'86 900 beater/budget project car [Archive] - SaabCentral Forums

: '86 900 beater/budget project car


Bob George
09-05-09, 05:04 PM
Hey everyone,

I'm new to Saabs and just picked up this '86 900 at a local auction for $200. It runs and drives fine and seems to be all there. My friend and I are going to make a beater/budget project out of it. I've owned several Volvo 240s and am an active member over on Turbobricks. I also have a pretty serious 1982 242 Turbo build underway. Check it out here: http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=157240

Anyway, the plan is pretty basic. Cut the springs, rattle can it flat black, tint the windows and try to iron out some the mechanical and electrical glitches (as we discover them). I am a fan of turbos and would love to run some boost through the motor. That's probably phase 2 though. :D

I'm sure I'll have lots of questions along the way. My '82 242 had CIS injection that I removed, so I'm at least familiar with it. Here are some pics:

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c85/volvo244life/86-saab-900-front.jpg

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c85/volvo244life/86-saab-900-engine.jpg

ejenner
12-05-09, 03:57 AM
You like punishment don't you... several old Volvo's and now this ratty old Saab as well... and Megasquirt too... that's fun!

Eaisest way to do a turbo conversion is to have both cars sitting side-by-side and swap the bits over from one car to the other. But then you need to ask why? Might as well just drive the turbo - the only reason would be because you want to save a good bodyshell from the 900i. Although another good reason, less obvious though... is to keep the 900i bodyshell totally standard on the outside but fit turbo running gear underneath... then you have a pretty evil Q-car!

ejenner
12-05-09, 04:05 AM
Looked at your Volvo project... not sure about that wastegate setup you have there... looks a bit dodgy, but can't see it completely so not sure... where does the pipe for the wastegate exit the manifold?

Like the design for your crank-sensor bracket. I've done a couple of crank-sensor brackets in the last few months and just tried to make them as accurate as possible. Getting them mm perfect so the sensor sits right next to the disc is not a totally easy job.

This one is for fitting the T5 ECU system from a 9000 onto a 900. Normally, on the 9000 engine (that won't fit the 900) the sensor is pushed into a hole that's drilled on the side of the cylinder block and the sensor disc is on the end of the crankshaft inside the engine. If you want to use T5 on a 900 you have to mount the sensor outside the engine instead.

http://www.red-green.co.uk/web/photos/gallery/images/full/crank_sensor_019.jpg

http://www.red-green.co.uk/web/photos/gallery/images/full/crank_sensor_020.jpg


Then I just did this one for my other Saab. I'm installing an aftermarket ECU to this one. Just using an old spare cylinder block to build the sensor before removing from here and transferring to the engine that's actually in the car.

http://www.red-green.co.uk/web/photos/gallery/99t16/mid/crank_sensor_004.jpg

RickyS
12-05-09, 04:39 AM
I'm new to Saabs and just picked up this '86 900 at a local auction for $200. It runs and drives fine and seems to be all there.

That sounds like a bargain. Great to see an 8v project.

Bob George
14-05-09, 01:25 PM
not sure about that wastegate setup you have there... looks a bit dodgy, but can't see it completely so not sure... where does the pipe for the wastegate exit the manifold?

The pipe for the wastegate on the Volvo exits out of the collector just below the T3 flange. In the pics it probably looks like it's coming out of one of the individual runners, but that's not the case. Should work well :D

And yes, I like punishment. And frustration. And apparently 8v Swedish cars. ;)

We have been running the Saab around for a week and it runs great. It doesn't even leak! Problem now is that it's stuck in second gear. I had to get under the dash to replace the brake light switch, so I thought maybe I had knocked something loose. But with the clutch in the car rolls fine in neutral, and it looks like it has a cable driven clutch anyway? Not a whole lot to screw up.

With my Volvos I would just slip the clutch in second if this happened, but the Saab seems to need to be in reverse to start.

Who knows, maybe it needs a transmission. I guess I've heard that '80s 900s always need transmissions...

ejenner
14-05-09, 04:18 PM
It does look in the pictures as if the wastgate is feeding off one of the runners. But if comming from the flange then that's good.

The car being stuck in second could be related to the bushing that connects the shift leaver to the stub on the back of the gearbox. Can be seen if you look down the back of the engine and can split. Symptoms are that gears can't be selected properly.

The transmissions do tend to fail on these cars but only after many, many miles and usually more likely on the turbo models than the n/a ones.

Clutch system is hydraulic on these cars. Takes the fluid from the brake fluid tank. Master mounted on the firewall, connected by a pipe to the slave at the front of the engine under the plastic clutch cover.

Chris_R
20-05-09, 08:52 PM
Hey everyone,

I'm new to Saabs and just picked up this '86 900 at a local auction for $200. It runs and drives fine and seems to be all there. My friend and I are going to make a beater/budget project out of it. I've owned several Volvo 240s and am an active member over on Turbobricks. I also have a pretty serious 1982 242 Turbo build underway. Check it out here: http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=157240

Hey Bob! I'm also a Turbobricker who's looking into SAABs.
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=124336

I hope to get my hands on a 88+ 16V turbo convertible in the near future.

I'll be watching your build thread - best of luck!

SOAB
20-05-09, 09:35 PM
Let me know how clipping the springs goes, me and my dad are looking at doing that to our 900s

ejenner
21-05-09, 04:02 AM
Got to be careful with chopping springs. There is nothing to hold them into the housings so if they are too short then they will just fall out. Also, what seems to be a small difference at chopping time (1 coil for example) actually works out to quite a big drop in ride height once the spring is back in the car. I'd consider half a coil as a good starting point.

Bob George
21-05-09, 09:12 AM
I've cut springs on Volvos before, you do have to be careful not to go too short because the front springs will come unseated when the car is jacked up. However, I've found that over time my 120K mile old Bilstein HDs have "adjusted" to the shortened springs in that they no longer decompress fully with a load off them. Therefore they don't pop the springs unseated :D The difference with the Volvo 240s, I guess, is that the strut is inside the spring and therefore would keep the spring from actually coming off the car in an extreme situation. I can see how the Saab would be more of a hazard.

I cut 1.5 coils off 2" lowering springs to achieve the ride height below (just in the front, the rears are stock lowering springs). It handles well on the road, it's just a bit rough with the 215/45 summer tires. I never had the Bilsteins revalved or anything. Not a big deal on my 236K mile daily driver...

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c85/volvo244life/244-polaris-2.jpg

Also, the shifting issue has been resolved. I think it was just a stiff bushing. The car runs great and is actually pretty smooth to drive. My friend has had it for the last week, I need to steal it back this weekend...

SOAB
06-06-09, 09:34 AM
Wouldn't you not be able to cut springs off the saab though cause I was looking at the springs on my 900s and its got that flat coil at the end, so if you cut that flat coil off wouldnt the coil just like dig into the housing?

motomartin
09-06-09, 12:42 AM
I'm really jealous.............





of that wood pile in the top pic :D


its coming into winter here:(