1986 Saab 900 Flatnose Convertible [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: 1986 Saab 900 Flatnose Convertible


mmoe
23rd February 2010, 11:47 PM
New project! I found this car on Craigslist for $350 and couldn't resist. ;) I'm still giving thought to what exactly I want the scope of this project to be and hope to get some thoughts from all of you.

First, if you aren't aware, there were officially approximately 400 1986 Saab 900 Convertibles made. The following year, the front end was given the facelift, so these pre-facelift cars are quite rare. It is surely possible that many of these have already met an end, particularly because few people know how uncommon a flatnosed convertible is. The goals of this project are still under consideration. I'm very tempted to try and restore this car to original condition without significant deviation from stock. However, I'm also very tempted to deviate from stock configurations, including adding a flatnose SPG kit. There in lies my dilemma. This car seems to be one of those models that deserves to be preserved, but at the same time it might be a more exciting car otherwise. Thoughts?

Currently, the car is stock and seems to be nearly complete including the hard covers for the top. As far as I can tell, it may be that every '86 convertible was silver. The only example that seems to be otherwise is the one in the Heritage Collection which is considered to be more of a prototype anyways (reportedly with possible wooden spoiler parts?). As for the production cars, I have yet to find one that was not silver with a black top and dark grey leather interior. This one is no exception and follows suit. I plan to retain the color scheme and keep that pretty much as stock.

There did seem to be both auto and 5 speed versions, this one being a 5 speed. I am tempted to upgrade to a newer example of the 5 speed and perhaps put the original into storage just in case. The engine is the standard 2.0 turbo, just as it would be in the standard turbo model.

The condition currently is a mixed bag. The exterior is in remarkably good shape apart from a broken parking lamp and crack in the grille. There are very few dings and no dents to speak of really. The original paint is not peeling, fading or scratched anywhere and the clear coat looks almost as I imagine it did new. There isn't any rust apart from a little surface (mostly) rust near the battery tray. The rubber spoiler and surround is as close to new as I've seen, with no pitting or degredation to the surface finish. It still feels soft and smooth. The top is garbage. ;)

The interior is where the issues mostly reside. In fact, to say that it was disgusting to even deal with is an understatement. I'd go into details, but I'm finding it hard to describe the findings with some sense of dignity. :D

Aside from the serious need for removal of 3 extra large lawn bags full of garbage, the PO left the windows down for who knows how long and there was a lake inside the floorboards. You may wonder about the "floor rusters", but the carpet is half torn out which seems to have kept that from being as much of a problem. The seats are about as bad as I've seen and the door panel rubber is split in places. For a car that appears on the outside to have been garaged all it's life, the interior is just in shambles (though the dash has only a couple small cracks). The metal under the drivers side rear seat foot space is rusty around the rubber gromet and will need to be repaired (I don't expect that it will be to a large extent). The passengers side appears to still be exclusively surface rust and so far the drivers foot well also seems to be surface rust. There won't be too much floor pan repair necessary, but some. The trunk not rusted beyond surface rust but is missing something on the drivers side such as a floor panel or spare tire and cover. I'm unfamiliar with convertibles and don't yet know what is supposed to be there. Anyone car to share?

A few photos are attached. I did find amoung the various digusting things left in the car a very good MightyVac, so that was a nice bonus!

crwchf01
24th February 2010, 12:55 AM
You also forgot to mention the miniature lineman pliers, 6"lineman pliers, and 6" regular pliers. Trunk and back seat were in the class of "teenage females abandoned closet" and however long they were in the weather made it a question of "bio" or "inhalation" hazard. :p

mmoe
24th February 2010, 12:55 AM
I spent this afternoon getting the windows up to keep the weather from making things any worse. The ignition won't turn, so the only way currently seemed to be to physically lift the windows with the motors out of the way. While doing this I made some interesting discoveries.

The mounting holes for the window regulators seem to have been hand drilled to modified locations from the original design. The stamped out holes meant to be used were still covered in paint as if they had never had a regulator mounted to them. It's hard to describe, but it looks to me as if they discovered that the designed placement was not properly located for the window to go up correctly and made modifications to the locations on the line by hand.

There was also a very large glob of black rubber body sealant such as that used elsewhere on these cars which seemed to serve the purpose of filling a hole at the antennae drain tube that they hadn't really figured out how to deal with properly.

Overall, there is a lot to this car that is starting to look like the first 400 may have been a test production as much as anything.

I am also curios to know from other convertible owners if the rear seatbelts are asymmetrical. The belts in this car appear to be original and match in every way, but the buckles are different from one side to the other. They are also apparently meant to attach to the opposite buckle, meaning that they would criss-cross if both in use. It really appears to be designed to force the user to use a specific buckle rather than seeming to be a haphazardly installed mismatched set. Is this normal?

Also, thanks to crwchf01 for help with the car today!

mmoe
24th February 2010, 12:59 AM
You also forgot to mention the miniature lineman pliers, 6"lineman pliers, and 6" regular pliers. Trunk and back seat were in the class of "teenage females abandoned closet" and however long they were in the weather made it a question of "bio" or "inhalation" hazard. :p
Yes, it was very disgusting to say the least. :x:cry::cheesy:

zingZACH
24th February 2010, 01:27 AM
You're a lucky man! Can't wait to see the progress of this... I would have snatched this up in a heartbeat if I wasn't on the opposite coast. :cry:

mmoe
24th February 2010, 01:32 AM
You're a lucky man! Can't wait to see the progress of this... I would have snatched this up in a heartbeat if I wasn't on the opposite coast. :cry:
Thanks!

There's actually a 2 door sedan on your end of the country that I'd buy if it were closer. Comes with an SPG kit for $900, so not too bad. By the time I'd get over there and back into the driveway so to speak, it would be double or triple that, so not worth it really.

zingZACH
24th February 2010, 01:35 AM
It's all rusty...

mmoe
24th February 2010, 01:43 AM
It's all rusty...
Bummer, the 2 doors are sweeeet. That explains why it's still for sale I guess. ;)

mmoe
28th February 2010, 02:59 AM
Made some progress on the convertible today. Mostly, I just removed the interior and started cleaning it out. For now, I just need to get it to a point where I'm not annoying the neighbors with a derelict looking car, so I'll be putting in a reasonably functional temporary interior. I also have to get my emissions done this week, so tomorrow I'll be installing a muffler and working on getting it running well enough to pass.

Here's a couple photos. The first shows some of what I believe to show that these first year models were as much a test run as anything. Maybe others will have some input, but my guess is that there were problems that needed to be ironed out when the '87 model year was built, so the short production of '86s was probably as much to figure those things out as anything. The first photo is a good example. The holes punched when the doors were made would appear to have been incorrectly positions, possibly causing problems with the function of the windows going up and down. The upper righthand bolt hole seems to have been retained as a pivot and the other 3 holes along with the motor bolt access holes have been redrilled in a new location. This is symmetrical on the other door and does not look to be the work of a previous owner when viewed in person. The red arrows point to what appear to be stamped holes, while the green arrows point to the relocated holes. It should be noted that the holes are quite well drilled and show as round not triangular as it would be if a weekend hack had done this. There are no markings on the original tooling holes to suggest that there was ever anything mounted to them.

The second photo shows the progress of cleaning out the muck inside. It is finally getting to the point where a person can stand to smell the interior as it's mostly a soapy smell now. :)

I also installed a different shifter housing complete with ignition switch and lock. This was due to the fact that the key supplied by the PO did not seem to fit the ignition, so it was not possible to start the car. Fortunately for the sake of moving the vehicle after purchase, the reverse lockout feature was shot and it was possible to shift to neutral. The keys do fit the rest of the locks, so I think the ignition had been switched and the new key lost. The reverse lockout now functions properly and the car will crank.

After the exhaust, I just have to bleed the clutch and I should be ready to roll for a test drive and hopefully a final emissions test. If it passes (which I don't doubt it will), the car will be classified as a "classic" before the next required test which will make it exempt (cars 25 years and older are exempt here and the test is good for 2 years). I never worry about it in a Saab anyways, they are very clean cars when in good repair.

mmoe
28th February 2010, 03:03 AM
Another interesting tidbit is that the rear spherical reading lamps in the speaker grille are actually those used in the Ford Granada MK2 and have the Ford logo on them. Curious if that was the go forward light in later models, so if anyone knows I'd like to hear about it?

SpecialTool
28th February 2010, 09:10 AM
For now, I just need to get it to a point where I'm not annoying the neighbors with a derelict looking car,

Easy fix for that...

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:AxARxAnq3tPE7M:http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f392/btilim/car%2520covers/61ad86ac.jpg

mmoe
28th February 2010, 01:51 PM
Easy fix for that...

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:AxARxAnq3tPE7M:http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f392/btilim/car%2520covers/61ad86ac.jpg
Haha, they probably wouldn't like that much either. That would probably be a good solution if I had a driveway. I live on a steep hill with about 3 stories worth of stairs to my front door, so it's street parking only.

Other than the patches on the top, the exterior is really in excellent shape, looking like it's 2 years old instead of 25 years old. Once the temporary interior is in, it will look pretty respectable. A new top this summer will also go a long ways in the looks department. :)

mmoe
1st March 2010, 12:47 AM
Figured out why the clutch didn't work today. The PO said that it needed to be bled and had just had a new line run from the master to the slave. It did appear, in fact, that this is true and likely may even have had a new master and slave installed by the look of them. What he failed to mention is that the reason the clutch didn't work is not due to anything related to hydrolics.

I felt that the pedal felt oddly resistance-less and couldn't imagine how it was possible that I was not getting even some build on the pressure to start bleeding the line. After some head scratching, I thought I'd remove the knee bolster both as part of a change over to a temporary tan interior and to afford some sightline to the master cylinder, which I was starting to suspect had a bad seal or something to that effect (I hadn't really formulated much of an opinion as to the source of my woes, just the start of thoughts precipitating really ;) ). After gaining a good look at the clutch pedal, it all made sense.

The "U", as I will call it for lack of better knowledge, on the end of the pushrod that goes into the master cylinder had broken off of the pushrod. The PO, or perhaps someone else, had tried to duct tape the rod to the pedal by placing a larger cylinder onto the shaft (in an effort to afford some surface area to displace the pressure) and then wrapping copious amounts of duct tape around the whole assembly. As anyone with even basic understanding of how much force the pedal exerts onto the master would guess, this time the McGyver method failed quite miserably.

For the current phase of this project, I just need to get on the road long enough to get the emissions tested, so I went for a more sturdy fix and welded the "U" back onto the rod. I let the rod cool and then rotated it 90 degrees and welded again, another 90 then again, and a final 90 then again. I've moved the clutch forcefully to test it and so far the welds seem to be holding up quite well. However, the material does seem like it didn't take a weld very well so I'll soon replace the entire master.

I installed some 3 door tan interior parts including passable carpet which I cut to fit at the rear, door panels which don't fit perfectly but do the job (you'd really have to know what you're looking at to tell they don't belong), center console, knee bolster and a driver's seat. Passenger (front) seat soon to follow tomorrow.

I should be sitting with a driveable 'vert tomorrow if all goes as planned, then off to the emissions on Tuesday. Once the registration is current, the car can safely occupy a spot on the street without fear of being towed away as an abandoned vehicle.

philjohnhb
1st March 2010, 05:35 AM
I wonder if the doors for these early cars were from 2 or 3 doors and had the window surrounds cut away for the 'verts. The difference in the windscreen rakes between hard tops and soft tops and the need for the windows perhaps to move up and down at different angles is the reason for the different mounts for the window regulators?

mmoe
1st March 2010, 12:19 PM
I wonder if the doors for these early cars were from 2 or 3 doors and had the window surrounds cut away for the 'verts. The difference in the windscreen rakes between hard tops and soft tops and the need for the windows perhaps to move up and down at different angles is the reason for the different mounts for the window regulators?
Not sure. I'll do a comparison and report back. My guess is that these are convertible specific, not modified from other doors, but that they miscalculated the location of the regulators as it pertains to the window glass lining up with the top.

mmoe
2nd March 2010, 12:00 AM
It's alive!!! As I suspected, I was able to start it right up once I had a fully charged booster pack. Several of the vacuum hoses disintegrated upon the engine firing up, so it died if I took my foot off the gas. I pulled out some new vac line and replaced what was needed, then restarted. The car idled OK, but not quite right so I took another look and found one more vacuum leak at a disconnected hose. Once connected, the car idled beautifully and dead on at approximately 850 rpms (just below the "1" on the RPM gauge).

I hadn't installed the muffler yet, but will get it on tomorrow in time to get my emissions done. The engine sounds great, with the typical throaty burble that these turbos seem to always produce. There is a bit of lifter noise from a lack of oil, but I'll venture to guess that it will be gone before I make it to the emissions station. Most of it disappeared within a couple minutes of startup. I am pretty confident that as well as it runs, there will be no issues getting past emissions with flying colors. :D

I also made some progress with the windows. Once the engine was running, I get plenty of WD-40 down into the motors and worked on them until they broke free and started operating again. I've now got 3 working electric windows, both rears and the passenger front. Unfortunately, the driver's front is completely missing the teeth on the regulator, so I'lll have to fix that by other means. The glass wants to fall down about half way, so I used a ton of zip-ties to hold the regulator in position to keep it all the way up. There are enough of them that pressing down on the window glass cannot break them, so the car is now as secure as it can be. I even found that the central locking system is working properly!

From what I was able to gather, by comparison, most of the parts are the same between the 3 door and convertible regulators. They are just assembled differently which produces a different resulting motion. In theory, I should be able to use the geared portion of a 3 door regulator to replace the same part on the convertible, provided I can figure out how to hold them together since the original regulators are assembled with what amount to rivits, not bolts. I think I may be able to machine something up which will also server to make them easier to maintain in the future as well.

I also installed the other bucket seat, so a casual look into the car leaves the impression that it is in good repair. With the windows all up, it is not nearly the eyesore it was when I got it. :)

crwchf01
2nd March 2010, 01:20 AM
Well, Dr. Frankenvert:p, what are you going to do now? Was the reverse in good shape? Bring the removed shifter by and I'll see about getting the lock out without destruction.

philjohnhb
2nd March 2010, 11:00 AM
The 2/3 door regulators are the same as vert regulators.

mmoe
2nd March 2010, 12:16 PM
The 2/3 door regulators are the same as vert regulators.
Unfortunately, that is not the case for this car. It may be that they later changed the doors to use the same regulator, but on this '86 they are very clearly different. I had them side by side for comparison and while they share many of the same components, there are a couple that differ the ones in common are assemble in a different way One of the subtly different parts is the plate that the motor mounts to. There are different holes threaded for mounting the regulator to the door and the threaded holes have spacers that hold it at a different angle than the 2/3 door regulator would sit.

As for the regulator assembly, it almost looks like the opposite regulator. The driver's side looks closer to the passenger side on a 3 door, but still not quite the same. The individual arms and the rails are the same pieces, but they have been flipped around in different ways to create a different motion. I will be later on rebuilding the driver's door regulator, so you'll be able to see the differences in detail at that point. I'll document it pretty thoroughly so hopefully others will be able to rebuild their regulators as well (same principles will apply to all regulators).

mmoe
3rd March 2010, 01:59 AM
I did some welding today and finished up the exhaust system. It came with only a partial straight pipe after the catalytic converter, so I had to hack some misc. pipes together to get a complete system. I had a couple of turbo tailpipes around and a good turbo muffler which I had shortened the inlet pipe on when removing, so with a little effort it all came together quite well. I was quite proud of the welds today, not one of my strong suits really. I recently picked up a flux core wire feed welder from Harbor Freight for $110. It does a surprisingly good job when paired with some Lincoln flux core wire. For those that haven't used one, the splatter is somewhat of a typical byproduct similar to using an arc welder, but slightly less. After welding, I hammered the slag off and brushed the weld to see how it looked. Not too bad for a cheap welder run by a hack! ;)

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1213/IMG_2566web.jpghttp://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/IMG_2566web.jpg

After welding up the exhaust and installing it, I was able to test the motor out some more without bothering the neighborhood. While it was idling at spec, the vacuum on the boost gauge seemed a bit high. I figured I still had a vacuum leak to track down, and discovered it was the line going to the BOV(?) down below the thermostat (or so). After refastening the line, the idle continued to be very good and the vacuum level was showing to be about 1/3 the way from maximum vacuum ( CCW as the scale on the gauge reads) as it should in my experience. After idling for a half an hour or so, the remaining valvetrain ticking completely disappeared and the engine now seems to be very healthy. I moved the car off of the ramps which I had used for the exhaust work and took the photos below.

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1213/IMG_2568.jpghttp://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/IMG_2568.jpg

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/IMG_2576web.jpg


After dinner, I took the car out for it's first drive and discovered that not all is good. I know that first and reverse worked fine, since I'd used those to move the car around. I did not know the condition of the rest of the gears though. Second gear worked fine, but once I tried to shift into third it became obvious that the 3rd/4th syncro is completely shot. There really is no shifting into 3rd and while you can shift into 4th, there are no teeth to turn the shaft. :o At least 5th gear still works! :D

I believe I should be able to get my emissions test completed anyways, so that is still the plan for tomorrow morning. Once I get it passed, then I'll need to pull the motor out and replace the transmission. I'm about half done with reconditioning one (no new parts, just checking condition, cleaning and reassembling), so I should be able to get back on the road with a solid transmission quickly.

mmoe
3rd March 2010, 12:54 PM
Showing the car at idle. Temperature is good, doesn't overheat and stays pretty well in the middle. Half a tank of gas isn't bad for a $350 car and I also found $10.25 worth of quarters in it. You can see the vacuum, which is sitting about where they should when there's no leaks. The RPMs stay pretty much right at the bottom of the "1" with slight variation due to the AIC valve. If I unplug the valve, the idle doesn't vary at all and stays where it should, but if you rev the engine it can't recover and dies. While the AIC seems to work well enough, I think I may try a different one soon just to see if it will vary even less (though it currently only varies by maybe 50 rpms, so not bad and certainly good for an older 900).

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/Photo0430?full=1http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/Photo0430.jpg

Here's the temporary interior. Not too bad for something just to get by in. I'll be adding the door cards and handles soon.

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/Photo0431?full=1http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/Photo0431.jpg
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/Photo0431?full=1

mmoe
5th March 2010, 12:47 AM
I started getting serious about reconditioning a transmission for this car tonight. I began by putting together a make-shift pinion measuring device. It's made from 3 layers of 1/4" phenolic laminated together to bridge the gap across the differential housing and hold the dial indicator. I've also cut pieces off of an inner driver cup bearing casting which are glued (I believe permanently ;) ) to the phenolic. One side is reversed (meaning the flange face is on the inside instead of the outside like it would be on the installed driver cup) so that the tool can be inserted and removed from the differential through a driver cup hole on one side. I believe I will be able to take good repeatable measurements to properly relocate the pinion when transferring it to a different case. It is admittedly pretty hack looking, but I'm pretty sure it will be rigid and prove to serve the needed purpose. I'll detail this measurement later on.

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2580.jpg

The transmission will be a '93 5-speed transferred into an '89 case. The '93 cracked at the flange when pulling the engine block off at the self service wrecking yard, plus the '89 will provide the drain plug. If I were just dismantling the transmission, cleaning it and replacing it to the same case, measurements would not need to be taken so long as the same shims are used. Since I'm changing the case, I'll need to take more care to measure the pinion from both directions and shim as needed.

Currently, the case is mostly cleaned up and ready for the new parts. I haven't decided how much cleaner I care to make it since this one is more a fix and not really a rebuild. I'll probably give it one last scrub before I begin, but for now this is it:

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/album1217/IMG_2585?full=1http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2585.jpg

And here are most of the parts destined for installation. The pinion shaft is still in the old case, awaiting measurement before removal. I've given all the parts a once over already and they are in great shape. The reverse gear and reverse idler gear have some minor chipping and wear, but a better than average set for a used transmission based on what I've seen around. The bearings are all in good shape and I suspect the '93 had been rebuilt in the not too distant past. There are signs of cleaning in the engine oil compartment and the engine/transmission gasket was sealed quite differently than usual or what I consider factory.

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/album1217/IMG_2583?full=1http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2583.jpg

More tomorrow!

mmoe
5th March 2010, 04:44 AM
Finished the first version of my pinion measuring device (I'm sure there will be future new and improved iterations). The results were pretty good and measurement is easy, predictable and repeatable with accuracy.

First, I measured the pinion as it was in the old case. I used this measurement as the point for comparison by setting the dial indicator to read "0" at the tallest measurement. This is achieved by sliding the jig on the arc of the mating surface for the inner driver cup. When the maximum reading is discovered, the jig is left at that position and the indicator set to "0". The jig can then be removed, carefully, now holding the necessary information to reposition the pinion to match.

The '93 pinion was shimmed with .028" of shims (.020", .005", and .003") while the '89 pinion was shimmed with .043" of shims (.020", .020", and .003"). I installed the '93 pinion with the shims it previously used in the '93 case into the '89 case and took a measurement. The pinion was .019" lower than it should be, so I re-shimmed the pinion housing with a .020" shim and took another measurement. This time, the dial shown .001+ taller than "0", so within the +/-.002" tolerances.

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2586.jpg

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2589.jpg

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2590.jpg

mmoe
7th March 2010, 01:52 AM
I was able to get the car tested for emissions today and passed! HC emissions were a little high, which didn't surprise me much since the car seems to run just a bit rich. Idle emissions were 110ppm HC (max 220ppm allowable) and CO of .6% (max 1.2% allowable). Cruise emissions were 115 ppm HC (max 150ppm allowable) and CO of .2% (max 1.1% allowable). This was the last emissions test required in Washington state.

The turbo is not working quite right, either it's shot or the BOV is shot. I'll know more this week when I dig in some. The spool up is very strange sounding and I don't get much more than 1/8" into the yellow for boost. I've never had a partially working turbo, so I'll have to speculate that the problem lies elsewhere. For me, they've always been working or frozen, nothing much in between. Either way, I suspect that emissions will only improve once I've tracked the cause down. I also suspect that the 02 sensor may be a little off, so I'll need to test it as well. All in all, not bad for a car that hasn't been used in a long time, runs on only 4 of 6 gears and has a bad turbo system. It even has the same plugs, wires, distributor cap and rotor that I got it with. Other than inspecting the plugs for abnormal combustion and checking the timing, I've not even got to tuning it up yet!

I made some significant progress on the transmission as well. I pulled the '93 pinion shaft, reinstalled the '89 pinion shaft and then measured the '89. My concern was that if the '93 had in fact been worked on previously as I thought it might from the signs on the case, it is possible that it was not properly installed at the correct height, so matching the height may not be a good thing. The '89 seems to be orginal, it had fewer miles and no signs that it had ever been removed from the engine previously. It was a lot dirtier inside and other than the broken syncro spring was probably a nice transmission. The measurement of the '89 pinion came in a little over .001" lower than the target position for the '93 (which I was .001" taller than, within specs). This shown on the one hand that the '93 was originally in spec, but also causes a bit of a dilema.

The '89 pinion is marked as a "+1" and the '93 is marked as a "+4". In theory, the '93 should be .03 mm lower than the '89 to be at it's ideal position. This amounts to a difference of about .0013", meaning that the '93 should be that much lower than the '89. The target height I determined by measuring the '93 as installed in it's original case was, again, .001" higher than the '89. If the '89 is to be taken as correct, then this puts the '93 at the high limit of it's tolerance if placed at my target height. Since I was .001" taller than my target, the placement of the pinion as I located it was actually .001" tall out of specs (+/-.002"). To be on the safe side, I decided to remove a .003" shim from the stack and relocated the '93 to be .002" below the target height, which is also only .0003" over the stamped height (if the '89 is correct). My reasoning is that in this location, it is in tolerance for both my target height AND the actual stamped height as compared to the '89, so it covers all the bases. It also shows that I really need to machine a standart to use for calibration of my measuring device so that I can just go off the pinion stamp in the future.

After making the adjustment to the pinion, I then measured the distance from the nut to the transfer case mating surface and placed the corresponding shim on the pinion shaft. Gears were installed next, which I had cleaned the day before. I inspected each part as it was installed and found a bad syncro spring retainer on 2nd gear, which I then replaced. After installing all gears, I installed the selector shafts/forks, idler gear and laygear. The selector fork shaft was a problem going from a '93 into an '89, so more later. Once I got to installing the transfer case, I found that I was slightly off on length for the gear stack. After dismantling, remeasuring (only to get the exact same results), and reinstalling everything several times, I finally discovered I'd placed a bearing/flange that goes inside of 4th gear backwards. After correcting this, the assembly all went together perfectly!

The current state of the tranmission is that it is complete other than awaiting one modification. The selector fork shaft for the 1/2 and 3/4 gears is different than the '89 and the case wasn't made to accommodate this change. My solution was to remove the 1/2 fork from the selector shaft, turn the shaft around and then machine a grove into the shaft to pevent it from moving into the transfer case (which would cause it to fall out of the hole at the back of the case. There were many other ways you could modify this to work, but this seemed the most logical to me.

First, the shaft is meant to move with the 1/2 fork attached to it via a pin/circlip sortof thing. The '93 has an open hole to allow motion of the shaft, but since the fork is attached it can only move as far as the main selector shaft allows. The '89 forks both move independantly of the shaft and the shaft remains stationary. I decided to modify the '93 shaft to operate more like the '89 by removing the pin/circlip, which frees the 1/2 fork. The 1/2 fork then tended to bind on the groove in the shaft where it was previously fixed, so I rotated the shaft 180 degrees to move the groove under the 3/4 selector for, which I found did not bind on the groove at all. The only remaining problem was that the selector fork shaft then wants to move out of the rear retaining hole as you operate the selector shaft. To prevent this, I will be machining a groove into the shaft for a circlip to capture the shaft within the main case. Some photos:

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2601.jpg

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2599.jpg

So far, so long as I keep the shaft stationary (by hand), my test show that all shifting is working perfectly into all gears. The bit of shaft sticking into the transfer case does not interfere with anything else and can be left portruding.


My reverse gear isn't the best I've seen, but should be functional. Photo of the reverse gear, showing condition:

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2603.jpg

mmoe
8th March 2010, 02:45 AM
Eagle eyes will notice that I installed the reverse selector shaft in rotated 180 on axis from where it should have been. DOH! There is a slot that should be facing out, but fortunately I hadn't got the dowel pin set fully yet and the transfer case still needs to be sealed to the main case. Glad I caught this now, it would have been a PITA later!

philjohnhb
8th March 2010, 10:29 AM
With your boost issue, I wonder if the waste gate is stuck open, either the rod or spring stuck?

mmoe
8th March 2010, 03:20 PM
With your boost issue, I wonder if the waste gate is stuck open, either the rod or spring stuck?
Feels like the wastegate is properly seated closed and takes roughly the standard amount of force to open by hand. I'll be testing it with a mightyvac later today to confirm.

I'll also be testing the BOV/bypass valve, which I suspect is the culprit. I imagine that when the BOV is not functioning properly the engine would run a little rich. Since the emissions are showing that it runs rich (by my past Saab experience standards), it seems to be a logical place to check. I'll be pulling all the plumbing out and physically inspecting the turbo shaft for play and to get an idea of it's condition, so it will be a good opportunity to check the BOV and replace if needed.

mmoe
8th March 2010, 11:36 PM
Turbo seems to spin properly but with a little bit of wigglies to the shaft. Not the worst I've seen, but could use a rebuild soon. The wastegate seems to be fine, but the bypass valve does seem to be malfunctioning. I'm not 100% sure how it SHOULD be, but it does not seem correct. There is leaking both in pressure and vacuum functions at the 3/16 inch vaccum line nipple. I'd reckon that one way or the other should be tight, but I'm not entirely sure. Looks like some research is in order!

I also worked some more on the transmission this evening. I pulled it all apart, fixed the reverse idler gear selector shaft (which I had in 180 degrees backwards) and then located the slot for the circlip needed on the selector fork shaft to finish modifying the '93 innards to fit into the '89 case. Here's a photo:

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2604.jpg


I should be able to machine this up tomorrow and get the transmission assembled. The car needs a steering rack pretty badly as well, so I'll be pulling one out of my engine-less '85 for the time being to put in as I replace the transmission. I'll also be replacing the clutch master cylinder as I don't expect my welding to hold up for much longer. The quick fix served it's purpose in getting the emissions done, but I'd hate to get stuck without a clutch because the weld broke when I could have just dealt with it properly. ;)

philjohnhb
9th March 2010, 10:41 AM
Well that sounds like your BOV is knackered, at least they are cheap to replace.

mmoe
10th March 2010, 01:22 AM
Finished up the transmission today, apart from some final cleanup and buying a sidecover gasket. I'm using high oil resistive silicone in place of gaskets, but I discovered that the detent spring requires a gasket thickness or the pressure is too great on the shaft. It is absolutely amazing to me that .030" of gasket can be the difference between a smooth shifting transmission and one that is nearly impossible to shift due to binding. But there it is, you need to use the side cover gasket or the spring applies too much pressure on the selector shaft.

So here's the photos of my modified selector fork shaft. I used a dremel with a thin cuttoff wheel chucked into it, attached it to the lathe, put the shaft in a 3 jaw chuck and let'er rip. The placement and fit could not have been better in my opinion. There is just enough room to wiggle the shaft about .005" back and forth, but it's not tight enough that there is any pressure applied to the circlip by the installation of the transfer case. I do find circlips to be somewhat concerning, just that they seem like they are a weak link, but since the transmission has plenty of them already I suppose I shouldn't worry about one more. In the future, I'd be more likely to take my time and lathe a shoulder into the shaft for a oversized collar that would be captured by both the shaft and the transfer case. This would eliminate the possibility of a part falling out and damaging the transmission.

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2605.jpg


http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2607.jpg

mmoe
10th March 2010, 01:26 AM
Well that sounds like your BOV is knackered, at least they are cheap to replace.
Curious if you know how they should work? I've had a hard time finding a way to test them. I have a couple spares, but they all work completely differently from each other and I've no idea which one is right. :o

mmoe
11th March 2010, 05:54 PM
I registered the car today, so it's now officially roadworthy as far as the state is concerned. ;)

When I went to start up the motor today to idle it while I checked into the bypass valve operation some more, my quick fix welds broke on the clutch master the second I pushed it in before starting. Back to where I was a little over a week ago as that goes, but at least it made it through the emissions test! I'll be putting a spare in tomorrow if the weather cooperates. I've pulled the alternator in preparation and will replace the bushings while I'm at it.

Also, for those of you who have flatnoses and have known nothing else, an excellent modifications for servicing is to cut the end of the A/C bracket to slide onto the bottom bolt as it does in the newer models. I'm not sure when Saab started doing this ('89/'90 perhaps?), but once I stumbled onto a newer bracket with that factory change, I started making the same change to all my old brackets. It sure makes for an easier time getting that A/C unit out of the way which in turn make a whole lot of other things much easier. :cool:

mmoe
15th March 2010, 01:42 AM
New alternator bushings installed along with the master clutch cylinder today. That free mighty-vac that came in the car sure came in handy for bleeding the system!

I'm still getting the strange low whistle that I suspect is caused by the bypass valve, so I've got more looking into that problem yet to do. I did see the boost get into the higher levels of the orange range when testing out the clutch today, so it doesn't seem to be affecting the turbo. I think it would boost just a bit into the red if I went somewhere that I felt I could safely give it full throttle. I'm also hesitant to boost hard on a transmission that already has 2 gears MIA.



Project: 1986 Saab 900 Turbo Convertible

mmoe
16th March 2010, 12:22 AM
Had some issues with my steering wheel being too low, so I took the dash apart and had a closer look. Something important was missing......

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/IMG_2615.jpg


http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/IMG_2616.jpg


After replacing the missing bolts the steering was up at the normal position that I'm used to in other 900s. Otherwise, the car is getting to be quite drivable. The sun was out today, so a test drive was in order after reassembling the dash!




Project: 1986 Saab 900 Turbo Convertible

crwchf01
16th March 2010, 01:06 AM
Drop by - I just got the 2:4 manual in the mail today- Exhaust. cooling and turbo systems.

slapps
16th March 2010, 05:40 PM
Thank fo the gearbox idea :D !!!!

mmoe
16th March 2010, 07:38 PM
Thank fo the gearbox idea :D !!!!
Which idea was that? I have plenty of bad ideas, so I'm wondering which one you think is good. ;)

Read through your project thread and enjoyed it very much!

mmoe
16th March 2010, 09:24 PM
Today I found a bypass valve that seems to work properly. If you blow through either of the 2 large holes, there is no leakage to the opposite hole, nor to the vacuum connection. The vacuum connection is also sealed well and seems to operate the diaphragm, though I haven't checked it with the Mighty-vac yet. My best guess is that the valve should open when the manifold pressure drops to a vacuum (throttle closed) so as to relieve the excess pressure and recycle the air through the turbo by way of the vacuum line attached to the valve top. The vacuum diaphragm should therefor be sealed, which it is not on the other 2 examples I have on hand. Under boost, the vacuum line would seem to serve to help hold the valve shut.

I'll be trying this out tomorrow to see if it's the cause of my problems, but since it works both differently from the presumed faulty bypass valves AND in a logical way, it seems likely that it will make a difference in how the engine performs. I'll update with findings tomorrow.

allessence
18th March 2010, 07:59 AM
Hi, Nice job on the car.


Yes, most certainly the BOV can be the root cause of boost limits. And yes, the valve opens when vacuum is applied.

They say the stock ones are good for up to about 15Psi, but I prefer going with Forge Motorsports,

I like your pinion depth gauge as well. Very sheek. :cheesy:

slapps
6th May 2010, 01:59 PM
Which idea was that? I have plenty of bad ideas, so I'm wondering which one you think is good. ;)

Read through your project thread and enjoyed it very much!

Sorry for the delay,

I'm talking about the home made pinion gauge tool.

Some news on your project ?

mmoe
6th May 2010, 02:38 PM
Sorry for the delay,

I'm talking about the home made pinion gauge tool.

Some news on your project ?
Not a whole lot of news for this project lately. I've started another project, which will be somewhat of a learning project on restoration that will then be applied to this project. Meanwhile, it is starting to get to be nice out, so I've been driving this convertible daily and will probably do so until the end of the summer.

I've been working on some other transmission fixtures that you may find you need, particularly a fixture for holding the pinion shaft while the nut is removed or tightened. It is also used o hold the pinion shaft while measuring the preload on the pinion bearings. While you can usually just tighten the nut against the crush sleeve and it will be close enough, this measurement is not difficult to do and can provide a more precise preload. I think it is better to verify that it is right instead of just hoping it is.

Here's the fixture. It is made of two syncro hubs out of a spare (junk) transmission and a 3-4mm walled tube. I used a junk pinion shaft to hold the hubs while I welded the tube in place. The welds on the top were only to balance he expansion of the steel to keep the hubs aligned. I don't have a MIG welder, so as usual for me he welds are a bit splattered and ugly (typical of a flux core welder) ;) . The fixture is meant to be bolted or clamped to a workbench during use (I still have to drill some holes for bolts in the base).

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/SaabTools/DSCF2379.jpg
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/SaabTools/DSCF2380.jpg

mmoe
6th May 2010, 02:42 PM
Also, for those interested, here is a link to my other current project:

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=183398

and a past project which has pretty much concluded:

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=166078

ejenner
8th May 2010, 09:46 AM
Aww that's sad! I found a much, much easier way. I just pop one of the dogs in a vice making sure the tooth is at the end of the vice grip so it can't rotate as eaisly, then do the vice up tight, slot the main shaft into the dog and then twist the nut off using a really big spanner! Works every time. I've got one dog I use for this job which has been abused this way several times. All the other gearbox spares I have are kept for future use.

crwchf01
8th May 2010, 12:28 PM
Aww that's sad! I found a much, much easier way. I just pop one of the dogs in a vice making sure the tooth is at the end of the vice grip so it can't rotate as eaisly, then do the vice up tight, slot the main shaft into the dog and then twist the nut off using a really big spanner! Works every time. I've got one dog I use for this job which has been abused this way several times. All the other gearbox spares I have are kept for future use.
Ah, but you are speaking to an individual who almost has a production line of projects, and who frequents the local pick a parts like, for lack of a better description, Capt Ahab searching for a virgin reverse gear and idler.:lol: It will be interesting to see how the 2nd generation pinion tool comes out since he has a sample available to model from.

mmoe
8th May 2010, 01:32 PM
Aww that's sad! I found a much, much easier way. I just pop one of the dogs in a vice making sure the tooth is at the end of the vice grip so it can't rotate as eaisly, then do the vice up tight, slot the main shaft into the dog and then twist the nut off using a really big spanner! Works every time. I've got one dog I use for this job which has been abused this way several times. All the other gearbox spares I have are kept for future use.
I'll get plenty of use out of the fixture, so it will be worth it in the end. It was only about 20 minutes of work to cut the steel and weld it up. Now it will be bolted to my bench and available for use without any setup required. I've got 4 transmissions sitting on my workbench as it is and I typically pick up one or two each month. Some become parts supplies while others will be rebuilt.

mmoe
8th May 2010, 11:09 PM
Here's another version of the pinion shaft holder which I made for use in a vise. The parts are plentiful here and there are tons of transmissions that get crushed for recycling. The parts I've used are generally pretty easy to find in good shape at any self service wrecking yard. I'll be giving this one to crwchf01. ;)

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/SaabTools/IMG_2755.jpg
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/SaabTools/IMG_2755

shaverjeff
9th May 2010, 05:02 AM
Excellent project and great Craigslist find! I too just picked up an 86 turbo silver vert from craigslist (today) on the east coast. (5-speed) Unfortunatly the car looks good but the undercarriage is rotten. Far too rotten for me to warrant repair. This appears to have been a northern car early in its life.

Let me know if you need any specific bits as this is quickly turning into a parts car.
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l150/shaverjeff/Saab%20Stuff/1986%20parts%20car/DSC01136.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l150/shaverjeff/Saab%20Stuff/1986%20parts%20car/DSC01135.jpg

Good luck with the projects!

mmoe
9th May 2010, 02:21 PM
Excellent project and great Craigslist find! I too just picked up an 86 turbo silver vert from craigslist (today) on the east coast. (5-speed) Unfortunatly the car looks good but the undercarriage is rotten. Far too rotten for me to warrant repair. This appears to have been a northern car early in its life.

Let me know if you need any specific bits as this is quickly turning into a parts car.

Good luck with the projects!
PM sent. :)

ejenner
10th May 2010, 06:24 AM
Of course the proper Saab version is the best. It's a big metal flange that the pinion gear drops into. You then bolt it down to the bench. I think nutcase has one or maybe Sonett? Can't remember, one of them beat me to it when some tools were being sold off a few years ago.

slapps
13th May 2010, 06:47 PM
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/album1217/IMG_2580.jpg



It's little brother :
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_9YiOVEeA8us/S-XWo7M_rmI/AAAAAAAAHRU/mgW3x8QXBVA/s400/P1110143.JPG



http://lh3.ggpht.com/_9YiOVEeA8us/S-XWpbe0AUI/AAAAAAAAHRY/2-qH3prf07k/s400/P1110146.JPG

:cool:

mmoe
14th May 2010, 12:51 AM
It's little brother :
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_9YiOVEeA8us/S-XWo7M_rmI/AAAAAAAAHRU/mgW3x8QXBVA/s400/P1110143.JPG



http://lh3.ggpht.com/_9YiOVEeA8us/S-XWpbe0AUI/AAAAAAAAHRY/2-qH3prf07k/s400/P1110146.JPG

:cool:
Very nice!:cool: :D

mmoe
13th June 2010, 03:21 PM
Here's an update for the 'vert. I recently had a trip planned to SW Wyoming to retrieve my '86 SPG. I was planning to take my sedan, but unfortunately (for the sake of the trip) I ended up selling it back to the previous owner, which I was otherwise happy to do. So, I'm sitting there with a trip planned and only the convertible to take, since there is simply NO WAY that I'm prying the '89T from my wife for a week and leaving her with the 'vert and only 3 forward gears. There was also no way I was driving the 'vert to Wyoming with that transmission and 2 kids in the car! Given that I had about 3 days until I was leaving, I had to do something and do it fast. The only option seemed to be replacing the transmission, so that's exactly what I did.

I rounded up a couple of friends and we started out on the replacement. While I've dismantled and rebuilt many of these engines now, I've oddly never had a hoist to do it with, so removing the engine/transmission as a unit was a new thing for me. In hindsight, I could have actually done it in pieces faster simply because I have more experience that way AND there would have been the bonus of new gaskets/timing chain, etc for the same/less amount of hours. Regardless, it took about 4 hours to get the engine out and the transmission off, so at 3pm on Saturday I'm thinking we're in pretty good shape. Of course, that's when you always hit the problems that you couldn't have anticipated. ;) It ended up being around 6pm before the rebuilt transmission was on the engine and (more importantly) ready to install, mostly due to the fact that I was unable to reuse the hydrolic primary gear cover and didn't have a solid mount adapter for the newer transmission mount. I won't go into details, but the cover on the '86 is not quite compatible with the later model nut on the lower primary. If you know these transmissions, you'll probably know what I'm talking about and it was a complete oversight on my part. Once I procured the needed adapter bracket, the engine/transmission went in, somewhere around 9pm (getting dark).

This is Saturday and I'm planning to leave on Monday:
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/Photo0529.jpg

This is what the engine/transmission looked like on Sunday morning, when I arrived to start again:
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/DSCF2411.jpg

I spent all day Sunday installing things, and occasionally breaking things. I found I didn't have several things and needed to wait until Monday to purchase them. It seemed like leaving by Monday afternoon was doable, but as things often go that was not the case. By Monday night, I had pretty much wrapped it up, but felt that as long as I was now not leaving until Tuesday afternoon, I'd spend some time Tuesday morning tidying up the engine compartment and making sure that everything was in good working order. My goal was to have the car start on the first crank, which I felt would indicate that I was thorough and hopefully would have a trouble free trip. So, Tuesday afternoon approaches and I'm done. Get in the car and it did in fact start on the first try (though it took a few extra seconds for the fuel to get there)!

Here's the engine after everything was reattached:
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/DSCF2415.jpg

The trip went well, though I had to stop several times to work on a fuel leak between the FPR and the fuel rail (I eventually got it sorted out) and a wire between the alternator and the engine broke (like a fuseable link ground wire?) which caused the charging system to stop charging. I replace the wire and off we went. The one nagging problem I had was that the turbo wasn't producing more than 3 psi of boost. I couldn't think of why that would be since the turbo was a replacement for the crapped out one that was there previously and by all accounts it should be boosting hard. Just as I was getting to Green River, Wyoming, I realized my mistake! I had been using this turbo as an out of car test bed for my sedan's high compression turbo system to figure out a tool for testing the opening pressure on the wastegate. I had forgotten that during those test I had adjusted the wastegate to produce 3psi of pressure, then did the same to the Sedan's turbo after some testing (eventually raising the boost to 5psi on the Sedan). It wasn't broken, it was just doing what I had set it to do. Once in Wyoming, I adjusted the wastegate and now have full boost pressure (though my APC still gets fooled by some valve follower noise, so I'm usually at base boost of 3/4 into the yellow). On the way home, I was going up passes in 5th gear at 80mph no problem. ;)


While in Wyoming, I picked up the new '86 SPG and took it back to my mom's house. It's in rough shape, but still worth restoring. After extensive testing, I discovered that the wiring harness is shot, so I'll have to bring another one back to get it going. Everything else tested out OK though, so I look forward to driving it for the first time soon! Here's a couple shots of the SPG:
http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/DSCF2422.jpg

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/1986_Saab_900_Turbo_Convertible/DSCF2423.jpg

mmoe
20th August 2010, 05:46 PM
I just wrapped up a road trip that included 8500 miles of driving in the convertible! It's now put into storage for the winter and I'm starting to get to work on my '85 900T while driving the '86 SPG for the winter. I went everywhere from Calgary, Alberta to Huntington Beach, California with many, many stops in between. When all was said and done, the only problem I ran into was a bad clutch slave (brand new one from when the tranny was changed out) which I replaced with a spare that I had rebuilt with new o-rings. That will be the last non-Saab clutch slave I ever use! While it never completely failed, it leaked just enough to be a nuisance in traffic and was worth the effort to replace. Driving with the top down through most of the western U.S (and Canada) was fantastic! When I take the 'vert out of storage, I'll be starting the complete restoration so it could be quite some time before I get to use it again. :(

This project will be on hold for the winter, but I'll be adding to my '85T project soon.

IronJoe
20th August 2010, 07:05 PM
Sounds like lots of fun. Great thread BTW, tons of good info here.


I'll have to recruit you when my next transmission blows to bits. ;)

Saab-Daniel
21st August 2010, 01:53 AM
Sounds like you had a lot of fun with the car!
How come it's put in for storage for the winter already now?
August isn't gone yet?
I'm loving my convertible, really have fun driving it, eventhough it's not up to standard shape yet (boost-wise and ignition-components needs a re-do), it's sooo enjoyable, and even more so, once the temperature drops below 90, you don't get as sweety driving it :-)
Hmmm, maybe I need to start my second project thread... I feel the wrenching urge coming again already!! :-)
/Daniel.

mmoe
21st August 2010, 02:40 AM
Sounds like lots of fun. Great thread BTW, tons of good info here.


I'll have to recruit you when my next transmission blows to bits. ;)
I'd be glad to help out if you need it. I've got some plans for making some steel components this winter, such as the pinion bearing housing (for '89 and newer). I'll plan to make a few extras. ;)

mmoe
21st August 2010, 02:44 AM
Sounds like you had a lot of fun with the car!
How come it's put in for storage for the winter already now?
August isn't gone yet?
I'm loving my convertible, really have fun driving it, eventhough it's not up to standard shape yet (boost-wise and ignition-components needs a re-do), it's sooo enjoyable, and even more so, once the temperature drops below 90, you don't get as sweety driving it :-)
Hmmm, maybe I need to start my second project thread... I feel the wrenching urge coming again already!! :-)
/Daniel.
My storage opportunities are limited and located over 1000 miles from my home (and in a much drier climate), so it was now or never! I have to admit that driving a convertible has definitely grown on me and I pretty much keep the top down anytime it's not raining. Every day that it's not raining is a day I'll wish I still had it around. ;)

You should throw a project thread out there! It's always great to see the work people put into these cars. :)

mmoe
31st August 2010, 12:24 AM
I've been working pretty hard on getting my Saab stuff organized so that I can actually find parts when I want them. I've also be selling this and that to make some room. In doing so, I've taken the time to dismantle the original transmission from the 'vert. I was expecting to see some carnage on 4th gear since it was making the most awful sound you've ever heard when shifted into 4th and 3rd had a problem with jumping out of gear, which I figured was likely they synchro. As it turns out, all of my problems were caused by a bent selector fork combined with a fatter casting on the 1st/2nd selector fork (and a torn rubber linkage between shifter and selector shaft). There is no significant damage to 3rd or 4th and the transmission is completely rebuildable. The pinion bearings feel a little rough while hand turning them, so I expect that I'll find the start of some pitting to the races once I take it apart. The reverse gear and idler are in pretty decent shape, above average by a long ways really. I've got a good set of selector forks from an '85 that I can use in this tranny, so it should be a good one when rebuilt.

In other news, I bought another flatnose convertible today! It's an '87, but built in late '86 so probably one of the last of the '86s but rolled out as an '87. Here's a link to a thread with a photo:
http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=192427

It will be fun to go through the car and see how things may have evolved during that first year of production!

mmoe
8th April 2011, 04:07 PM
After buying a new home, I now have some garage space! I don't know when for sure yet, but I plan to bring the '86 flatnose back to Seattle sometime soon. I planned to have it be in a dry climate in Alberta (Canada) for the winter, but as luck would have it they had a very, very miserable winter and the car spent much of it literally buried in a snow drift. The snow has finally mostly gone away I'm told, and my father-in-law has gone out and started it up for the first time since last fall. He reports that it started right up first crank! Given the winter they had and the fact that it was just out in the fields (on a farm), he was quite surprised that it didn't need to be jump started or anything. He let it run for a couple hours and then shut it down, so it looks like all is still good and it is going to be in roadworthy condition when I finally do get up there. They have a branding every year at toward the end of May, so I'll probably try to get up there then and bring the car back with me. The '86 SPG will probably stay there for a while this time. The SPG needs all 4 quarter panels replaced anyways and he's got a nice welder. ;)

SPGreg
8th April 2011, 09:40 PM
Sounds like good news! Post some pix of the new garage? Hope the move went well.

mmoe
9th April 2011, 05:39 PM
Sounds like good news! Post some pix of the new garage? Hope the move went well.
The move did go well and we were able to take our time with it. The garage is still somewhat of a mess from unpacking, so I'll just post a photo of the outside. ;)

The dimensions are roughly 22 feet deep x 25 feet wide, so it's a pretty typical 2 car garage I'd say. I'd like to extend the front and get an extra 5 feet deep, but if it never happens I'll still enjoy it. Either way, I plan to add 2 feet to the height to gain some clearance. It's currently 8 feet, but it feels to low none the less. I also have a pretty full selection of woodworking tools that I'd like to be able to roll around as needed and extra ceiling height will be nice for building the cabinets when I finally get to remodeling the kitchen. You can see the kids are enjoying the new home!

http://www.saabphotos.com/gallery/albums/OtherSaabs/IMG_5289.jpg

The cars in the photo are the '86 SPG and the '87 T'vert. I never realized how much higher the rear of the T'vert is than the SPG (check out the bumpers) yet how much lower the roofline of the T'vert is until I looked at this photo.

SPGreg
9th April 2011, 10:22 PM
Nice! ;ol;

mmoe
11th May 2012, 06:50 PM
Brought the '86 vert back from Canada late last year and have been driving it around all winter. A month ago, or so, I managed to find the time and some good weather to replace the top, so I now have a waterproof roof for the first time since owning the car. Until now, my approach has been mostly to direct the water, which ran right through the top, down to the trunk well and out the open weep hole. That was enough to prevent the car from filling up with water, but was far from ideal. Since all the photos I had previously posted are now gone, thanks to the demise of the saabphotos site, I'll post a reminder of what the car looked like when I bought it along with how it's looking these days. It gets driven daily, currently by my wife while I take her car out of service for a suspension, steering, engine and transmission overhaul ('89 SPG clone).

Before:
http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2012/132/f/7/f758d77d8f2850ab2f341d66d26e5f88-d4zhuzb.jpg

Currently:
http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/132/c/6/my_saab_project_02_by_moesi51-d4zhvkl.jpg
http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2012/132/2/b/my_saab_project_03_by_moesi51-d4zhvx3.jpg

ejenner
12th May 2012, 04:42 AM
Well done on this. It was in quite a sorry state when you first got it!

mmoe
12th May 2012, 01:10 PM
Well done on this. It was in quite a sorry state when you first got it!
Thanks! I think the fact that my wife will now drive it says the most about it's current condition. She's a little snooty about that stuff. ;)

crwchf01
12th May 2012, 06:55 PM
Guess that means you cleared out all the other womens' clothing from the car, right?:cheesy: