Can I drive with a Blown Turbo? [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: Can I drive with a Blown Turbo?


Jamal Bryant
13th June 2005, 01:42 PM
So, I've decided to take my 1992 T9000 in to an independent Saab mechanic to replace the turbo (after spending 15 mos replacing Tranny, headgasket, etc. i'm just fatigued and need to move onto some household projects.) This guy will install it for $170 USD

Question 1: His shop is 40 miles away. Can I drive the car with a blown turbo 40 miles on the highway? I've never had a blown turbo before, so this is new to me. Blown turbo was concluded by the excessive smoke from tailpipe, oil seepage around the turbo unit, and slight smoking of the unit. We test drove it after the HG replacement, and there was a cloud of smoke as we drove. The longer we drove, the smoke started to lessen (not sure why that is)

Question 2: How do you know if your timing is correct (or if its off). I was very worried about resetting my timing when reassembling my cylinder head. I followed the proceedure from the B234 Engine manual (set marks, turn crank shaft several turns, check marks again) and think I got it. Car starts and idles fine. She has some sputtering under load (if you really hit the gas hard). I have new NGK plugs and DI Cassette on order from Eeuroparts (Car still has original DI Cassette after 155,000) to see if this eliminates sputtering. But I'm wondering, would the car even start if timing was a problem?

durf
13th June 2005, 03:37 PM
Yah, as long as you top off the oil before you leve, it'll be fine. A little oil makes a lot of smoke - you shouldn't lose THAT much in just 40 miles.

klarking1075
17th June 2005, 01:18 PM
But I'm wondering, would the car even start if timing was a problem?

Depends how far off the timing is....... If it's only a degree or two it wont present any problems - you may lose a couple of hp or a mpg or two but otherwise not a problem. If it's any more than that you run the risk of having the pistons and valves meeting somewhere in the middle.

Hence why you manually turn the engine over... to make sure that you aren't going to have any probelms.

Kenneth

yaofeng
17th June 2005, 02:18 PM
Heck of course you can drive with the turbocharger not working. If you can stand the loss of power you can do it forever. If you don't like the smoke, remove the oil connection from the block and plug it. That will cut lubrication to the turbocharger. It is not working anyway.

But why would someone do it long term is beyond me. The 94cde I bought last October for a song has a dead turbo for quite sometime.

Returned
20th June 2005, 07:08 AM
I drove my previous 2.3 FPT for 8 months with a dead blower. Boy was it slow!

johncc
20th June 2005, 07:16 AM
Heck of course you can drive with the turbocharger not working. If you can stand the loss of power you can do it forever. If you don't like the smoke, remove the oil connection from the block and plug it. That will cut lubrication to the turbocharger.

I'd imagine if you did this before too long, the turbo would sieze up. And then you'd basically have a big immobile thing sitting in your intake and exhaust paths, messing up the breathing. So not a good idea long term! :)

Returned
20th June 2005, 07:21 AM
Although my turbo was seized for the 8 months. No smoke either.

Car still ran ok though (if ok means 67mph tops). :cheesy:

yaofeng
20th June 2005, 08:41 AM
Of course driving long term with a bad turbo is not a good idea. And it will seize eventually as the other OP mentioned. But if you are determined to do it, the car will still run, just slower.

Jamal Bryant
20th June 2005, 12:11 PM
;oops: Well never mind. After 15 long hard months of replacing the Tranny, Headgasket, clutch, oil pump seal, thermostat, radiator, waterpump, New DI-Cassette & NGK plugs (7-series)...

...I started her up, drove 5 miles (enroute to the mechanic whose 40 miles away) and she just cut-off on me on the road. Could not get her started again. Had to have it towed the other 35 miles to the shop. I'm totally clueless at this point. I'll update as I hear from the mechanic.

:roll: Sigh, that boring Honda/Toyota is starting to look attractive now.

yaofeng
20th June 2005, 12:24 PM
My heart goes out to you. I know the helpless feeling being stranded. I was once stranded 500 miles from home. Rented a car to come home and have the SAAB flat bed home. I also do not give up that easily. Over the years the only time I brought my SAAB to an indy was to reset a blinking SRS light. Without ISAT, that is something I cannot do.

Jamal Bryant
23rd June 2005, 10:22 AM
Mechanic's Update:

Mechanic dude says that my No start problem (after replacing DI-Cassette & NGK's) is the crank sensor. He's ordered a new one from the dealer. Unfortunately after reading some archives I guess I could've gotten a used one. Oh well :roll:

I don't know to much about the crank sensor (other than unbolting it when I replaced the oil pump seal). Mechanic says that there's no spark. If the Crank sensor is not functioning, does the system not send any spark to the DI-Cassettee at all? Is this because the system has no idea if its cranking? I'm just trying to follow the logic here.

yaofeng
23rd June 2005, 10:28 AM
The CPS on model year 94 and up is located in a different location on the block. It is at the front of the block on the transmission side, not near or at the oil pump.

If the CPS is bad, no sparks will be produced. But I guess there maybe other reasons for no sparks.

Jamal Bryant
23rd June 2005, 12:24 PM
The CPS on model year 94 and up is located in a different location on the block. It is at the front of the block on the transmission side, not near or at the oil pump.

Interesting point. On my 1992 T9000 its definately on the oil pump side. I remember researching what it was after changing the oil pump seal. I will update as the mis-adventures with my $900 fixer upper continues.