Bio-ethanol run-away success in Sweden! [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: Bio-ethanol run-away success in Sweden!


belfastcarlsson
12th May 2005, 11:59 AM
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SWEDEN: Saab ‘inundated’ with orders for bioethanol powered 9-5 in Sweden.


just-auto.com editorial team
407 words
12 May 2005
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Saab says that it is being inundated with orders for its newly developed bioethanol-fuelled car, which has just been launched onto its home market of Sweden.

Already, says Saab, the 9-5 BioPower, which runs on a blend of 85% renewable fuel bioethanol and 15% petrol (E85) (and which can run on 100% petrol if required), has an orderbank of more than 1,000 units since becoming available in the last month.

That means that between 85% and 90% of current 9-5 orders are for the BioPower derivative, which has propelled the Saab 9-5 into first place in the best-selling car rankings, overtaking arch domestic rival Volvo.

Although the 9-5 BioPower is on sale for the same price as its petrol equivalent, Saab engineers have developed the technology in a way that it actually delivers more power than the standard model, taking brake horse power (bhp) from 150 up to 180bhp.

Bioethanol is an alcohol, produced from grain, cellulose or sugar cane, making it a renewable fuel. Unlike petrol, the consumption of bioethanol does not raise atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), the greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming. This is because the emissions that are released during driving are cancelled out by the amount of CO2 that is removed from the atmosphere when crops for conversion are grown.

Swedish drivers of the BioPower are exempt from paying congestion charges in the capital city Stockholm, qualify for free parking throughout Swedish cities, and enjoy 20% lower company car tax charges. E85 also costs around 25% less at the pump per litre than petrol. Saab says that it would like to export BioPower technology to other European countries, including the UK, should market conditions support it. For example, the UK government's relatively primitive tax structure on tailpipe emissions does not distinguish between non-fossil and fossil CO2 emissions, (fossil being those that harm the environment), meaning that it would not automatically qualify for the same concessions in the UK that it does in Sweden.

Currently only available on the 2.0 Light-Pressure Turbo (LPT) 9-5, Saab is working on the launch of BioPower technology across the whole of its range, including on the top-of-the-range 9-5 Aero, which promises to deliver some 300bhp up from the current 250bhp.

DavidMorgan
20th May 2005, 04:54 PM
That is excellent news...
I am sure that this could become really important in Europe. Here we will get fiscal advantages to buy this sort of vehicle. With or without.. I am sold on the idea..

But for the US .... Their Gov dont care.....

PMI
21st May 2005, 01:46 PM
But for the US .... Their Gov dont care..... While that is very true speaking about the government, it does not mean that there is no future for ethanol powered cars in the US.

One part of the US (where I happen to live) already uses 10% ethanol gas now instead of the MTBE, even though MTBE is a much more profitable chemical to make. That was only a small victory for the farmers, but 10% of the fuel in even a part of the US amounts to a lot of money. It is a compromise... the chemical manufacturers get the most, but the farmers get a little also.

If the farm lobby becomes stronger or gets support from car owners paying ever higher gasoline prices, the success of ethanol powered cars in Europe could be enough to do the same thing... most alternative cars in the US will be electric with batteries, but the government might allow a small number of ethanol cars, especially if they are sold by GM.

earthworm
22nd May 2005, 10:56 AM
The growing of grain for fuel is nothing new; I remember from 30 years ago articles in Mother Earth and others about using solar power to distill the grain to alcohol.

The nation of Brazil was a leader in this alcohol technology , I do not know what happened - maybe this was killed off by "overly " low petroleum prices..

In America, I think the fuel prices may need to increase some more before this "grown in the field" fuel becomes economically feasible.
As usual, Europe seems to be years ahead of us

PMI
22nd May 2005, 01:37 PM
The nation of Brazil was a leader in this alcohol technology , I do not know what happened - maybe this was killed off by "overly " low petroleum prices...

In America, I think the fuel prices may need to increase some more before this "grown in the field" fuel becomes economically feasible.
As usual, Europe seems to be years ahead of us That is only partly accurate. Brazil does make ethanol much cheaper than domestic producers, but Europe is not likely to match those costs. Ethanol fuel is alive and well as an alternative to other fuels in Brazil. See following article, or just google ethanol and Brazil.

http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/news/world/11695394.htm

If you were to compare apples and apples, ethanol is inherently cheaper to make than gasoline, but it does not necessarily pollute less, just less in terms of some kinds of pollution. In the past it has not been better for your car than gasoline, but engines like the new one from Saab can change that in the future.

The great advantage is that anyone can grow the stuff to make it... and that is not necessarily great for us... meaning the capital US. It cost many billions of US taxpayer dollars to introduce gasoline back in Brazil. Many, many billions. The payoff for the US economy was equally huge.

Part of the deal was allowing Brazil to export a little of their ethanol surplus into the US and some Caribbean countries. The article cites the agreement in passing, although it also mentions an effort in Congress to block additional imports of ethanol in the future, to keep the domestic prices from collapsing.

Last_straw
22nd May 2005, 05:39 PM
it does not necessarily pollute less, just less in terms of some kinds of pollution

The main advantage is that the CO2 you are releasing by burning Ethanol into the air, has only recently been extracted from that air by crops, and provided they keep growing the same crops to provide the Ethanol those crops will keep sucking CO2 out of the air so the cycle is CO2 neutral, the amount of CO2 in the Air will not increase. When you burn gasoline you are releasing CO2 that was extracted millions of years ago, so the Net amount of CO2 in the atmosphere keeps on increasing :cry:
25% less cost per litre, 25% increase in power if I was in the market for new car & I lived in Sweden, i'd be at the front of the queue :cool:

PMI
22nd May 2005, 08:35 PM
25% less cost per litre, 25% increase in power if I was in the market for new car & I lived in Sweden, i'd be at the front of the queue :cool: ...and free parking!!! I wonder if there is an article about the engine anywhere?