High Intensity Discharge headlamps [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: High Intensity Discharge headlamps


nandanrp
5th February 2004, 11:34 PM
These headlights look an awful lot like HIDs to me (I hope so!! :D )

Whatdya think?

http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/~npadmana/hids2.jpg

SentraSR20
6th February 2004, 07:41 AM
Considering the competition that the 9-2X is going up against, it better have a number of features/options. Things like a power driver's seat, Auto Climate, heated leather, and yes, even HID headlamps as an option.... :wink: When Mazda starts offering the HID lamps as an option on their smallest, most inexpensive sedan, you know they are starting to become a fixture in the industry anyway.

JDN34
6th February 2004, 04:05 PM
HID is avaliable for 9-2x but not as a stand-alone option.


HTHs,


Jordan

nandanrp
6th February 2004, 04:54 PM
EXCELLENT! HIDs are one of the options high on my list...

If not stand-alone, what package do the HIDs come with, and what other options are in the package?

JDN34
6th February 2004, 05:04 PM
I'll find out when I go to work tomorrow.


HTHs,


Jordan

phriedom
6th February 2004, 07:07 PM
From what I understand, headlamps are restricted in their output candle power, so HID, Xenon, and Halogen all have the same maximum brightness. The only difference is the color of the light, and HID is very white, even a bit blue. Is that the whole story? Why is this a selling point?

nandanrp
6th February 2004, 07:54 PM
If you've never driven a car with HIDs, it won't mean a whole lot to you. The beam pattern is extremely well defined, and the bright white light makes a difference. I have driven two cars with HID lighting systems, one with projector beams, one without. I absolutely loved the headlights in both.

Some googling turned this up:

"HID lamps employ gas discharge rather than an incandescent filament to produce light. They offer the advantages of greater light output, higher luminous efficacy, and longer life than conventional systems using halogen lamps. Typically HID lamps produce two to three times more luminous flux than comparable halogen lamps. In general, most of this extra flux is distributed at larger angles creating a wider beam. HID headlamps also have a different spectral power distribution (SPD), being discharge rather than graybody sources. These SPDs tend to be shifted more toward the shorter visible wavelengths compared to the SPDs of tungsten halogen headlamps."

Flux is "intrinsic brightness," so HIDs are indeed brighter.

NOTE: this was a research paper, NOT an ad for HIDs! Read more here...http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/programs/transportation/pdf/PAL/PAL2001-vanderlofske.pdf

TeeLoo
7th February 2004, 06:21 PM
Thanks for the info nandanrp.

I personally find it harder to drive at night so brighter headlamps is a valuable feature for me.

I notice that cars with xenon/HIDs driving on the highway at night seem to light a whole lot more that regular halogens and this without being annoying to the other drivers and actually being less intense lighting to the car in front's rear view.

Could you tell me what the difference is between HIDs and xenon, to me they are the same.

Anyhow, I think the looks with HIDs or xenon is great (especially the ones that seem to be violet).

CosmicSaab
7th February 2004, 07:19 PM
HIDs and Xenons are the same, just different names. They are both High Intensity Discharge bulbs filled with Xenon gas.

SentraSR20
7th February 2004, 07:28 PM
Actually, you have to be careful with the terminology. You can now buy "Xenon" bulbs, which are much different from HID bulbs. These knockoffs are simply Halogen style bulbs filled with Xenon gas instead of Halogen gas. There is still a filament. With true HID's, you are actually arcing across the gas (like a flourescent bulb) to create light. That is why HID systems need ballasts, as it takes quite a bit of voltage to start an HID bulb. We're talking 20,000+ volts, but after the initial start, the HID bulb can continue to run on 12 volts like a regular bulb.

SentraSR20
7th February 2004, 07:28 PM
Actually, you have to be careful with the terminology. You can now buy "Xenon" bulbs, which are much different from HID bulbs. These knockoffs are simply Halogen style bulbs filled with Xenon gas instead of Halogen gas. There is still a filament. With true HID's, you are actually arcing across the gas (like a flourescent bulb) to create light. That is why HID systems need ballasts, as it takes quite a bit of voltage to start an HID bulb. We're talking 20,000+ volts, but after the initial start, the HID bulb can continue to run on 12 volts like a regular bulb.

SentraSR20
7th February 2004, 07:30 PM
Actually, you have to be careful with the terminology. You can now buy "Xenon" bulbs, which are much different from HID bulbs. These knockoffs are simply Halogen style bulbs filled with Xenon gas instead of Halogen gas. There is still a filament. With true HID's, you are actually arcing across the gas (like a flourescent bulb) to create light. That is why HID systems need ballasts, as it takes quite a bit of voltage to start an HID bulb. We're talking 20,000+ volts, but after the initial start, the HID bulb can continue to run on 12 volts like a regular bulb.

CosmicSaab
7th February 2004, 08:44 PM
Actually, you have to be careful with the terminology. You can now buy "Xenon" bulbs, which are much different from HID bulbs. These knockoffs are simply Halogen style bulbs filled with Xenon gas instead of Halogen gas. There is still a filament. With true HID's, you are actually arcing across the gas (like a flourescent bulb) to create light. That is why HID systems need ballasts, as it takes quite a bit of voltage to start an HID bulb. We're talking 20,000+ volts, but after the initial start, the HID bulb can continue to run on 12 volts like a regular bulb.

When I think Xenon, I think about the HID type, not the fillament type, so for me that's what I meant. I forgot about the fake ones. And flourscent bulbs do have an arc but the light created by that arc then hits a coating on the glass that light's up in a spectrum that humans can use. :wink: