a modern EFI (electronic fuel injection)vehicle..

SaabMax : How did the old pump test out ?
This is done to isolate the troublesome CPS(crank position sensor)

Cutting the access is done carefully, very carefully; but ,I think if tin snips are used, it would be nigh impossible to mess up...
I need some silicone spray; this is far better than WD-40 for lubrication of rubber ....
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  #17  
Old 6th April 2008
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Default Fuel Problem/Presure

Quote:
Originally Posted by earthworm
Its very rare that a clogged fuel filter will deter the car from starting; particularly a modern EFI (electronic fuel injection)vehicle..

SaabMax : How did the old pump test out ?
This is done to isolate the troublesome CPS(crank position sensor)

Cutting the access is done carefully, very carefully; but ,I think if tin snips are used, it would be nigh impossible to mess up...
I need some silicone spray; this is far better than WD-40 for lubrication of rubber ....

The old pump was replaced with a new and a new fuel fliter was replace also...and it seems no pressure is in the line, car wont start.......
were iss the cps located and wat should i do with it
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  #18  
Old 10th April 2008
900chango 900chango is offline
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Bravo...

The most complete write up I have seen thus far. Please sticky this.

I would recommend removing the screw completely from the yellow plastic tab retainer.
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Old 12th April 2008
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Question New Fuel Pump Replacement

After installing new fuel pump car runs for almost 50 miles after fill up, but i notice the car don't have the same power as before (dont know why)...... now my my car wont start again (i check the pressure value in the front of the car and the car has alot of pressure and just a bit of fuel coming from it..... Can anyone help me with this matter plz
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  #20  
Old 13th April 2008
john bernard john bernard is offline
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the valve circled in your photo is the Schrader fuel pressure test valve. I'd strongly advise not pressing the pin in the center of this valve as you may get youself and the car sprayed with fuel if the system is pressurized, which it will be if the engine is running or has been running.That could be fatal.

This valve looks like the one on my V6, and I bought a pressure test gauge for about $32. at Autozone, even tho Saab was not listed on the package, it fit and worked fine. With the gauge properly attached to the Schrader valve, you can determine if your system is pressurized. It should become pressurized during startup, and if it does not the engine wont start. It will be pressurized while the engine is running(about 45 psi).When the engine is shut down, it should retain pressure for a while. After 30 minutes shut down it should retain at least about 22 psi
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