How long to wait before changing oil in a hot car? [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: How long to wait before changing oil in a hot car?


Finch 93
18th October 2009, 08:21 PM
In the past, I drove 2.5 miles and waited 3 hours. That resulted in oil that was about the temperature of warm water in the house.

I am 3 hours behind schedule. I just turned off the car after driving 25 miles. I think it is too late to change oil because the car is too hot and I don't want to burn my hand. If I wait, it will get too dark outside. I think I have to wait until later this month.

What is your experience about how long to wait for a hot engine to cool down before changing oil?

Internet answer 1: That person does it cold.
Internet answer 2: 15 minutes after driving 15-20 minutes. http://www.motorists.org/blog/oil-change-essentials/ But isn't it still too hot?

kimvette
18th October 2009, 08:35 PM
I'd wait about half an hour when the weather is warm, or about 15 minutes when it's cold out.

Shazam
18th October 2009, 09:06 PM
I find it a little too hot after 15 min. Normally I give it an hour or so if I'm changing it after I drive.

Cuba
18th October 2009, 10:38 PM
Straight away hot. I've never burned myself before, but then I'm pretty clever. :cool:

boon94
18th October 2009, 10:43 PM
Straight away hot. I've never burned myself before, but then I'm pretty clever. :cool:
I've never gotten the damn nut off without getting my arms / clothes / floor soaked in oil :evil: :lol:

MacNoob
18th October 2009, 10:51 PM
Get home from whatever drive is long enough to warm up the car fully. Let car idle while I open garage door, position ramps. Drive car up on ramps and shut it off. Collect tools and oil, get coveralls on, slide underneath and have at 'er.

The hotter, the better - the oil is thinner and will drain better, and it will still have impurities in suspension rather than settled out on the bottom of the pan.

I wear gloves to prevent burns.

900t
18th October 2009, 10:58 PM
I like it hot like 15-20 minutes, earlier I would think bad for the turbo (could lead to some coking methinks)

Cuba
18th October 2009, 11:19 PM
Drive car up on ramps and shut it off. Collect tools and oil, get coveralls on, slide underneath and have at 'er.

The hotter, the better - the oil is thinner and will drain better, and it will still have impurities in suspension rather than settled out on the bottom of the pan.

I wear gloves to prevent burns.

How much do you think remains in the sump if you do it on ramps?

I agree with hotter the better, lower viscosity and faster flow, getting the most possible old oil out.

SpecialTool
19th October 2009, 01:17 AM
Here at SaabCentral, we're not afraid to tackle the big issues.

Twitchie
19th October 2009, 01:17 AM
It is definitely better to change the oil when it's hot. I let mine idle or drive it a bit, shut it off, then jack it up a little and drain it. This method has worked well for me on every vehicle I have owned.

SaabKen
19th October 2009, 01:55 AM
Straight away hot. I've never burned myself before, but then I'm pretty clever. :cool:

I agree with hotter the better, lower viscosity and faster flow, getting the most possible old oil out.

Must ..... get ...... hot ..... oil ....... out ......

http://junk.mdm3.com/YouTube_-_kung_fu-20080303-045544.png

ChinaCat
19th October 2009, 02:01 AM
here at saabcentral, we're not afraid to tackle the big issues.
:d:d:d:d:d

Ash-Lee
19th October 2009, 04:29 AM
Try what i do, i use a plastic carrier bag and 2 rubber bands! :cheesy:

Put your disposable glove and the put a hole in the bag to make a disposable sleeve and use the rubber bands to make sure none runs down your arm.

Yes you will look silly but it works.

DavidMorgan
19th October 2009, 05:03 AM
Straight away hot. I've never burned myself before, but then I'm pretty clever. :cool:
Me too :cheesy: but I do wear a rubber glove ;)

Chris 9-5
19th October 2009, 06:42 AM
Straight away hot. I've never burned myself before, but then I'm pretty clever. :cool:


Me too, but then its Wessy who changes it :p

AeroKid
19th October 2009, 12:03 PM
I dont wait, I get right down to business.:cheesy:
then again I have silicone coated gloves so I dont feel the pain when I do get it on my hands.

mt.aero
19th October 2009, 12:20 PM
How much do you think remains in the sump if you do it on ramps?

I would think you get more out since it would angle toward the drain hole. Then again, what do I really know. :confused:

nutcase
19th October 2009, 12:30 PM
Do it hot ya wuss :p

disclaimer: No responsibility accepted for any scalds!

I always do mine hot. Just let the drain plug drop, then fish it out with a magnet on a stick :)

MacNoob
19th October 2009, 01:04 PM
I would think you get more out since it would angle toward the drain hole. Then again, what do I really know. :confused:

Yes, I think you get it all out because of the angle.

lscrx
19th October 2009, 01:08 PM
I do it hot, pop the plug as soon as I have it up on the ramps and then let the oil drain for 30-45 minutes. Then I pull the filter off... when things aren't quite as hot, my oil pan has a screen to keep you from losing the plug in the hot oil... very handy.

WhiteT5
19th October 2009, 01:32 PM
Get home from whatever drive is long enough to warm up the car fully. Let car idle while I open garage door, position ramps. Drive car up on ramps and shut it off. Collect tools and oil, get coveralls on, slide underneath and have at 'er.

The hotter, the better - the oil is thinner and will drain better, and it will still have impurities in suspension rather than settled out on the bottom of the pan.

I wear gloves to prevent burns.
This is the way to do it. It is also worth noting that used motor oil has been shown to increase the likelihood of skin cancer in laboratory animals.


How much do you think remains in the sump if you do it on ramps?

I agree with hotter the better, lower viscosity and faster flow, getting the most possible old oil out.

Depends on the car and how much the person changing it cares about oil remaining in the sump. I have a '92 Volvo 240 that has the drain plug right in the middle of the bottom of the pan. In this configuration, the oil should drain best with the car flat on the ground. On my 850, the plug is at the rear of the pan, which means that being on ramps is the best way to do it. I recently changed the oil in a friend's Honda S2000, which had the plug on the passenger side of the oil pan. I found that having the car on ramps was not especially efficient at getting the oil out. After jacking up the driver's side of the car, it came out much more quickly.

SaabKen
19th October 2009, 01:33 PM
I would think you get more out since it would angle toward the drain hole. Then again, what do I really know. :confused:

Yes, I think you get it all out because of the angle.
It's all in the angle ......

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/122/304515649_9b69fff57f.jpg

Cuba
19th October 2009, 01:54 PM
This is the way to do it. It is also worth noting that used motor oil has been shown to increase the likelihood of skin cancer in laboratory animals.
Fortunately, I was born into the rich tapestry of humankind....oh and we have more latex gloves than you can shake a stick at 'round here. Powdered or un-powdered, vinyl and full length sterile surgical if you don't want to give your car a nasty infection or catch some sort of sludgicemia.




Depends on the car and how much the person changing it cares about oil remaining in the sump. I have a '92 Volvo 240 that has the drain plug right in the middle of the bottom of the pan. In this configuration, the oil should drain best with the car flat on the ground. On my 850, the plug is at the rear of the pan, which means that being on ramps is the best way to do it.

indeed, the last oil I did was my 850 and as you say, the plug is at the rear.
Sigh.....so many sumps over the years. Dairy farmers must feel the same. :)

mt.aero
19th October 2009, 02:28 PM
It's all in the angle ......

but you gotta shake it to get every last bit. ;)

lscrx
19th October 2009, 02:32 PM
This is the way to do it. It is also worth noting that used motor oil has been shown to increase the likelihood of skin cancer in laboratory animals.

What do they do? Give the mouse a bath in used motor oil? I doubt that momentary contact every few months when changing your own oil will have any chance of raising your risk to skin cancer. Maybe if you were a mechanic and changed the oil of a dozen cars a day with no gloves on... but us DIY'ers are probably safe.

900t
19th October 2009, 07:18 PM
What do they do? Give the mouse a bath in used motor oil? I doubt that momentary contact every few months when changing your own oil will have any chance of raising your risk to skin cancer. Maybe if you were a mechanic and changed the oil of a dozen cars a day with no gloves on... but us DIY'ers are probably safe.

Exactly

valbowski1980
19th October 2009, 09:55 PM
Straight away hot. I've never burned myself before, but then I'm pretty clever. :cool:
Same here. Straight onto the ramps and out with the old oil and filter. And I always wear rubber gloves.